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Thermomix vs Vitamix

hungryann Feb 28, 2013 05:25 PM

Does anyone have experience with these machines and can compare them. I know the thermomix has more functions but not sure it's really worth it to spend the extra money. They are both quite pricey so I want to get the most useful appliance for me.

  1. c
    Corkie_9 Mar 20, 2014 07:33 AM

    Purchased a Thermomix several years especially because of limited counter space. Use it for wide variety of things from banana nut breads to almond butter to mayonnaise, One unique use is for sous vide. For example, package of beef or chicken, 60 deg. at speed 2, results are near perfect. Temperature but not be the expected 65, on my machine it is 62 and close enough. .

    1 Reply
    1. re: Corkie_9
      m
      MacGuffin Mar 20, 2014 10:33 AM

      I think it's unrealistic to expect the exact temperature on such an appliance (even if it is German!). You're confirming that several degrees in either direction should be just fine.

    2. mbfant Jan 27, 2014 09:08 AM

      I have a Thermomix (called Bimby in Italy, where I live). It was a gift -- I'd probably never have spent the money. I don't know anything about Vitamix. The Bimby cooks. I mainly use it for soups -- I can do everything in one place, chop, cook, puree. It grates parmigiano beautifully (not a reason to buy it). It is good with dough. It has a steamer thing you can put on top of it while you are cooking something else in the main container. It makes fabulous mashed potatoes (way better than the fp and it cooks the potatoes in the same place). What I don't like is that you can't see what's going on inside since the container is opaque. That means you are more recipe-dependent (run it for x seconds at velocity y -- very Teutonic) than with a food processor. I use both, probably more the Bimby than the fp, but I wouldn't get rid of the fp. I have not explored its range, but someday I will. It's a useful appliance and well made and easy to clean.

      3 Replies
      1. re: mbfant
        m
        MacGuffin Jan 27, 2014 10:51 AM

        "(run it for x seconds at velocity y -- very Teutonic)"
        LOL and made in France, to boot!

        FWIW, I know for a fact that the Vitamix isn't for mashed potatoes (not an issue for me because I'm one of those deviants who actually prefers instant). And I'll never give up my food processor, even after 25+ years of Vita-Mix ownership. It's a Japanese Cuisinart that was exclusive to Williams-Sonoma and it performs some functions that my Vita-Prep can't (e.g. mincing, powdering nuts without turning them to butter). A friend borrowed it for holiday cooking and is still having fun with it (they have their own Vitamix). I REALLY cherish my appliances. :)

        I think I read that "Thermomix" can't be used in some countries due to copyright issues, hence "Bimby."

        1. re: MacGuffin
          mbfant Jan 27, 2014 01:35 PM

          "I think I read that "Thermomix" can't be used in some countries due to copyright issues, hence "Bimby.""

          Yes, Italy and Portugal already had appliances called Thermomix, which, though they were very different, precluded use of the name. Thermomix apparently already had the nickname Bimby because it was originally conceived for making baby food, so as a result this no-nonsense sturdy German machine (it IS Teutonic, made by Vorwerk) has to go around with that ridiculous name.

          1. re: mbfant
            m
            MacGuffin Jan 27, 2014 02:00 PM

            Oh, I know it's German! I did a lot of research on it when I became aware of its existence several years ago, including joining the Australian Thermomix forum (an awful lot of nice folks there). But the manufacturing, as I recall, is done in la belle France. And I agree, "Bimby" is a silly name.

      2. breadchick Jan 26, 2014 11:56 AM

        I use my Vitamix daily, sometimes a few times a day. I make kale smoothies, soups for the freezer, milkshakes for my husband, etc. I love it, and glad I upgraded from an old KitchenAid blender which needed replacing.

        Fresh peaches (in season) for ice cream!

        I made some curried carrot soup for a party, and everyone wondered how I got the soup so silky smooth and light. I told them "Vitamix!"

        31 Replies
        1. re: breadchick
          SnackHappy Jan 26, 2014 12:00 PM

          So how does it compare to a Thermomix?

          1. re: SnackHappy
            breadchick Jan 26, 2014 12:17 PM

            Sorry, but I can't compare, since I've never used it. I provided my experience with Vitamix and figured someone would jump in with their experience with Thermomix. I would be interested in learning about it, and then could compare the two.

            1. re: breadchick
              l
              Leilastar Jan 26, 2014 12:41 PM

              Please see my reply above as I have a Thermomix. Can't make hot soups with it. But can do everything else.

              1. re: Leilastar
                breadchick Jan 26, 2014 01:03 PM

                I also went to the Thermomix website and checked out the videos. Looks like an awesome machine!!

                1. re: breadchick
                  l
                  Leilastar Jan 26, 2014 01:08 PM

                  It is a fantastic machine. It doesn't warm up soups but I kind of prefer stove top soups anyway and just blend them in the Thermomix. I haven't tried chopping ice yet, but will do so soon.

                2. re: Leilastar
                  m
                  MacGuffin Jan 26, 2014 02:09 PM

                  You can with the newer ones. But that's because they actually heat; it's not done with friction.

                  1. re: MacGuffin
                    l
                    Leilastar Jan 26, 2014 02:37 PM

                    Really that's great news. Ive had mine for years now and it works like a charm.

                    1. re: Leilastar
                      m
                      MacGuffin Jan 26, 2014 03:39 PM

                      I'm guessing they don't have a trade-in program, which is a nice thing about Vitamix. I'd love to get my hands on a Thermomix. :)

                  2. re: Leilastar
                    SnackHappy Jan 26, 2014 08:03 PM

                    But the point of the Thermomix, amongst other things, is that it can cook. There are scores of soup recipes for the thing.

                    http://www.recipecommunity.com.au/soups

                    1. re: SnackHappy
                      e
                      ErinW Jan 27, 2014 03:43 AM

                      That's right. You can also make stew (without turning it into meatloaf - you reverse the direction of the blades set at a low revolution so they stir, and then heat at 90 or 100 degrees. One neat option is also to blend a veggie sauce, like Tomato sauce, and then using the basket strainer, cook pasta inside at the same time. In theory you could place the steamer on top and steam some meatballs as well or broccoli or shrimp but I haven't done that myself. I like that the temperature settings are accurate. It allows for fussy things like tempering chocolate. I also use it to knead my bread dough. It does a great job with baguette and pizza doughs.

                      1. re: ErinW
                        m
                        MacGuffin Jan 27, 2014 06:04 AM

                        "I like that the temperature settings are accurate."

                        Just to play devil's advocate, I understand there are hot spots, the scale can be fiddly, the blades can dull (Vitamix blades are already pretty dull), and the warranty isn't as good. That doesn't mean I don't want one, just that forewarned is forearmed. I'm hoping that by the time I'm able to afford one, there'll have been an upgrade that addresses some of these issues. It's a very expensive appliance.

                        1. re: MacGuffin
                          e
                          ErinW Jan 27, 2014 07:29 AM

                          Sure the blades can dullen. Like the Vitamix, they aren't that sharp to start because it relies on the torque/power of the machine to chop rather than the blade. It hasn't happened to me in 3 years though. It depends what you chop, I imagine. The warranty is fine. 2 years, I think, although the Cdn one might be 1 year. I haven't had any need to use it. I have not noticed a hot spot - after having 2 machines (one in Europe, one in Canada). I make my kids hot chocolate (with real chocolate that I grind before I add the milk) so I think I would notice it (I do notice hotspots in my Aeroccino). The scale can be fiddly sometimes - the machine has to be on a solid countertop. What I like best about the scale, however, is that I can measure 100g of sugar, mix it, then reset the scale to zero, and add 100g of flour without having to dump the sugar out. In fact, I LOVE that feature. The other amazing feature is the automatic turnoff of the heat. If you program it to make soup, for example, and you have to run out to the store/school/whatever, it will cook the soup for the programmed time, then turn itself off and keep stirring it until you turn the machine off, so you don't get any burned bits but it stays hot. It is a brutally expensive machine, but I use mine almost every day and while I tried to live without, I found I was too dependant because it just made cooking so easy.

                          1. re: ErinW
                            m
                            MacGuffin Jan 27, 2014 10:51 AM

                            Yes, but no one ever complains about dull Vitamix blades--stripped bearings, yes, but that's covered under warranty which is 5 - 7 years, sometimes 8 without buying an extension and shipping is paid both ways as well. And unless there's actual user error, everything is covered, no questions asked. That's a big difference between a year or two OR the number of cycles (which is something I believe both Blendtec and Thermomix use as a determination of covered repair). I also understand that non-warranty Thermomix repairs are obscenely expensive whereas it's a flat-rate situation with Vitamix.

                            1. re: MacGuffin
                              e
                              ErinW Mar 19, 2014 08:25 AM

                              The thing with the Thermomix is that the blades are dull to start with. The blades aren't what cuts, it's the torque (as it was explained to me). You can run your finger along the blade of a new machine, and it won't cut you. I can't speak to the costs of repair because I haven't needed to repair mine (in spite of daily use over several years). The only thing I can say is that there are lots of people on the web that have their Thermomix machines for 20+ years. In their cookbooks, they list the settings for the older versions as well - and those are OLD! I don't think the question is whether Vitamix or Thermomix is better. They are very different machines....It's like comparing a food processor with a blender. On the surface, they are both used for mixing, but they aren't the same.

                              1. re: ErinW
                                m
                                MacGuffin Mar 19, 2014 01:53 PM

                                I agree that they're very different although it would seem that neither has sharp blades. It's not as though you can steam or sauté with a Vitamix . . . or weigh, for that matter. And I reiterate: despite happy and longterm Vita-Mix ownership, I'd love to have a Thermomix, too!

                                1. re: MacGuffin
                                  m
                                  Marilla Mar 19, 2014 08:00 PM

                                  Left on Chow site 20 March 2014:

                                  I debated for some time whether to get a Vitamix or a Thermomix - but as I'm not (or, actually, wasn't...) a great fan of either soups or smoothies I decided to go for a Thermomix. Gosh am I glad I did! It was, of course, a big investment - but not if you compare it to the cost of a new oven or built-in hob etc. (and these lose their value immediately). Since I've had my Thermomix (bought in 2012) I've used it every day for at least one thing, and I've easily saved the amount I've paid. After I'd been using it for a few months I sold my blender (a Waring, so it hadn't lost its value even after quite a few years), my breadmaker (a Panasonic, so a reasonable second-hand value), pressure cooker (a Kuhn Rikon, ditto), my rice cooker (a Sanyo ditto), and my wand blender (a Bamix special edition with all accessories and therefore also ditto) so already the initial cost was very much defrayed.

                                  The Thermomix has been a revelation because I simply didn't realise that the way in which food is 'processed' made such a huge difference to how it tasted. Despite my antipathy to soups I now really enjoy soup occasionally - because basically the soups I make with the Thermomix are raw. I just blend vegetables and then heat them, along with stock (which is made from raw vegetables in the Thermomix, according to the recipe book which came with it) and, as the Thermomix can heat precisely to 37°C (i.e. 'raw' temperature), these soups are really vibrant and exciting - nothing like the boring stuff I used to associate with the word 'soup'. I also blend avocado or banana with live juices (from a single augur juicer) to make smoothies, and I really enjoy these despite my original antipathy to smoothies.

                                  With the Thermomix I make porridge from scratch (including cutting the beautiful local organic jumbo oats available from my local organic healthfood store), bread (including grinding the organic spelt grains), and pancakes, drop scones and the like (made from uncooked organic shortgrain brown rice). Vegetables for salads are beautifully cut in an instant, cauliflower 'rice' is a delicious accompaniment to meals ensuring that they are completely non-carbohydrate, and amazing 'breakfast balls' made of nuts, dates and lots of lovely cacao (nibs, powder and butter) among other goodies are so unbelievably delicious that I've actually served them as a very successful after-dinner sweetmeat (in very much smaller form!).

                                  The Thermomix roasts spices to perfection - and you can also grind spices etc. which means they are so much fresher and tastier than buying them already ground (cumin, cardamom, cinammon, ginger, garlic etc.). You just grind at the start of the food preparation before adding other ingredients in the recipe. As the thing is so easy to clean, even if you just want some ginger or garlic or suchlike to add to a salad or something for which you're not using the Thermomix, it's still worth doing and saves one heck of a lot of effort.

                                  Steamed vegetables - never originally a particular a favourite of mine - are easy to make delicious as they can be steamed just right (which my rice cooker could do extremely well so I had high expectations) and with some of the (Thermomix-made) stock in the steaming water - yum!

                                  When there is a party or barbecue etc. I can take along special rice (it's easy to make several versions: white, brown, Basmati, all with vegetable pieces and spices or stock included), homemade bread rolls, sweetmeats, etc. If there is a fête I can produce the famous stock or sweet chilli sauce or suchlike - and this is all coming from a serious non-cook! (When I was at school we had a compulsory year of cookery classes, after which the Domestic Science teacher was extremely glad to let me go, believe me.)

                                  Re the sharp blade thing - yes, I agree that if you run your fingers over the blades they don't seem sharp. However the abovementioned Breakfast Balls contain a thick mix of almonds, dates, walnuts, cacao butter, etc. etc. which is actually hard work to stir with a tough spatula (like the very rigid one which comes with the Thermomix) - and the Thermomix easily makes it all into a smooth, sticky blend which can easily be rolled into smooth round balls. I left a good-quality spoon in the bowl on one occasion and then set the Thermomix going; the blades survived intact (with a few nicks in them which don't seem to make the slightest difference to performance) - but the spoon looked as if it had been several rounds with Uri Geller and Edward Scissorhands and was a complete write-off.

                                  As you can see, I'm a convert. I have absolutely no patience with anything which doesn't perform (please do not psychoanalyse that statement...), but the Thermomix does. It's difficult to say why it makes food preparation and cooking actually fun (and, believe me, I never thought I'd use 'cooking' and 'fun' in the same sentence without it including 'not much'), but this is what happens. It's the simplicity, and the speed, and the fact that you can put in the various ingredients in order each time (‘put x, y and z into the bowl and blend x seconds at speed y, then cook at temperature z for...’) and it all turns out perfectly every time - so no wastage of your beautifully fresh and carefully selected and/or harvested food. It's the joy of being congratulated for tasty, healthy meals and snacks which you feel you've almost cheated in producing. It's not having to faff around with thermometers and scales and loads of separate pieces of equipment (blenders, steamers, breadmakers, pans - you can make yoghurt and paneer, by the way, which I have). But it's also some sort of magic that one piece of equipment can do so much in the way of taking ingredients and turning them into something else.

                                  Drawbacks? The price, of course - but my stars this is more than just another piece of kitchen equipment because it really does replace several others (and in my case quite pricey others). Also, you do need to have a warmer of some sort (mind you, I find this is an essential piece of equipment in the kitchen anyway if every part of a meal is going to be served at the right temperature all at the same time). And I think that's the lot, because the usual drawback of food processors, that they're difficult to clean and reassemble, definitely doesn't obtain here.

                                  The great thing is that you can have a demonstration of the Thermomix in your own home and ask lots of awkward questions (as I did), and you don't have to buy. Get a few friends round and they can ask awkward questions as well, you can have a bit of a meal cooked for you (you have to supply the ingredients) and it's an interesting morning or afternoon.

                                  Highly recommended!

                                  1. re: Marilla
                                    m
                                    MacGuffin Mar 19, 2014 08:09 PM

                                    "The great thing is that you can have a demonstration of the Thermomix in your own home and ask lots of awkward questions (as I did), and you don't have to buy."

                                    Not in the U.S. at this point.

                                    1. re: MacGuffin
                                      m
                                      Marilla Mar 19, 2014 09:19 PM

                                      Wow - I didn't realise that. Any chance of you getting over to Canada for a demonstration?!?

                                      1. re: Marilla
                                        m
                                        MacGuffin Mar 20, 2014 06:45 AM

                                        I wish! No time and (perhaps more importantly) no spare funds! But I WILL have one someday! From what I've seen of the online videos and their sites, the Canadian reps seem like really nice folks, too. I'd be happy to do business with them (especially now that the rate of exchange is favorable). Having grown up in Detroit, I feel a kinship with Canada anyway because there was (and still is for those there) a lot of backing-and-forthing between Windsor and Detroit through the tunnel/over the bridge. Lots of Canadian coins given in change when I was a kid! :)

                      2. re: SnackHappy
                        l
                        Leilastar Jan 27, 2014 02:41 PM

                        Thank you, I had no idea you could make soups with the Thermomix. I checked out the site and definetly will make them. Much appreciate.

                        1. re: Leilastar
                          SnackHappy Jan 27, 2014 07:16 PM

                          That's astounding. Fifteen years of ownership and you never wondered what the temperature dial was for?

                          1. re: SnackHappy
                            m
                            MacGuffin Jan 27, 2014 07:28 PM

                            ...or what the "thermo" part of the name referred to? :)

                            Maybe this is why Vorwerk insists on home demos.

                          2. re: Leilastar
                            l
                            Leilastar Jan 28, 2014 09:20 AM

                            Have you ever crushed ice with the thermomix?

                            1. re: Leilastar
                              e
                              ErinW Mar 19, 2014 08:20 AM

                              I do it often for drinks. I also make a wicked fruit ice-cream which is frozen banana, frozen strawberries and an ice cube or two (sometimes, but not always). It comes out like soft-serve frozen yogurt, just minus everything that isn't banana or strawberries. My kids love it, but it melts quickly!

                              1. re: ErinW
                                m
                                MacGuffin Mar 19, 2014 01:48 PM

                                That one can be done in the Vitamix as well, including the rapid melt-time. :) What's cool about the Thermomix, at least from the YouTube videos I've watched, is that you don't need any liquid--you need a little for Vitamix ice cream.

                        2. re: Leilastar
                          m
                          Marilla Mar 19, 2014 07:37 AM

                          You can definitely make soups in the Thermomix - it's one of the (many) things it's really good at doing!

                          1. re: Marilla
                            m
                            MacGuffin Mar 19, 2014 08:08 AM

                            I'm guessing one of the nice things about making soup in it is that if you're not making a puréed soup, it can cook and stir without the ingredients losing their integrity.

                            1. re: MacGuffin
                              e
                              ErinW Mar 19, 2014 08:18 AM

                              I make soup about 4-5 times per week, and I hate pureed soup so it's always nice and chunky. I throw in half an onion to the thermomix bowl, chop for 2 seconds, then throw in carrots, zucchini, whatever veggies or herbs are looking sorry, and blend for about 4 seconds. Then I fill the bowl with water, and cook for 13 minutes, throwing in a stock cube and occasionally some frozen meatballs. All in all, it takes me about 1 minute of attention, and then I leave it until the timer alarm goes off. I don't know how I'd manage without, to be honest!

                    2. re: breadchick
                      l
                      Leilastar Jan 26, 2014 12:02 PM

                      Well that's one difference that the Thermomix doesn't do is make warm soups by the speed of the blades. At least I don't it does.

                      1. re: Leilastar
                        e
                        ErinW Jan 27, 2014 03:49 AM

                        You set the desired temperature on the Thermomix. 114 degrees C if you want to sauté onions, 70 C for chocolate, 100 C for soup, 37C or 50C to proof yeast. It all depends on what you are cooking. The nice thing is when you whip cream or egg whites with the whisk insert, there is no heat unless you want it.

                        1. re: ErinW
                          l
                          Leilastar Jan 27, 2014 02:42 PM

                          Fantastic info. Ive only been using mine for blending soups. Much appreciate.

                    3. l
                      Leilastar Jan 26, 2014 11:41 AM

                      I just made cashew butter with my Thermomix which Ive had for about 15 years. I think it can stand up to anything the Vitamix can do.

                      1. rmarisco Oct 5, 2013 08:06 PM

                        personally, i'm all about the customer service on just about any appliance... what if it breaks??? can you get replacement parts easily??? i know it doesn't happen often... but, at least in my house, it's GOING to happen at some point!

                        1. e
                          ErinW Oct 4, 2013 09:36 AM

                          Thermomix is so much more than a blender. You weigh, chop, whip, cook, steam. I don't use anything else. The only thing I wish it would do is grate carrots - otherwise, I've never found it lacking. I make shu mai, soup, risotto, cake batters, ganaches, bread flours and doughs etc with it. When I moved from Europe, I went 3 months without to see if I really needed it, and discovered that indeed I did. It cooks and stirs on a timer, so you don't need to hover over it every second, and when the time is reached, it shuts off the heat, and just keeps stirring. Awesome stuff - you have to see it to believe it really - and in spite of the price tag, it's worth every penny.

                          1. f
                            fryebrandon1 Apr 17, 2013 08:13 PM

                            All I can speak of is the Vitamix. It has been my God Send. I've been using it every morning for kale smoothies, plus I use it for making dough and desserts. The Vitamix also comes with a 30 day money back guarantee. Go for it!

                            www.forkstofeet.com

                            1. pikawicca Mar 5, 2013 02:23 PM

                              I live in the U.S. and have been trying to buy a Thermomix for months. Seems to be impossible, despite a NYT article on the subject last year.

                              3 Replies
                              1. re: pikawicca
                                DeeAgeaux Mar 5, 2013 02:31 PM

                                Thermomix is going to Canada first. Should be here shortly.

                                BTW In the US, Vitamix far outsells any other comparable machine in the restaurant market.

                                1. re: DeeAgeaux
                                  pikawicca Mar 5, 2013 02:37 PM

                                  I believe that Thermomix is already in Canada. (I love my Vitamix, but the Thermomix sounds very cool.)

                                  1. re: pikawicca
                                    SnackHappy Mar 5, 2013 03:16 PM

                                    Yes, it's been available here for a few years.

                              2. DeeAgeaux Mar 5, 2013 02:21 PM

                                Yes, the Vitamix 750 can knead dough. Work as a grinder, food processor, food mixer ,ice cream machine etc . It can also make soups, cook oatmeal and make hollandaise sauce. It can heat up to making and boiling soup through friction if you want to.

                                Something a standard blender you buy at Wal-Mart can't do.

                                It can do all those functions except steam food and weight it as you pour it in.

                                1. r
                                  Rigmaster Mar 5, 2013 11:51 AM

                                  They're two different machines. Themo's more of a complete prep appliance. Vita-mix is more of the ultimate blender appliance.

                                  Also, ever notice how just about all products compare themselves to VM? There's a reason. It's the best.

                                  2 Replies
                                  1. re: Rigmaster
                                    m
                                    MacGuffin Dec 5, 2013 12:30 PM

                                    Bingo! They're very different. And yes, there's a lot of product comparison. I had very mixed feelings when I discovered recently that KoMo (a manufacturer I admire of high-end stone mills for home use) has now created a power blender that specifically compare itself to . . . guess what? And in German.

                                    I've been lusting after a Thermomix for several years now despite being a (very) longtime Vitamix owner but then, I'm an appliance junkie. :)

                                    1. re: Rigmaster
                                      m
                                      MacGuffin Dec 5, 2013 12:34 PM

                                      Thermomix has been in Canada for quite some time now, definitely for more than the 3+ years that I've been aware of its existence and started researching it.

                                    2. DeeAgeaux Mar 5, 2013 01:57 AM

                                      The notion that the Vitamix is just a blender is absolute nonsense.

                                      Thermomix is a Vitamix 750 plus steamer and an extremely accurate scale. Is that worth $1k ?

                                      Then the Vitamix 5200s at Costco for $375 is a hell of a deal.

                                      Advantages of 750 over 5200(s)

                                      There is a tension sensor on the blade that corresponds to the preset modes so the blender knows at what speed and how long to rotate for puree, frozen treat or whatever. I like the auto wash preset.

                                      Without tamper in place, the 750 will fit under standard kitchen cabinets.

                                      Because of the overall design of the carafe you will need to use the tamper less often.

                                      The cooling fan works at all speeds on the 750 while on the 5200 it only works on high speed.

                                      It has .2 more horsepower, longer blades and operates at lower rpm therefore most people perceive significantly less noise. It depends on Kitchen acoustics and your particular ears but generally lower noise.

                                      1 Reply
                                      1. re: DeeAgeaux
                                        SnackHappy Mar 5, 2013 11:22 AM

                                        "The notion that the Vitamix is just a blender is absolute nonsense"

                                        In that case, what is it then? It's a blender. It's a very powerful and well-built blender, but it's still a blender.

                                        Here's one for you: The notion that the "Thermomix is a Vitamix 750 plus steamer and an extremely accurate scale" is absolute nonsense. The Thermomix has a heating element. It can make hollandaise sauce, cook oatmeal, knead dough, blah, blah,blah...

                                        I'm not a fan of the Thermomix. I think it's overkill for the home cook, and I hate how it's marketed, but it's more than a glorified blender.

                                      2. SnackHappy Mar 4, 2013 12:42 PM

                                        I don't know if they're really comparable. First off, the Thermomix is almost four times the price of a Vitamix. Secondly, the Thermomix is a multifunction machine and the Vitamix is just a blender. If you're hesitating between one or the other, then you don't need a Thermomix.

                                        1. k
                                          kimcantcook Mar 2, 2013 01:37 PM

                                          I can't offer a comparison on both, but I just bought a Vitamix from QVC. It doesn't have a lot of buttons: On/Off and Hi/Low. I've used it a few times to liquify fruits and veggies (I'm on a health kick, and that's the only way I'm gonna get them in my body!). I have a Cuisinart blender, but haven't used it in about 4 years. It just couldn't handle more than mixing a Rita. The Vitamix I got is a beast for sure. I'm a little afraid of it actually. Would probably liquify my laptop if I threw that in!

                                          I guess it all depends on what you want out of it. I wanted to do healthy "smoothies", make soups and sorbet. My particular vitamix came with a "dry" attachment that I can grind my own grains and make bread if I ever wanted to. My advice is to research research research! If you buy it and it isn't living up to your expectations, get it from a store (or the Q) where you can return it for your other option.

                                          1 Reply
                                          1. re: kimcantcook
                                            hungryann Mar 4, 2013 08:39 AM

                                            Thanks for your review. I am leaning more towards the vitamix. Which model did you get?

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