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Rare is bad...unfortunately.[moved from Great Lakes board]

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boagman Mar 3, 2013 06:15 PM

So over the last few years I've been watching what I eat a bit more closely, and one of the things I've determined about myself (biologically speaking) is that I can't really tolerate rare beef...nor really even medium.

I made this determination not solely based on last night, but on many nights in the past wherein different types of beef have been prepared medium for me, and I then have some type of gastronomic problem associated with it not long afterward...usually starting the same night. Last night I had a gorgeous ribeye, cooked to a perfect medium, and it was wonderful in the eating of it. That, of course, is where the fun ended. I won't bore you/gross you out with the details.

So, then, for me, blood is apparently bad. The issue comes up, then, in that I enjoy my beef with a bit of it. I tend to find that when I order beef well done, it's *destroyed*, quite often. That, and I don't want to give a kitchen carte blanche when it comes to that "XXXX takes no responsibility when you order higher than medium"...since they could easily just say, "Well, you ordered it well-done!"

I *think* I can handle a slight bit of pink in the middle of my steak, so medium-well may be on the table, but with steak prices being so high, I don't want to be spending good cash on something that's going to be tough and/or lousy, because that's not what I'm giving my permission for when I order a steak.

What to do? If it's ground beef, they can kill it and it probably won't bother me. When it's a pricier cut of beef, I'm reluctant.

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    VTB RE: boagman Mar 3, 2013 06:54 PM

    Prime beef (lots of fat to help offset moisture--water--loss), and precise cooking (so that not a single degree is endured more than necessary). The only way to precisely hit a single minimum temperature, THROUGHOUT, is to cook slowly. High tech oven or sous vide. Instead, maybe you can solve the internal issue. Are you on medications? Maybe a macrobiotic diet can make your plumbing more robust? Michigan has lots of delicious living fermented foods --Topor's pickles, The Brinery kimchi, Carncross Sugar Bush kraut, and several creameries...i know you're not a cheese guy but they have yogurt cultures that are more robust than store bought stuff. Also, don't get me started on the nice unpasteurized Michigan beers. Yum!
    PS-- I assume your dining companions have eaten the same meat you tried, without issue, right?

    2 Replies
    1. re: VTB
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      boagman RE: VTB Mar 3, 2013 07:08 PM

      It's me, VTB, and it's not just the steak form of beef. I used to get Redcoat Tavern's burger, and I'd order it medium. Time after time, I had problems with it. It got to the point where I actually stopped going there because I (wrongly) assumed that there was something wrong or unclean about their beef or cleaning policies. Nope. Just me...moving up to medium well has solved the issue. It would seem that the same applies to all beef.

      Even on Christmas Day, my mom prepared a *gorgeous* standing rib, which I enjoyed to the Nth degree. Then, of course, that very same day: The Judgment.

      I don't think it's an issue that can be solved without just avoiding rare stuff altogether, and that disappoints me a bit. I don't *want* my steak to be tough and dry, you know?

      1. re: boagman
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        VTB RE: boagman Mar 3, 2013 07:14 PM

        Boagman's area has lot's of Halal butchers. Is that similar in this regard? Actually I was unaware that Kosher beef was salted. I assumed it just was poultry. Interesting. One Stop Kosher in Southfield has many Kosher beef cuts. But, I've not seen local restaurants offer Kosher steaks. (Boagman seems to prefer eating out over home cooking.)

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      ganeden RE: boagman Mar 3, 2013 07:07 PM

      If your body cannot tolerate blood, you might wish to try kosher meat. It is soaked and salted with coarse salt in order to facilitate the removal of blood, then rinsed thoroughly of the extracted blood, and then treated normally. Rare will still be red, medium will still be pink, as functions of the denaturation of the protein, and not of retention of blood. It might be the best of both worlds.

      1. jlbwendt RE: boagman Mar 3, 2013 07:13 PM

        You know the juice/liquid in your steak is not blood, right?

        6 Replies
        1. re: jlbwendt
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          VTB RE: jlbwendt Mar 3, 2013 07:18 PM

          Jlbwendt, Can you PLEASE have this discussion with my wife. She hasn't allowed me to enjoy a rare steak, in peace, since we got married years ago.

          1. re: VTB
            jlbwendt RE: VTB Mar 4, 2013 03:33 PM

            Heh :) does she enjoy beef broth or gravy? Not the same as meat juice, but still closer than blood!

          2. re: jlbwendt
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            boagman RE: jlbwendt Mar 3, 2013 07:36 PM

            Well, while my wording may not have been technically correct, I'm sure that my point still came across properly, yes?

            The issue appears to be with beef that isn't almost completely without pink. Any red appears to be completely out of the picture now.

            1. re: boagman
              jlbwendt RE: boagman Mar 4, 2013 03:36 PM

              I've heard that the inability to digest beef (especially raw or rare) is a symptom of ulcerative colitis *

              *I'm not a doctor, nor do I play one on TV! :)

              And by the way, have you tried bison?

              1. re: jlbwendt
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                boagman RE: jlbwendt Mar 4, 2013 05:43 PM

                Bison is one type of game that I don't believe I've tried before, but if I have, it was in burger form. I'm not against it at all...but there just aren't that many bison-serving places here in the Detroit area.

                1. re: boagman
                  jlbwendt RE: boagman Mar 4, 2013 06:02 PM

                  It's becoming more popular and easier to find - at least here in Washington. Mostly in stores, rather than restaurants though. Good luck finding a solution! More braised dishes perhaps? :)

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            gan911 RE: boagman Mar 3, 2013 07:17 PM

            does this also happen with lamb? how about duck?

            3 Replies
            1. re: gan911
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              boagman RE: gan911 Mar 3, 2013 07:35 PM

              Gan911, I honestly couldn't tell you. I do eat lamb and duck, but cannot remember the last time I had one of them rare, or even rare-ish.

              1. re: boagman
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                VTB RE: boagman Mar 3, 2013 07:51 PM

                Dr. Gan prescribes you one order of raw kibbe and order of rare lamb chops at Cedarlands, stat! But, don't call him in morning.

                1. re: VTB
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                  boagman RE: VTB Mar 3, 2013 08:06 PM

                  Heh. Nice one!

            2. viperlush RE: boagman Mar 4, 2013 05:37 PM

              I noticed the same think a few years ago. Since then I have significantly decreased the amount of beef that I eat and type. When I do eat it it is well done (stir fry, ground beef, braised, etc.) and in a small quantity. Unfortunately, like you I enjoy my steaks rare, so I just gave up on them. The positive is my grocery bill is smaller and BF gets his fill of beef when we visit his parents.

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