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Fagor pressure cooker operation

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procrastineer Feb 10, 2013 03:43 PM

I bought a Fagor Duo pressure cooker and did tried to make beef ragu.

The instruction manual says to lower the heat once the pressure indicator pops up. When I lowered the heat, the pressure indicator went down to the normal position. Is this how it supposed to cook under pressure for the remainder of the cooking time? Or should the lowered heat maintain the pressure indicator up throughout the cooking period?

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  1. j
    Johnny L RE: procrastineer Feb 10, 2013 03:56 PM

    the pressure indicator needs to stay up, basically you need to find the sweet spot on your stove where it is simmering high enough just to keep the pressure up.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Johnny L
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      The Veggie Queen RE: Johnny L Feb 12, 2013 04:51 PM

      I like how you described the "sweet spot". That makes sense.

      Many people don't realize that they need to form a relationship with their pressure cooker.

    2. Chemicalkinetics RE: procrastineer Feb 10, 2013 04:19 PM

      < When I lowered the heat, the pressure indicator went down to the normal position. Is this how it supposed to cook under pressure for the remainder of the cooking time? >

      No.

      <Or should the lowered heat maintain the pressure indicator up throughout the cooking period?>

      More or less.

      Actually, the Fagor Duo pressure cooker has three pressure ranges/indictors. The first you will notice is the yellow pin/bar raising up. This simply means the internal pressure is greater than the atomsphere pressure, and that the pot is locked. There is the 8 psi and 15 psi pressure release valve:

      "Spring type mechanism with two pressure settings: Low (8psi) and High (15psi)"

      http://www.fagoramerica.com/cookware/...

      For example, the 15 psi pressure release valve will only allow air/steam to be released when the internal pressure is 15 psi greater than the atomsphere. So if you want to cook at 15 psi, then you will heat the pot until the pressure start to release at the 15 psi valve. Afterward, you can turn down the heat to whch it barely releases steam. This means you are barely at +15 psi which is exactly what you have wanted. Now, the yellow pressure indictor will remain up during all this time.

      1. scubadoo97 RE: procrastineer Feb 10, 2013 07:28 PM

        Give it a few minutes at high once the pop up pops up. The pot is not yet at full pressure when the indicator pops up. Once it's up to pressure you can set it to a simmer and remain pressure

        6 Replies
        1. re: scubadoo97
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          unprofessional_chef RE: scubadoo97 Feb 10, 2013 08:29 PM

          Yes, give it one or two more minutes on high after the yellow pressure indicator is up. I use a chopstick or tongs to tap the pressure indicator. It should be very stiff where it won't move. That's when you know you're at full pressure. At this point you can lower the heat.

          Use something other than your fingers to tap the pressure indicator because it hot or steam could come out while it's still building pressure.

          1. re: scubadoo97
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            procrastineer RE: scubadoo97 Feb 10, 2013 10:23 PM

            I found cooking on medium heat, as recommended by the manual, wasn't enough to get the pressure indicator up. My electric stove has 6 heat settings. At first I was cooking on the 3rd heat setting. After half an hour, the pressure indicator didn't pop up. At first I thought the PC was faulty.

            Then I turned the heat setting up to 5th and the pressure indicator finally popped up. I turned the element to low (2nd heat setting) as soon as the pressure indicator popped up. The pressure indicator went down within a minute or so.

            Next time I will try leaving the PC on high heat for few minutes before lowering the heat.

            1. re: procrastineer
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              ellabee RE: procrastineer Feb 11, 2013 09:35 AM

              Leaving it on high for a minute or so once the yellow indicator pops up before lowering is a good idea, and you may also find that it needs to be lowered to '3' rather than '2' to maintain pressure.

              The Fagor manuals are none too impressive, but I believe you misread their instructions -- you use a medium setting to maintain pressure, not to reach it in the first place. For that you have to use the setting on your stove that would bring an uncovered pot to a boil.

              The posts about operating Fagors on hippressurecooking.com and Miss Vickie's site are helpful supplements to the manual.

              1. re: ellabee
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                Leepa RE: ellabee Feb 12, 2013 05:03 PM

                I agree with ellabee. What I do is have a second burner on the stove on medium and just move it over to that burner after I'm sure it's under sufficient pressure.

            2. re: scubadoo97
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              Miss Priss RE: scubadoo97 Feb 12, 2013 05:20 AM

              I keep the cooker over high heat until the yellow indicator is firmly in the up position AND steam is coming forcefully out of the valve. Then I lower the heat. Seems to work well.

              1. re: Miss Priss
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                The Veggie Queen RE: Miss Priss Feb 12, 2013 04:54 PM

                Miss Priss, you know how to do this well.

                You start with high heat and then lower to whatever is the temperature to keep the valve up.

                It takes people time to figure this out on their stove.

            3. s
              sandi114 RE: procrastineer Feb 26, 2013 11:39 AM

              I have more questions rather than answers. The manual or video actually says not only to wait for the pin to go up but also for steam to be released. Today I spoke with tech service at Fagor and was told the manual is wrong and not to wait for steam to be released before lowering my temperature and starting to time my recipe. Not sure if I should believe them and frankly, I really need the sound of the steam as with a 9 month old, I really can't sit staring at my pot.

              I have a glass electric and she told me to lower my stove to 2. This seems right, but at 1 or at low, the pin stays up too (but I can't see any steam). So is 2 the right level in peoples' opinions? I was looking at Miss Vickie's site which indicates to cook at the lowest pressure that will maintain your pressure (tested with 2 cups of water for 5 minutes).

              Lastly, does anyone have experience cooking just one or two chicken breasts or thighs, boneless, without overcooking? I'm not having much luck!

              Thanks!!

              1 Reply
              1. re: sandi114
                Chemicalkinetics RE: sandi114 Feb 26, 2013 12:02 PM

                <The manual or video actually says not only to wait for the pin to go up but also for steam to be released.>

                That is correct.

                <Today I spoke with tech service at Fagor and was told the manual is wrong and not to wait for steam to be released before lowering my temperature and starting to time my recipe.>

                It depends. It can be correct in special cases, but in general, I don't agree with this. The pin raising only means it has a higher pressure than the atmosphere pressure, but it does not mean it is 8 or 15 psi above the atmosphere pressure. Having the steam starting to release means the pressure inside the pot has exceeded the 8 or 15 psi (whichever the setting you are using for the release valve).

                <This seems right, but at 1 or at low, the pin stays up too (but I can't see any steam).>

                That means that it has not hit the desire pressure.

                <So is 2 the right level in peoples' opinions?>

                Do you see steam at "2"? If you barely see steam coming out, then yes, you were at the right level.

                <I was looking at Miss Vickie's site which indicates to cook at the lowest pressure that will maintain your pressure>

                I will say to "cook at the lowest HEAT setting that will maintain your pressure". I don't think "cook at the lowest PRESSURE that will maintain your pressure" is correct.

                <Lastly, does anyone have experience cooking just one or two chicken breasts or thighs, boneless, without overcooking?>

                Not really. Good luck.

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