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Mexican pickled dried chiles, any recipes?

At Teresa's Mosaic Cafe here in Tucson, they have a really nice pickled dried chile. It may be Oaxacan. My guy wants me to make it for him.

I looked all over Mexican recipes sites/ my mexican cookbooks, and so on, and this is the only one I found (and I am trying it, but I don't think it is the same):

http://johndlee.hubpages.com/hub/Mexi...

Anyone able to help me out here?

Anyone else

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  1. Have you tried any of Rick Bayless' books?

    My Mexican cookbooks do not mention pickled dried chiles probably because the variety (varieties) of chile(s) need to be specified.

    Maybe this will help...
    http://johndlee.hubpages.com/hub/Mexi...

    I make a chile puree using dried chiles that is added to my chili when I brew some. I do not have a standard recipe because I like to play with my food.

    I rehydrate anchos, guajillos, chipotles, peguin and de arbol chiles in no specific measurements. I put these rehydrated chiles in a wide mouth glass jar and add some of the water that was used to rehydrate them. To this mess I add 3 or 4 bhut jolokia (ghost peppers), some olive oil, a little vinegar and some salt. The latter 2 ingredients are used as preservatives. Using an immersible blender (stick blender), puree the chiles until really smooth. As long as this stuff is refrigerated, it will last for sevral weeks without getting moldy because of the vinegar and salt. IT IS HOTTER THAN HELL because of the bhut jolokia chiles. They are now the 2nd hottest chile known to humans because there is a new variety that has displaced that one...the Trinidad Moruga Scorpion.

    In bocca al lupo (Italian for Good Luck)

    4 Replies
    1. re: ChiliDude

      The Link you gave her is the same one she already has?

      1. re: chefj

        OK, so I goofed! If Googles using the keywords "Mexican pickled dried chiles", she'll have 1,690,000 hits from which to choose.

        Mea culpa!

        1. re: ChiliDude

          But despite the search terms the vast majority of the results aren't about pickling dried chiles. Apart from chipotles en adobo (I guess that counts as pickled), pickling dried chiles is pretty uncommon in Mexico.

          I did some searches in Spanish terms -- "chiles secos en escabeche", "chiles secos en vinagre", and the like -- and came up with mostly empty nets.

          1. re: Soul Vole

            I did the same spanish searches, and also found nothing but I am guessing that the above-mentioned Diana Kennedy book will do the trick. Thanks everyone! I will report back after I get the book from library and try it. I suspect that it is those special 'Pasilla de Oaxaca' chiles.

    2. Can you identify the chile? Small, large, whole, meaty, hot?

        1. "An Oaxacan treat, smoked pasilla peppers are kept in a big jar at the back of the dining room. They arrive in their perfumy liquid, and will add a rich rich, leathery flavor to whatever they touch."
          Michael Stern

          http://www.roadfood.com/Reviews/Overv...
          The picture looks like the 'Pasilla de Oaxaca' (smoky, not as narrow as pasilla, but not as wide as ancho).

          1. Zarela Martinez, in a book about Oaxaca, has a recipe for Verduras en Vinagre.

            Vegetables are blanched and cooled (potato, carrot, cauliflower etc). The marinade contains onion, garlic, vinegar, Mexican oregano and Oaxacan pasillas (or cipotle).

            If the dish is from Oaxaca, another source is D Kennedy's coffeetable book.