HOME > Chowhound > General Topics >

Discussion

Are there any American Restaurants in Europe?

  • 177
  • Share

I am not referring to chains, rather restaurants that serve calssic american diner food or BBQ or Southern soul food? I was talking to a German co-worker and he said you will nto find an Americn nor an English restaurant in Germany. Mexican, Irish Pubs, Turkish, Greek, Italian, but not American.

The other noteable comment was there are no chain restaurants in Germany. They don't have a KFC, McDonalds, Olive Garden equivalent. No House of Wurst. I find that very interesting.

jb

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
Posting Guidelines | FAQs | Feedback
Cancel
  1. Huh? No McDonald's in Germany? No KFC? Your friend must not get out much. There are lots of chain restaurants in Germany (Subway too).

    1. I lived in Germany from 2010-2012 and there are DEF chain restaurants there.

      Also, your co-worker apparently doesn't know how to use Google: http://bit.ly/V6s4kS

      6 Replies
      1. re: cfarivar

        Und Wienerwald:

        http://www.wienerwald.eu/

        1. re: ferret

          I loved Wienerwald in both Germany and in Austria.

          1. re: shoo bee doo

            When in Austria I treasured Wienerwald for its salad bar, not common in Europe, and its chicken was delicious.

            1. re: Querencia

              Heute bleibt die Kueche kalt, gehennwir zum Wienerwald!

              1. re: Gretchen

                Was that their slogan?

                Sadly, the Viennese friend who wanted to invite me to the original Wienerwald (the woods, not the chain) died a few years ago

        2. re: cfarivar

          Hell, I lived in Germany from 1968-1972 and within 10 miles there was a KFC, an A&W, and a Dairy Queen. Granted, I lived on a honking big US military base but all those places were off-base.

        3. They had US chains when I was there last year.
          They may not have a house of wurst but they do have the WienerWald chain.

          http://www.wienerwald.de/restaurants/...

          1. They don't have a KFC or McDonald's equivalent because they have KFC and McDonald's in Germany (and France and most of the rest of Europe).

            But yes, in bigger cities you can find American diner food (Paris has The Real McCoy, Breakast in America, and Joe Allen, among others) Barbecue (at least one each in Paris and London) -- don't know about soul food - never looked (I'm busy eating the local specialities....)

            There's Quick, the Belgian-born hamburger chain you'll find all across France, Belgium, and Luxembourg.

            Germany has *lots* of chains -- Nordsee (fish), Wienerwald (chicken, despite the name), and Vapiano (Italian), as well as Pizza Hut, Domino's, Subway...many regional chains of bakeries, wursts (MeisterBock), fries....

            France also has Buffalo Grill and Hippopotamus, both of which are riffs on the Bennigan's/TGI Friday's theme, and Leon de Bruxelles and La Criee to balance out the Red Lobster theme

            1. 5 minutes on the internet put paid to the above statement. I think you would have to be blind not to see a Subway franchise almost anywhere you were. Wendy's did leave, but I don't know why. There were always more Germans than US troops and families in line.

              1. When I was in Germany I remember Italian and Chinese but no American restaurants, other than the chains you mentioned.

                12 Replies
                1. re: rasputina

                  "American restaurants" can be found in every American hotel chain like the Hilton. I recall the very American menu at the Paris Hilton one July 4th.

                  1. re: dpan

                    Not necessarily. The Hilton in the city in my metro area (Manchester) has a cuisine fixed very firmly in British food and, in particular, local ingredients. For instance, Cheshire reared beef fillet with celeriac puree and roasted beetroot.

                    1. re: dpan

                      Along with Haters, the Hilton that I most often stay at in the UK (Hilton Park Lane), has three restaurants: Galvins, a French-inspired 1 Michelin-starred restaurant, a Trader Vic's, which is along the US lines of that group of restaurants, and Podium, which is more casual, and British-inspired.

                      I think that it will depend greatly on the exact Hilton.

                      Hunt

                      1. re: Bill Hunt

                        Hunt - I like that typo. hope our British poster does too!

                        so happy to hear there are still Trader Vic's and pu-pu platters out there. gives one a sense of continuity in the world.

                        1. re: hill food

                          Sorry, but I missed the typo. Can you point that out to me?

                          Thanks,

                          Hunt

                          1. re: Bill Hunt

                            nope! sorry, gotta be left marked as 'STET'!

                            1. re: Bill Hunt

                              Along with Haters
                              ----------------------------
                              We'll assume you meant Harters. Unless that assumption . . .

                              1. re: gaffk

                                Oops, there was a missing "r" in there. That is what I get for typing, after declaring Wine-thirty.

                                Hope that John will forgive me...

                                Hunt

                            2. re: hill food

                              Typo much enjoyed, hill food.

                              I suspect Podium must be a Hilton branding in the UK, as the Manchester restaurant is also called that.

                              1. re: Harters

                                We have never stayed at any Hilton properties in the UK, beyond Mayfair. Two others (Half Moon St), and the old Mews, did not have such a restaurant, but once one gets beyond the confines of London, it might well be part of the marque?

                                Thanks for the mention of the Manchester property.

                                Now, if I understand correctly, the US-modeled Trader Vic's, is only at the Hilton Park Lane, Mayfair. Is that correct?

                                Appreciated, and will NOT forget the "r,"

                                Hunt

                                1. re: Bill Hunt

                                  Bill

                                  I've never seen a Trader Vic's so presume it may just be at Mayfair.

                                  Now, I must share a story with you about getting names wrong. One of our senior government ministers - a cabinet member - shares his surname with you. He was about to be welcomed onto a live national BBC radio broadcast - the presenter saying " After the news, we're going to be talking to Jeremy C..." http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2010/...

                                  1. re: Harters

                                    Obviously, the surname "Hunt," is not as easy, as one might think.

                                    For some reason, I become remembered as "Robert Hunter," instead of "Bill Hunt." Why"? I cannot imagine, but that is just how it is. Should I wish to enter into a life of crime, or intrigue, I would get a passport in the name of Robert Hunter, and then go about my business.

                                    Again, sorry about dropping the "r," but it MUST have been the wine... That is my story, and I am sticking with it.

                                    Hunt

                      2. To clarify he said they have McDonalds, but not their own chains and it looks like my German co-worker does not know what he's talking about. Thanks.

                        jb

                        44 Replies
                        1. re: JuniorBalloon

                          *snerk*

                          Or he's from a smaller town -- in larger cities (Cologne, Munich, Frankfurt) a walk down the main shopping streets is a study in fast-food chains, as are big-city train stations.

                          and don't forget the ever-present German fast food -- doner kebabs (delicious, in that "I can't believe I'm eating this" way)

                          1. re: sunshine842

                            Clarify again. They have lots of american fast food chains, but not their own, home-grown chains serving German food. His contention is that you will find lots of shops that may have a place or two, but not a country wide chain like we have. A German chain, Apparently Wienerwald is Austrian (he informed me of this with a bit of a smirk ;o) )

                            Though obviously there are many places serving American food aside from our chain outlets

                            jb

                            1. re: JuniorBalloon

                              ask him about Nordsee, which is German and is the largest seafood chain in Europe, with over 400 outlets.

                              http://www.nordsee.com/en/themen/36/T...

                              In English, no less.

                              Not sure that "but it's not German" is really much of a defense in a country where fast-food joints stand cheek-to-jowl in the bigger cities.

                              There's enough fast food in Germany that there's a word for it: Imbiss.

                              1. re: sunshine842

                                Nordsee will make one nostalgic for Red Lobster.

                                1. re: ferret

                                  well that's a sad comment.

                                  1. re: ferret

                                    Yeah, right.

                                    1. re: ferret

                                      I'd take the chilled seafood sandwiches and marinated herring at Nordsee over anything at Red Lobster.

                                      I actually wish we had something like Nordsee in Canada.

                                      1. re: prima

                                        One of our xmas eve traditions at my mom's house was to buy an array of seafood salads, marinated shrimp, mussels and other delights at Nordsee to have a bountiful buffet to snack on.

                                        1. re: linguafood

                                          I love that stuff, which is also found in the Netherlands and the Nordic countries.

                                    2. re: sunshine842

                                      He wasn't saying there is no fast food, just no chains. He did later metnion the Nordsee seafood chain. Honestly I'm not sure what was behind his comments. At the face of it, if what he was saying was true it was just interesting to me as we have tons of chains. Seems to be what we do and they don't, at least for the most part. Not sure if it says anything about cultural differences. They have more Mom and Pop type places? What does that say?

                                      jb

                                      1. re: JuniorBalloon

                                        The fact that nearly all the major US chains are represented there pretty much counters the argument that they have "more mom and pop places," just fewer homegrown chains.

                                        1. re: ferret

                                          yeah, I remember all the quick and easy Wurst und Pomme-Frites stands, but they weren't franchises, all indies.

                                          I stayed with a family in a smallish town (Hagen) for a month in 1983, it was big enough for the usual-suspect chains, but the host parents would sooner eat their own shoes than darken the doors and their children were forbidden to even consider the thought. "it is, how you say, not real food"

                                        2. re: JuniorBalloon

                                          There's also "Le CroBag", a pretty decent sandwich chain which I believe is national.

                                          Maredo is a steakhouse chain, tho it thankfully serves Argentinian beef, not American.

                                          That said, yes, there are far more single owner restaurants in Germany overall than there are chains or franchises.

                                          There are any number of "American" restaurants (as in *real* restaurants) in larger cities. Berlin alone has a couple "Cajun" (square quotes intentional) restaurants, a new BBQ spot, a highly popular burger joint run by two NYers, and a relatively new farm-to-table modern American cuisine place.

                                          There are also diner-style places, however, those are generally geared at tourists who for some reason enjoy crappy food, as long as there are jukeboxes and "American" atmosphere (red shiny booths, etc.).

                                          Where exactly did your colleague grow up?

                                        3. re: sunshine842

                                          Oh wow, Nordsee...we used to eat there when my dad was stationed in (at the time) West Germany. Good memories!

                                          Definitely Imbiss, but no such chain.

                                          In the same prehistoric time frame, there was a chain of terrible "American" burger restaurants in England called Wimpy's. So very bad.

                                          1. re: coney with everything

                                            coney - I made the mistake once (once) of ordering a bacon cheeseburger at a Wimpy's in Luxembourg. it was to a diner's what a Jack-in-the-Box taco is to a taqueria's.

                                            in my defense I was a buzzed and hungry 18 YO.

                                            1. re: hill food

                                              I ate there in London a couple of times as a teenager; sadly I was with a bunch of fellow teens who only wanted American food. YUCK

                                              1. re: coney with everything

                                                heh! I refuse to acknowledge any connection to US food Wimpy's may claim. McD's and KFC we have no choice but accept, but...

                                                1. re: hill food

                                                  Wimpy first opened in the UK in 1954, pre-dating American outlets by a goodly number of years. It's always had a strong business connection with South Africa and is currently in South African ownership.

                                                  It's original monopoly has long gone and it now trades as our third largest burger chain, mainly concentrated in south east England, although there are outlets in other parts of Great Britain. The quality is no better than that of American companies.

                                                  1. re: Harters

                                                    It's been a few years since I ate at one, but back then, the quality at Wimpy's was far, far worse than the American fast food chains--and I'm saying this as somebody who has a burger from any of the American versions once or twice a year, when I'm desperate enough.

                                                    1. re: MsMaryMc

                                                      .

                                                      1. re: MsMaryMc

                                                        It's been a good 30 years, but I could smell the Wimpy's as soon as I read your post - nasty. My cousins always went for it, and I went for the Spud U Like next door.

                                                      2. re: Harters

                                                        they have them in India, too.

                                              2. re: sunshine842

                                                Imbiss means "snack" not necessarily fast food. A snack stand might be "eine Imbissbude"

                                                1. re: Wawsanham

                                                  but it's food and it's fast, yes?

                                                  We're talking about signs in train stations and on shopping streets, not dictionary precision.

                                              3. re: JuniorBalloon

                                                I wonder if the idea of "chains" sometimes get grossly correlated to McDonald's/KFC. And if a chain isn't at that level, then it gets dismissed.

                                                Israel has both its own burger/sandwich chains as well as a number of cafe chains, waffle bar chains, not to mention Max Brenner. But, when talking in English, you'll hear people say that they don't go to "chains" as they're drinking a coffee from one of these cafe chains. So I wonder if it has something to do with just a concept of the term "chains" as being an American fast food evil - as opposed to accompassing the entire spectrum of a chain.

                                                1. re: cresyd

                                                  I also wonder if Junior's colleague just wants to create an image of a reality that just doesn't exist....that no, we don't have any chain restaurants -- we eat REAL food.

                                                  Guessing he really wasn't thinking that Junior would ask the opinion of people who've actually been to Germany and can call bullshit.

                                                  No idea of why he'd make the assertion, nor am I judging, by the way.

                                                2. re: JuniorBalloon

                                                  Considering the meaning of Wienerwald (Vienna Woods) it would be logical to think it was an Austrian chain, but according to Wikipedia, it was founded in Munich. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wienerwa... There are many similarities between Bavarian and Austrian foods, and culture in general.

                                                  I went to a very good American-inspired restaurant in the Marais; it was inspired by light, healthful "Californian" type cuisine, not the stereotypes of heavy cheesecakes and borderline junk. Alas I forget its name and don't know whether it still exists, but there are certainly other restaurants in Paris that are inspired by this type of cooking. You might want to try the Secrets of Paris blog for others.

                                                  1. re: lagatta

                                                    I was also thinking of Wienerwald.

                                                    There are also some smaller German chains in different parts of Germany. I've often stopped at various locations of Rischart when I've been visiting Munich.

                                                    The Movenpick reststops located on some Autobahn routes blow the current Canadian incarnation of Movenpick out of the water.

                                                    on the topic of American food in Europe:
                                                    In London, UK, there's a restaurant called Automat that serves up American food, although it's not American chain food.

                                                    on the topic of American chain food:
                                                    I've seen a Dunkin' Donuts in Berlin.

                                                    I've seen McDonald's locations throughout Germany, and remember reading about a McRaclette available in Switzerland.

                                                    There's was also a Hooters location in Interlaken, Switzerland when I was last there in 2004.

                                                    1. re: prima

                                                      Hooterlaken, eh? Me likes. And I'll take the McRaclette on the bedside table with a bucket of iced chablis.

                                                      1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                        I got a kick out of the locally-owned TexMex-ish nachos joint in St. Anton, which is where I heard more than a few renditions of Sweet Home Alabama during Karaoke Night. I didn't try any of the nachos, ribs or wings. I stick to a strictly Tyrolean diet when I visit the Tyrol.
                                                        http://www.bobos.at/speisekarte.pdf

                                                        1. re: prima

                                                          A load o' likker'd up Swiss bawling out Sweet Home Alabama--what a riot! Heh heh. That almost restores my faith in humanity.

                                                          1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                            Actually, anyone with some liquor on-board, singing "Sweet Home Alabama," is not a pretty sight in my imagination.

                                                            Hunt

                                                            1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                              I take it you're from Mississippi. ;)

                                                              1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                this is OT, but I'd like to hear a bunch of drunk Germanic types belting out Kid Rock's cover version. I might even join in.

                                                                1. re: hill food

                                                                  On my first trip to Oktoberfest, I was dumbstruck when the entire tent climbed onto their tables to sing "Take Me Home, Country Roads"-- every word, in English. Surreal, but still makes me giggle.

                                                                  1. re: sunshine842

                                                                    given the usual pronunciation over-compensation did it come out as "Fest Wirshinia"?

                                                                    woulda loved to have been there as well.

                                                                    1. re: hill food

                                                                      No, the English was impressively clear (particularly given the quantities of beer that had been consumed)

                                                                      1. re: sunshine842

                                                                        THAT is simply amazing!

                                                                        Hunt

                                                                2. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                  Yes - the MS Gulf Coast, as a matter of fact.

                                                                  That is why I claim that "English is my second language... "

                                                                  Hunt

                                                          2. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                            :-)

                                                          3. re: prima

                                                            there was a Dunkin' Donuts in Cologne about 2 years ago -- and McRaclette is a current offering throughout France, too -- they have four cheeseburgers -- Camembert, Gruyere, Chevre, and Raclette -- and they're actually kinda da bomb, especially the Camembert. I wouldn't ever have thought of it, but it's really good.

                                                        2. re: JuniorBalloon

                                                          My abject apologies for misreadiing your original post.

                                                      2. re: JuniorBalloon

                                                        Maybe he was just yanking your lederhosen. ;)

                                                        1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                          I was going to say maybe he was just yanking your chain!

                                                      3. Just back from Paris and Amsterdam and there were many "American" restaurants and they were all packed. Go figure?
                                                        American diners, Burger joints, steak houses, pizzerias and that's not counting the chains that are everywhere.
                                                        I guess Europeans love American culture, no surprise there!

                                                        7 Replies
                                                        1. re: Motosport

                                                          I have also encountered some culinary anomalies, and a few, regarding what I would consider "American Cuisine."

                                                          We stay in the Hilton Park Lane, which is but a few blocks from the Hard Rock Cafe. We pass by on our walks to St. James Park, and there are lines, at almost all hours. However, judging from the languages spoken in the line, I would say that most patrons are from Eastern Europe, and not from Western Europe, or the UK. Still, very, very popular, with lines out onto Piccadilly.

                                                          Hunt

                                                          1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                            That is interesting. London, Paris and New York are all tourist destinations.
                                                            There are so many Eastern Europeans in NYC these days.

                                                            1. re: Motosport

                                                              We have encountered the same - San Francisco is filled with Eastern Europeans, and Asians. London, more Eastern Europeans (but then there are some very good E. Euro restaurants, like Caviar House), Rome is heavily Asian, as is Paris. Now, I have to say that I have not sought out Asian restaurants, in either Rome, or Paris, but there are probably many.

                                                              While there might well be US chains, or US restaurants in Rome, and Paris, we did not really see them, and were not seeking them out. I might well have walked past a half-dozen KFC's, on my way to Michel Rostang's, but just did not notice.

                                                              Had a friend not pointed out the Texas Embassy in London, I doubt that I would have taken notice of it either.

                                                              Maybe we are rare, but just do not seek out US food, when abroad. Heck, unless I am hosting my UK Board, and I am at a restaurant, that has Larry Turley's 101 Zinfandel, I will seldom even consider US wines. It just never crosses my feeble mind. When in another country, I want to sample their cuisine, and not what awaits me, back home.

                                                              It's like when we head to San Francisco (about 30x per year), we do not look for Phoenician, or New Orleans cuisine. Same for NYC, Chicago, Honolulu, or any UK/Euro destination. Not sure what the draw, for some, really is, but I do not share it.

                                                              Hunt

                                                              1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                once in Paris I did search out VN food in a comparison to what's found in the US (hey they were in the Indochine long before we got involved) maybe it was the wrong place or night and it was...OK. same for Chinese once in Rome. however the sushi was good at some place off the Piazza d'Espagna near Sermonetta gloves (best gloves ever).

                                                                my guess is the owners are shy to cook what they truly know. but then how many years did cooks from SE Asia in the US needed to shovel chow mein and foo yung before realizing there is an appreciative audience for the other possibilities that weren't Americanized glop? I seem to recall it wasn't until the late 70's before we started seeing distinctions like Hunan, Canton, Szechwan (sp) and later VN, Thai, etc.

                                                                it may be a similar phenom, once the idea that American food is not a uniform juggernaut it will grow.

                                                                1. re: hill food

                                                                  Now, when it comes to Paris, we have not really explored much, beyond French cuisine. However, in London, we do venture out - French, German, Italian, Indian, as well as British, plus a few more, just for enjoyment.

                                                                  Beyond some variations on Indian, I do not recall anything that I would typify as Asian (some cross-over, depending on the boundaries of the various countries).

                                                                  Hunt

                                                                2. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                  I Paris we ate mostly French food with one North African place thrown in before going to a Jazz club. It was all good.
                                                                  Never did we even think of hitting Lou Lou's Friendly Diner or Tennessee Burger. We were not that homesick.
                                                                  We did go on a "perfect" croissant tour every morning.
                                                                  In Amsterdam we ate a mix of local and ethnic cuisines. Ristoffel was one of our favorites. Believe it or not, there is only one ristoffel restaurant in Manhattan. Go figure?

                                                                  1. re: Motosport

                                                                    that's the same # of Riijstaffel or even fewer than on tiny little Aruba. but then I guess the Dutch gave up Manhattan far longer ago.

                                                          2. If you're referring to chain fast food, then as everyone else has mentioned, they're all over the place. In Germany specifically, I've seen Starbucks, McDonalds, etc. but not in border viillages. In the Mitte section of Berlin I know there are themed American places, at least there were a couple of years ago but they were indie German, not chains.

                                                            Oddly enough, Hard Rock still exists in Europe whereas it's nine-tenths dead here in the US.

                                                            I've never seen an Olive Garden anywhere outside the US except in freakin' India of all places. India is weird because the major cities also have stores like Bed, Bath and Beyond which I've never seen in Europe, lol.

                                                            As for European chains or indie resaurants that serve American food or bill themselves specifically as American, the only one I can think of because I've actually visited, is in London called Maxwell's, although a lot of pubs, gastros and high market restaurants actually have burgers on their menus, go figure.

                                                            2 Replies
                                                            1. re: mushroomaffairs

                                                              Not referring to American chains. They are everywhere. His comment was that there weren't any German chains serving German food. While not 100% correct he is basically right as ther are very few.

                                                              jb

                                                              1. re: mushroomaffairs

                                                                I studied at a little college just outside of London for my junior year, in 1978-79. It was a fabulous experience...but not without its difficulties. Even though I was having an amazing time, it was my first time far away from home, and I was really homesick. And the food...our college cafeteria was abysmal (except their currant scones--got to give them props for that, they were outstanding). It was run by sweet little old gray-haired ladies who made bland, gray food and served it with a smile. I largely lived on cheese and Ryvita crackers and McVitie's Digestive Biscuits for most of the school year.

                                                                The cafeteria ladies knew they had some Americans at the college, so on Thanksgiving, they did their best to make us feel closer to home. Even though it was just another Thursday for them, dinner that day was turkey, dressing, mashed potatoes, and gravy. And they had outdone themselves...this was a truly, memorably horrible meal in a series of really bad ones. I remember that the dressing tasted like it was made with insecticide.

                                                                My friends and I thanked them profusely, choked down a few bites, and ran for the train station. We took the train into London and headed for the one place where we thought we might get an American meal: the Hard Rock Cafe.

                                                                This was when there was only one Hard Rock Cafe, the first one, in London. It was founded in the early seventies by a couple of homesick American guys who were craving a good hamburger. They were reputed to have the best burgers in London (which, from my experience, wasn't saying much back then). It was totally different from the silly, glitzy places they are now. It was very clean and simple inside, in the style of an old-fashioned diner--checkered linoleum floor, Formica tables, red leatherette booths, real jars of French's yellow mustard and little packets of real Saltines on the tables. We hadn't seen that stuff for months. There were a few photos and American souvenirs on the walls, but it was mostly not that different from a real 1950's-style American diner--idealized and a little too shinny, but a lot like home.

                                                                We had our burgers (just as good as we'd been promised), and salads with Thousand Island dressing (NOT Salad Cream!), and cocktails from the bar (you didn't dare order those at the college pub--we'd been drinking nothing but beer for months), and some pretty good pie for dessert. It really did feel like home--a little island of America. It wasn't a very traditional Thanksgiving dinner, but I think it might be the best one I ever had.

                                                              2. The Texas Embassy in London might fit the bill. http://www.texasembassy.com/

                                                                However, I see some comments that they might have closed?

                                                                Hunt

                                                                1. Now, being a US citizen, who travels to Europe/UK many times per year, and thinking about US cuisine is just not on MY radar. Whether London, Paris or Rome, that is way, way down my list. Just like US wines (though I enjoy many), I do not seek such out. I try to immerse myself in the culture (culinary and otherwise), where I am, at that moment.

                                                                  Wish that I could be of more help, but it's something that I never think about.

                                                                  Hunt

                                                                  13 Replies
                                                                  1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                    I'm with you and never would think to seek out American food while travelling abroad. Just thought it was curious.

                                                                    jb

                                                                    1. re: JuniorBalloon

                                                                      I don't seek out American food, either, but it's pretty hard to walk down a street and NOT see the lineup of fast-food chains.

                                                                      1. re: sunshine842

                                                                        Those must just pass from my vision.

                                                                        We were at an intersection in Paris, and while waiting to cross, saw a KFC. We both laughed. However, we did similar in Honolulu many years ago, when we saw a KFC. I mean, we're in Hawai`i, with some great chefs, and there is a KFC!?!

                                                                        OTOH, we do not dine at a Morton's Steakhouse, when traveling, as we too often have to dine at them at home, as guests. I do not want the "same old, same old," regardless of where I am.

                                                                        Hunt

                                                                        1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                          next time you're in SF see if the Japantown Denny's still serves a Hawai'ian breakfast (did I get that glottal stop right?) my only problem was they'd only serve 'plate' so I couldn't get hash browns, fried Spam and pineapple alacarte.

                                                                          1. re: hill food

                                                                            Interesting. We are in SF 12 - 18x per year, and I will make the walk for SOMA, or Union Square, and give it a go.

                                                                            Thank you,

                                                                            Hunt

                                                                            1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                              oh that's not an easy walk - from downtown it's a cheap cab ride or a quick bump on the 38 Geary bus. it's just across Post from the Nihonmachi. (which has a cool grocery store in the basement BTW)

                                                                              1. re: hill food

                                                                                I walk that, while wife is in meetings, but for dinner, it IS a cab, or bus.

                                                                                On a good day, I often do a "Bay to Breakers" walk, but for dinner, well, not so often.

                                                                                Thank you,

                                                                                Hunt

                                                                                1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                                  I used to do that, when I was 25 or so and I was broke and it was late at night. gee, an hour plus wait for a bus (that MAY show up) or a long walk...hmmm made for interesting stories.

                                                                                  1. re: hill food

                                                                                    Ah, the buses, or streetcars in SF. We seem to almost always be at odds with those, plus cabs too. The stories abound, and we often just walk. A nice hike, in the fog, is not a bad thing. Luckily, I know most of the routes, that do not involve those lovely SF hills, so my wife can walk on relatively flat land. She looks over two blocks, and asks, "How did we avoid THAT?" Well, it pays to know the "lay of the land."

                                                                                    Now, between where we normally stay, and Japan Town, the walk is much better during the day, than at night. I'll easily walk from SOMA to Jardiniere, in the day, but cab it, at night. Maybe that is just me?

                                                                                    Thank you for the rec.

                                                                                    Hunt

                                                                                    1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                                      I wouldn't go out of my way, it is, after all, in the end, still a Denny's. and one in SF at that. don't waste your time.

                                                                                      1. re: hill food

                                                                                        Now, I am not usually a Denny's fan, BUT I still have great memories of one, in Guadalajara, Mexico, that had some outstanding dishes, and none, that appeared on any US Denny's menus. I mean, who knew?

                                                                                        Same for a Sizzler in Waikiki, that had the best Macadamia Pancakes, and Fresh Papaya, that I have ever tasted - Ritz-Carlton, Four-Seasons, et al. They were just great, and so very unexpected - I mean, SIZZLER?

                                                                                        They are gone, and for a few decades, and it's now a "Cheeseburger in Paradise," or similar, and their breakfasts are... well just horrible. Over the years, we have opted for Orchids (Halekulani) for breakfast.

                                                                                        We try to be open to suggestions from trusted CH posters.

                                                                                        Hunt

                                                                                        1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                                          that's why I don't want to steer you wrong, if you're over that way for some off-standard weird 'Hello Kitty' products, gorgeous art books, really cool wood-working tools or a movie at the Kabuki...you'll be better off slurping udon in the Nihonmachi.

                                                                                          1. re: hill food

                                                                                            LOL - got it!

                                                                                            Thank you,

                                                                                            Hunt

                                                                  2. I think there's an interest in US food and the various cultural mash-ups. in the 90's Tex-Mex had a popularity in Paris, Ramsay did a 'Kitchen Nightmares' episode on a soul food place in the UK.

                                                                    my hunch is the impression formed by the fast-food 'junk' reputation has caused a reluctance to embrace and explore the culinary 'Tilt-a-Whirl' that best represents what the US has to offer.

                                                                    15 Replies
                                                                    1. re: hill food

                                                                      You could be correct.

                                                                      I would only hope that in Europe/UK, they would be exposed to great examples of US cuisine. There is MUCH to share.

                                                                      However, looking at wine lists (at many levels) in Europe/UK, 99% of the US wines, that are offered, are pure dreck, and at greatly elevated prices. I do understand when my Euro/UK friends tell me that "US wine is expensive plonk." Based on what I have observed, they are 100% correct. The "good stuff" does not make it, and the "plonk," that does, is marked up 1000%.

                                                                      I have never ordered one bottle of US wine, in any of about 40 hosted dinners - almost all are FR, with some GR and IT wines.

                                                                      Now, we get them in the US in the Spring, so things WILL change, and they will get to enjoy some great US wines.

                                                                      I will also feature US dishes for the dinners, but no McD's, BK, or KFC. If inclined, they can seek those, on their own.

                                                                      As we are in Phoenix, AZ, I am going much more local, and the wines will reflect the location (though I love FR wines, none will be served - only great US examples, that they never get to see).

                                                                      Some folk comment that they just cannot stand a few days of "local cuisine," and must have a McD's. Well, in the US, it has probably been 35 years, since my last, and that was enough to hold me, until 2050.

                                                                      Hunt

                                                                      1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                        why would one order US wine in Europe when what passes for 'plonk' in most countries and sold in a "bring your jug and fill from our barrel by the liter" manner, is better than what passes for most table wine here? the US should be proud of lots of recent developments, but cheap house/table wine is not as easily obtained.

                                                                        1. re: hill food

                                                                          Yeah. We totally enjoy the abundance of local, affordable grapes available to us in Germany.

                                                                          The selection of German wines around here is pretty sad, overpriced at that.

                                                                          1. re: linguafood

                                                                            you're being sarcastic right? I was mostly thinking of neighborhood stores in France, Italy and Spain. I wasn't into wine in my Germany days. and I gotta admit Gewurztraminer Riesling and the like, do not float my boat. more for the rest.

                                                                            1. re: hill food

                                                                              No sarcasm at all. I didn't get into white wine until we spent a sabbatical in Berlin -- and then went nuts on Italian, French, Spanish and, of course, German whites with Riesling being my favorite to this day... like Weissburgunder and Grauburgunder (the German versions of pinot blanco/bianco and pinot grigio/gris, respectively).

                                                                              Dirt cheap, as opposed to the crappy German wines available to us stateside.

                                                                              1. re: linguafood

                                                                                ah I see, here=US, yes we get the dregs of those varietals and not the subtle ones.

                                                                                1. re: hill food

                                                                                  Sorry for the confusion -- my "here" is seasonally determined '-)

                                                                                  1. re: linguafood

                                                                                    and that's a state of confusion I would aspire to someday occupy.

                                                                                2. re: linguafood

                                                                                  Linguafood,

                                                                                  Unfortunately, and for various reasons, there are only a few great GR wines in the US, but there do seem to be more in the UK. I have not delved deeply into them in FR, as we normally pair FR whites (and reds), with the FR cuisine.

                                                                                  In the US, I'd guess that 80% of the GR whites are very low-level, and NOT representative of what is available. Such is life. OTOH, we know many great GR white producers, and seek them out, when the dish is right for them.

                                                                                  Riesling is one of the "Noble Grapes," and when done correctly, is a joy. Unfortunately, there are too many "others," and that is what too many encounter.

                                                                                  Hunt

                                                                                  1. re: Bill Hunt

                                                                                    My understanding is that Germany is a net importer of wine: they drink most of their domestic production themselves.

                                                                                    1. re: Ruth Lafler

                                                                                      Yes, I've had excellent rieslings from the Rheingau, but even there, they aren't cheap. Germany must be a net importer of wine, because most of the red wine I've drunk there was French or Italian.

                                                                                      1. re: lagatta

                                                                                        Germany is a huge exporter of white wines -- but the climate simply doesn't support growth of red varietals, so there's very little in the way of German reds.

                                                                                        1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                          Yes, and the ones I've had have been underwhelming, unlike these stellar whites I've had the pleasure of tasting.

                                                                                          1. re: lagatta

                                                                                            Germany doesn't even pretend to produce great reds.

                                                                            2. re: hill food

                                                                              I feel the same way. Though about 40% of my cellar is US wine, in Europe/UK, the examples are just not worthy, and very highly priced. There, I normally go with FR, or IT wines, with some GR ones, depending on the dishes.

                                                                              Luckily, we are hosting our UK Board in the US, and I hope to expose them to some great US wines, which they will likely never see, back in the UK.

                                                                              OTOH, I can sneak some great examples of great US wine into my luggage (please do not tell the UK Customs), and do some of that exposure, all in the name of really good wines, that are just not available to some excellent people.

                                                                              Hunt

                                                                        2. We stumbled across a Danish chain called Jenses Bofhaus last year (it was cold and wet, lunchtime, and they were there) which reminded me a lot of the old Sizzler steak houses. They even had a salad bar - something I've never seen in Europe before - with real, fresh veggies!

                                                                          I think one reason is that the US is the size of Europe, with a vary diverse cuisine. My restaurant fantasy is to open an American restaurant in Paris, serving a rotating selection of regional cooking, with a chili of the week.

                                                                          1 Reply
                                                                          1. re: tardigrade

                                                                            That size vs diversity is a good point, at least for me.

                                                                            Hunt

                                                                          2. At least in Hamburg, very much in Germany, there is a sit-down chain restaurant (not fast food at all) called "Block House"--it is absolutely "American" in style as it is a US-style steak house. Perhaps, it has become such a part of the local landscape that people forget that it is American food (steaks, baked potatoes, etc...).

                                                                            1 Reply
                                                                            1. re: Wawsanham

                                                                              Their meat is not from Argentina, like Maredo's (another steakhouse chain mentioned upthread)?

                                                                            2. I've seen tons of the large chain restaurants all over Europe, and I ate many times at this tex-mex non-chain in Prague. Aside from tacos and nachos, etc... they also served very good buffalo wings. The food was quite tasty, and my friends and I always enjoyed a meal there.
                                                                              http://travel.nytimes.com/travel/guid...

                                                                              7 Replies
                                                                              1. re: alliegator

                                                                                I trust no Tex-Mex north of the Red River let alone east of the Rhine. ;)

                                                                                1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                                  While I would normally agree with you, I was very, very surprised by the food at this place. Too bad it's closed, I did a little more googling on it.
                                                                                  Is it as good as here? No. But when it's a Friday night and you want a dinner that makes you smile, that was the place. You just had to be sure to drink plenty of beer so the bill didn't bother you so much O_o
                                                                                  I find the nastiest tex-mex to be in SE Asia. Truly an abomination.

                                                                                  1. re: alliegator

                                                                                    Laotian fajitas--Christ, I can only imagine.

                                                                                    1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                                      And I'll also add, I will stop defending European tex-mex when we get so far east that we come to "Texac" in Yaroslavl, Russia. Pretty bad stuff. If you ever make it there, there's a picture of me holding up my driver's license on the wall of silliness, haha!
                                                                                      http://texas76.ru/

                                                                                      1. re: alliegator

                                                                                        I would love to visit Yaroslavl, but for the medieval eccliastical architecture and the history, not, alas, for the Tex-Mex. I suspect a spell with Ivan Groznyii would be more pleasant.

                                                                                        1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                                          Now, that's funny :D I highly recommend Yaroslavl, though. I love typical Russian food, so the Texac memory has mostly been blotted out.

                                                                                  2. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                                    LOL.

                                                                                    Tex-Mex, more than about 75 miles from the border, would be suspect to me, as well.

                                                                                    Hunt

                                                                                2. I dunno, OP clearly indicated he is not interested in chains, but this thread seems to be dwelling on locations of chain restos in Germany.

                                                                                  Here is a list of non-chains in Germany, per OP's request:
                                                                                  (53 American-style restaurants, and that's JUST Berlin!!)

                                                                                  http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant...

                                                                                  1 Reply
                                                                                  1. re: lemarais

                                                                                    I must have worded my OP poorly. I'm not actually interested in finding these American restaurants in Europe. My co-worker said they didn't exist. I thought of Chowhound before Google. Seems there are lots of them.

                                                                                    His second comment was that Germans do not have their own chain type restaurants like we do. Seems that comment is a bit more correct, though not entirely, than teh no American restaurants.

                                                                                    I do think the motiviation behind his comments was a light, friendly jab at American food culture as compared to German food culture.

                                                                                    I think there is some truth to it as well. Not that you won't find any junk food in Germany nor that you won't find any good food in America, but in general we are the kings of fast food and Europe in general wins the greater appreciation of slow food.

                                                                                    jb

                                                                                  2. My aunt's niece has a lovely restaurant in Paris that serves bagels, hot dogs and "deli" type foods. Peanut butter, too! It's really quite cute and the menu has something for everyone.
                                                                                    It's called Adele's Family.

                                                                                    http://www.adelesfamily.com
                                                                                    http://www.facebook.com/adelesfamily?...

                                                                                    5 Replies
                                                                                    1. re: MRS

                                                                                      You have just jogged my memory of a restaurant that I saw in Lyon, France 2 years ago that featured Bagels and "New York Street Food." I cannot imagine yearning for NY street food in Lyon, but I suppose if you lived there you might.

                                                                                      Here is the picture that I snapped:

                                                                                       
                                                                                      1. re: masha

                                                                                        the locals see it as something different and exotic, and yes -- as an expat, even when you cook and eat local 90% or more of the time -- sometimes you really, really NEED a bagel.

                                                                                        Sad part is that the odd cravings are usually a disappointment.

                                                                                        The only Mexican food I've had in France that was worth a toss (other than my own - my spices!) was a place called Candelaria -- the owner is from Oaxaca, and turns out some awesome food.

                                                                                        1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                          Thanks, I'll note that, as I have two friends from Toronto living in Paris (with their young daughter, but I only met her a a baby)... He is from Toronto, of south Indian descent, and she is Mexican. He can find quite decent South Asian food (served mostly to South Asian immigrants) but I didn't think there was a single decent Mexican resto in Paris.

                                                                                          1. re: lagatta

                                                                                            I was talking to one of the employees at Epicerie Bruno (rue Tiquetonne - a great source for chilis and masa) -- he said there's a quiet revolution in Mexican food going on. There are finally enough immigrants and folks who've had "the real thing" that there's enough demand to support restaurants and the logistics of the ingredients.

                                                                                          2. re: sunshine842

                                                                                            I understand the "expat" nostalgia for food from home -- somewhat like us folks from the Eastern US who are perpetually on the lookout for decent NY or New Haven style pizza here in the home of deep-dish (Chicago).

                                                                                      2. In the UK part of Europe, there are a small number of BBQ type places. In my experience, they are modelled more on American BBQ chain restaurants than small pit BBQ restaurants. Of course, we also have have McDonalds, Burger King and KFC.

                                                                                        By way of a reciprocal question, are there many British restaurants in America, serving the sort of food that our restaurants here serve (say, roast partridge, grilled plaice with leeks, lamb with faggots)?

                                                                                        Apart from themed restaurants (like, the BBQ places here), would the OP not agree that restaurant availability tends to follow immigration patterns. So, hardly surprising that there are a lot of Turkish restaurants in Germany or a lot of south asian restaurants in the UK, In that respect, our latest census indicates that there are less than 200,000 American-born people living in Britain - several thousand less than there are Bangladeshis or South Africans. Now 200k is equivalent to a reasonably sized town but, unlike the Bangladeshis and South Africans who tend to have enigrated here for permanent settlement, the Americans tend to be living in the Greater London area and are here on temporary work assigments. As such, it is hardly surprising that there has been no development of American diner food - it is diffuicult to think what the market for it would be.

                                                                                        10 Replies
                                                                                        1. re: Harters

                                                                                          From my observation, Brit restaurants are not heavy on the ground here. You'll see a few soi dissant pubs, but they're as apt to serve Yank bar food as true Limey grub.

                                                                                          1. re: Perilagu Khan

                                                                                            Thought that might be the case, PK. I've spotted the pubs on trips to the western side of the pond - but, almost needless to say, have never been in one.

                                                                                            1. re: Harters

                                                                                              In the Twin Cities, there are two pubs, one British and at least one Irish, that have a menu with foods representing those countries. The British pub has lawn bowling on the roof and both go mad during thr World Cup.

                                                                                              In Arizona there are a couple of pubs named The Cornish Pasty Company that serve good, obviously, pasties although I'm sure they have some varities which are not found in Cornwall.

                                                                                              In Minnesota, meatballs are widely available, but are likely quite different from those to which you referred.

                                                                                          2. re: Harters

                                                                                            I would absolutely agree. I didn't find it hard to believe there were no American restaurants (of course, turns out that's a crock) only curious.

                                                                                            jb

                                                                                            1. re: Harters

                                                                                              I do know of one place on the East End of Long Island that serves Bangers and Mash. In Manhattan,????

                                                                                              1. re: Motosport

                                                                                                Tea & Sympathy on Greenwich Ave. serves bangers & mash.

                                                                                                http://teaandsympathynewyork.com/rest...

                                                                                              2. re: Harters

                                                                                                Harters, here's the menu of a place near me (Detroit area), I have yet to eat there (ironically, it replaced a BBQ restaurant)
                                                                                                http://www.redfoxenglishpub.com/docum...

                                                                                                We do have a surfeit of Irish places, of course a fair amount of similarity in the menu. Everyone gets shepherds pie, bangers and mash, fish and chips.

                                                                                                1. re: coney with everything

                                                                                                  Thanks for that. Looks like they slip in the occasional well known British dish in amongst more common American items. Pretty similar to here where a good food pub will have a broad range of local dishes but may add in a more American dish like, say, a Caesar salad.

                                                                                                  By way of a swap, here's the menu of a place local to me:
                                                                                                  http://www.brunningandprice.co.uk/sut...

                                                                                                  1. re: Harters

                                                                                                    wow Harter's, that reads like a menu at the current crop of 'locavore' places in cities of every tier in the US and quite reasonable (yeah know the prices are in £'s)

                                                                                                    JungMann - oddly enough there's one in, of all places, Springfield MO, it even won a "best of" award from a British newspaper.

                                                                                                    http://farmersgastropub.com/menu/menu/

                                                                                                    your point about finding game in a restaurant is sadly, spot on, that category is overlooked. on an epic level. heck, even (farm-raised) bison and venison is seen as weird in most places.

                                                                                                2. re: Harters

                                                                                                  You'll be hard pressed to find the variety of game one finds in the UK, but there are a few places in the major cities which have progressed the gastropub concept to reflect its English roots. Owen & Engine in Chicago comes to mind; Waterloo & City in L.A.; The Breslin in NYC. Outside the culinary hubs of the country, English food is either non-existent or relegated to fish and chips.

                                                                                                3. There is The Spirit of New Orleans at Hessenstraße 17 Hofheim, DE (near Frankfurt)

                                                                                                  http://www.johns-catering-cooking.de/...

                                                                                                  1. Funny story: While in Tokyo on a business trip many years ago a group of us went out to lunch. My buddy Roger and I decided to go to a small hole in the wall working man's restaurant.
                                                                                                    The rest of the group was not quite up to the culiary challenge and went to a huge McDonalds which had an enormous billboard.
                                                                                                    We met them after lunch and shared the story of our fabulous Japanese food.
                                                                                                    They all said: "We had Big Mac's! At least we know what we are eating!"
                                                                                                    I pointed to the huge billboard that had a picture of the Big Mac and said "100% meat!" then I explained that it did not say "beef" and could have been any kind of "meat." You should have seen their faces.

                                                                                                    1. The American Club in Tokyo does a pretty decent Thanksgiving turkey with gravy and fixings.

                                                                                                      1. On the autoroutes from Strassbourg to Paris, they had American-style steakhouses. We stopped and the cuts of the steaks were strange, but we thought it was interesting.

                                                                                                        2 Replies
                                                                                                        1. re: shoo bee doo

                                                                                                          Yes, it's called Courtepaille, they are all built in the strange dome-like shape, and the steaks are char-broiled, something one rarely sees in France. It's a novelty, and a big hit with a lot of French people.

                                                                                                          1. re: shoo bee doo

                                                                                                            the cuts are strange because the butchering is done very differently here - it takes a long time to get used to.

                                                                                                            They're at least pretty consistently decent -- never gourmet, but not too bad.

                                                                                                          2. When I lived in England in college, 1988, I was quite poor and ate at home mostly, with my roommates who were all vegan. I wasn't and supplemented our diet with fried fish from the chip shop. If there was American food, I was mostly unaware of it. Once I was taken by friends to a pizza restaurant where they insisted on ordering the "American" style pizza, which came with corn kernels on top. This, I surely do not have to tell anyone, is not american style. It tasted okay, but was quite exotic to me. I'm sure things are different now.

                                                                                                            15 Replies
                                                                                                            1. re: Teague

                                                                                                              Our main pizza chain - Pizza Express - sells an "American". Other than tomato sauce and mozzarella, the only topping is pepperoni.

                                                                                                              There's also the "American Hot", same as the "American" but with jalapeno. The Hot is my personal favourite of their offerings, whilst Mrs Harters prefers the American.

                                                                                                              1. re: Teague

                                                                                                                I was in England in 1988 as well, just out of college and I worked in London at the Hard Rock Cafe shop, speaking of American restaurants. We had one free meal per shift and that was pretty much what i lived on. We had to pick up our meal in the kitchen and the hygiene in there was nearly unspeakable. However, burger-craving Americans lined up in DROVES to eat there.

                                                                                                                1. re: Teague

                                                                                                                  Corn on pizza isn't American style, it is Japanese style!

                                                                                                                  1. re: Tripeler

                                                                                                                    Quite popular in Der Fatherland as well.

                                                                                                                    1. re: linguafood

                                                                                                                      Also quite common in the UK, where that pizza will usually also include chicken. Neither belong anywhere near pizza, IMO.

                                                                                                                      1. re: Harters

                                                                                                                        I love corn on pizza. I like it with tuna & onions or with mushrooms (fresh, of course) and ham.

                                                                                                                        Fuck pineapple, tho. Not on my pizza, not ever.

                                                                                                                        1. re: linguafood

                                                                                                                          I'm a complete snob about pizza. I work to the basis that if you'd regularly see a topping in Italy, then it's OK. If not, then it's not.

                                                                                                                          So, I agree, fuck pineapple.

                                                                                                                          1. re: Harters

                                                                                                                            Painful as I would imagine it to be :-D

                                                                                                                            1. re: Harters

                                                                                                                              So I don't suppose you'd like my Hawaiian pizzas (ham and pineapple), or my Thai ones (spicy peanut sauce, chicken, fresh bean sprouts and shredded carrots and green onions)? Oh well, more for me!! :-)

                                                                                                                              1. re: MsMaryMc

                                                                                                                                You're right - I'd absolutely hate 'em.

                                                                                                                          2. re: Harters

                                                                                                                            I agree about the chicken. Chicken has no place on my pizza. Neither does duck or pears, which I've noticed in pizza joints in California and Toronto.

                                                                                                                            But I don't mind the pineapple. I see Hawaiian pizza as a North American bastardization that I'll eat when it's free.

                                                                                                                            I've got different rules for different pizzas. If it's a doughy Saskatchewan-style Hawaiian pizza, pineapple is fine by me.

                                                                                                                            If it's a Neapolitan-style pizza, I like my toppings Italian-style.

                                                                                                                            1. re: prima

                                                                                                                              if there's going to be pineapple, then there has to be jalapeno as well. rule #263

                                                                                                                              1. re: hill food

                                                                                                                                Love jalapeño & pineapple. I also like pear and gorganzola on my pizza.

                                                                                                                                1. re: Kalivs

                                                                                                                                  in a dessert pie as a slight shift to the US classic of apple and cheddar I do like pear and cambezola (or just camembert or gorgonzola)

                                                                                                                        2. re: Tripeler

                                                                                                                          Corn on pizza seems to be popular just about everywhere outside of the US and Italy. Right now in Chile, Telepizza (an awful cardboard pizza chain from Spain) is offering various special pizzas with corn and other ingredients in celebration of the Soccer World Cup and Brazil with names like "Copacabana" and "Carioca" for the pizzas--the ad's on TV a lot.

                                                                                                                      2. My first experience with TexMex food was in London during the early 80s. Dominoes Pizza and Pizza Hut were in Edinburgh when I lived there in the early 90s and they had both corn and tuna as optional toppings. I know of at least two American themed restaurants in Switzerland, one is a 50s style dinner attached to a roller skating rink and the other is a really weird Colorado themed steakhouse.

                                                                                                                        1. When we were in Italy last September, we visited the Bastianich vineyards in Friuli (well, actually, we stopped into their shop -- pretty much a waste of time, considering (1) Bastianich wines are available in the US and (2) there are so many small wine growers making great wine in the region that were so much more interesting and gracious, but that's another story). There's a restaurant on their property called Orsone that serves American pub fare -- burgers and beer, and I think there's lobster on their menu, too. Probably more than that, but we had no interest in checking it out; we didn't travel all the way from PA to have American food.

                                                                                                                          1 Reply
                                                                                                                          1. re: CindyJ

                                                                                                                            In Florence, Italy, there's also an American Diner: http://www.theflorencediner.com/wp/?l... and an American bakery making muffins, bagels and brownies: http://www.mamasbakery.it/. Besides the Hard Rock as well.

                                                                                                                          2. When I was last in Prague, I was crestfallen when I saw that a former favorite place of mine, an elegant seafood restaurant, had been turned into a TGIFriday's :(

                                                                                                                            4 Replies
                                                                                                                            1. re: alliegator

                                                                                                                              Oy. The Europeans wild for American culture and food struck again, it would seem :-D

                                                                                                                              1. re: linguafood

                                                                                                                                I would have felt less pissy if it were not for the fact that another Friday's can be found about a 10 minute walk away from they new one. Ugh.

                                                                                                                                1. re: alliegator

                                                                                                                                  oooh maybe US schlock is found to be 'exotic'!

                                                                                                                                  I almost feel a bit dirty!

                                                                                                                                  1. re: hill food

                                                                                                                                    I think you have something there. Back in the 1970's, I remember seeing Bisquick and Kellog's Sugar Frosted Flakes in the Food Hall at Harrods in London, with all the other exotic imported goodies.

                                                                                                                            2. Europeans, most of the world for that matter, are wild for American culture and food.

                                                                                                                              1. The Pearson Room in Canary Wharf is a great American restaurant in London.

                                                                                                                                3 Replies
                                                                                                                                1. re: georgebrown121

                                                                                                                                  Would have thought The Pearson Room should serve Canadian food, given its name and location on Canada Square.
                                                                                                                                  Happy Canada Day weekend, y'all.

                                                                                                                                  1. re: prima

                                                                                                                                    Unfortunately not, prima. Menu reads as a mix between Modern British dishes and more obvious American offerings. Been around for years apparently - here's a recent not very flattering review from the London Evening Standard - http://www.standard.co.uk/goingout/re...

                                                                                                                                    1. re: Harters

                                                                                                                                      A fine example of snarky writing. No shortage of other places to eat in London.