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Using microplane grater for garlic and ginger

(If everyone already knows about this, don't beat me up, okay?!?)

I was making mapo tofu last night and the instructions were to grate the ginger and garlic with the microplane grater. This was a revelation to me. To the point that I'm probably getting rid of my garlic press. They were about the consistency of a puree so combined with the other ingredients beautifully. No little zings of either flavor. At my age, it's the little things that mean a lot :)

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  1. Oh I couldn't agree more! Ditto on small onions, scallion bulbs, shallots, nutmeg, nuts, cheese & chocolate in small amounts especially!

    How about a bit more intel on the mapo tofu. I'm not familiar.

    1 Reply
    1. When we moved in November, the garlic press went in the donate/sell box. Haven't looked back.

      3 Replies
        1. re: c oliver

          the garlic press is good for the little ones to play with playdough.

          1. re: trolley

            big kids too! I use the press to create clay hair for pots I throw and later embellish.

      1. agreed! It's the little things. I felt the same way when I saw the video for peeling a boatload of garlic at once. It changed my life, LOL.

        1 Reply
        1. re: foodieX2

          I have 3 different microplanes and use them all the time for garlic, parm, nutmeg. etc.

        2. Yep, I use microplane from time to time for garlic and ginger. It is a nice tool. More often, though, I smash garlic and ginger with a knife blade. I do have a garlic press, but I have not been using it for a long time.

          1. I use the microplane for ginger but prefer the press for garlic (where it's not as easy to avoid grating your fingertips).

            2 Replies
              1. re: Harters

                Yup, I've had to use the Liquid Skin for bleeding knuckles many times when I've microplaned garlic. I'm such a klutz. So, I occasionally microplane garlic (also use it for ginger), but still use the old reliable garlic press, too.