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What Can I Do With A Pound of Excellent Quality Marzipan (and what exactly is the difference between almond paste and marzipan)

At a Danish bakery I picked up one pound of excellent homemade marzipan, the same thing they use in their tasty baked goods. In the back of my mind I was thinking of a cake that uses almond paste. After I got home I realized they aren't really the same thing. So, what should I do with it?

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  1. The www.odense.com and www.solofoods.com .websites have lots of recipes. Marzipan has more sugar and is firmer than almond paste. Canned almond filling is not as thick as almond paste.

    1. My understanding is that most commercial almond paste you can buy today in the states has a much higher amount of almonds in it, about twice as much, than marzipan. However I believe I heard Nigella say on one of her shows that this is not the case in Europe/England.

      This is a great article that I bookmarked a few years ago. I found it when researching recipes for almond croissants. Most recipes said to use the paste as it has much stronger almond flavor and better texture.

      http://www.rakemag.com/2002/11/myster...

      The only thing I know to do with marzipan is candy. Hope you get some good ideas!

      1. There is a Cake recipe these threads from long ago
        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/660395
        http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6603...
        and another here
        http://sweetapolita.com/2011/10/marzi...
        As Greygarious pointed out lot at the marzipan makes sites or do a search for "recipes using Marzipan"

          1. I have iced cakes with it, thinned with egg white. Particularly fruit cakes. And of course make little marzipan fruits with it.

            If you want to save some, I think you could probably freeze it in tupperware.

            Also, you could make cute little critters for easter! :)

              1. You can make it an inclusion in cakes, as long as it goes in cold so it won't melt into the batter as it bakes. I've done this in two ways. One is to cut it in little chunks and freeze them on a plate for an hour or more, then fold them into the cake batter as you would nuts or chocolate chips. The other is to make brownies or gingerbread with a layer of marzipan in the middle (a holiday tradition in my family). Use a recipe for an 8x8" pan with a not-too-thin batter. Before you start the making the batter, roll the marzipan out between two sheets of wax paper to an 8x8" square 1/4" thick and refrigerate. Spread half the batter in the pan, then peel one sheet of wax paper off the marzipan and invert it into the pan on top of the batter. Peel the second piece of wax paper off, spread the remaining batter in the pan, and bake.

                1. You can also plop small rounds of it on a baking sheet and throw in the oven for 15-20 min. Easiest almond cookies ever. Delicious at that.

                  1. How about a Sicilian Cassata?

                    Here is a recipe with pistachio marzipan, but I understand almond marzipan is perfectly acceptable: http://zoebakes.com/2011/04/20/easter...

                    1. There used to be a candy company, small, in New York City called The Elk Candy Company. They may still sell online,not sure. Anyway, they used to sell "dominoes"---marzipan cut into small rectanglular blocks with one half dipped in dark chocolate. Should be pretty easy to do. A while back Elk was online and was selling dominoes for $32 a pound. Delicious.