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Mayo Clinic's 3-Day Emergency Meal Plan

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Mayo Clinic has put together a 3-day, 4 person emergency meal plan using shelf-stable ingredients and requiring no power. (The first recipe requires you to cook and refrigerate ahead of time). Not bad eating, during an emergency, I think.

Shopping list:

http://newsblog.mayoclinic.org/files/...

Recipes:

http://newsblog.mayoclinic.org/files/...

Don't forget the flashlights, batteries, water, manual can opener, paper plates, plastic utensils, plastic wrap, wax paper... You'll also need a couple of mixing bowls, a knife, and a cutting board.

Most of the items on the shopping list can be stored for an extended period of time, while a couple of items like pita bread and tortillas are perishable.

~TDQ

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  1. I was seriously impressed--until I got to those cans of chicken. I don't think I've ever had chicken from a can. Not even on camping trips.

    Really, though. For nothing but cupboard ingredients and no power, that could tide you over very well, couldn't it?

    20 Replies
    1. re: JoanN

      Yeah, not bad, right? I think the idea of the canned chicken is that you'd get pretty bored after three days of eating only canned fish as your primary protein. Maybe you eat the chicken on day three...in case you don't need to hold out that long...

      ~TDQ

      1. re: JoanN

        Totally agree on the canned chicken...ew. But really a pretty creative menu overall.

        1. re: JoanN

          I haven't used canned chicken in more than 25 years, but remember it being "ok", not awful Reading the recipes, the canned chicken is disguised in enough flavorful sauce that you'd probably only get the texture and nutrition. I vote we each seek out a small can and try it in one of the recipes, just to know what we could be in for. Tally the cost against the household's Research & Development (R&D) budget.

          1. re: MidwesternerTT

            You first. ;-)

            1. re: JoanN

              My wife makes chicken salad with one of those tiny, tiny cans of canned chicken. Mashes it up with a hard boiled egg and some mustard and mayo.

              It (the salad) is about the vilest looking and smelling stuff I can think of but she seems to like it. The chicken itself doesn't look that bad.

              1. re: kengk

                De gustibus . . ., eh? I do remember Hormel ham in a can on camping trips. Poke two holes in the can with a church key and throw it on the fire until heated through. I thought it was a real treat when I was about 9 years old.

              2. re: JoanN

                The Mom discovered canned chicken, made into chicken salad, about 25 years ago..It quickly became her luncheon party routine, served on lettuce, with toasts or crackers.

                I make her a chicken salad, using it, every other week
                It tastes a little weird to me. She adores it. [With finely chopped onion, ditto celery, just a little too much mayo and Trader Joes 21 Seasoning Salute.] It's tough to keep Mom happy these days. This works.

                1. re: JoanN

                  CAUTION - shopping list for chicken does not match recipes. I used the shopping list for canned chicken quantities, which I read as two 5 oz to 6 oz cans of chunk light chicken. Planning to make a half recipe of each of the 2 menu items, with both of the kinds of chicken I bought, for side-by-side comparison. Only to get home and read the recipes that call for "2 large cans of chicken" (Reggies Barbecue Chopped Chicken Salad) and " 1 (16 ounce) can chicken" (Charlies Chicken Salad).

                  I may have to do some math to use my 4.5 oz. can (Swanson's Premium Chunch White Chicken) and my 7 oz pouch (Valley Fresh White Chicken Cuts).

                  If this had been an actual emergency, someone in a family of 4 would be going hungry.

                  1. re: MidwesternerTT

                    Very good observation. That's why it's a good idea to test the recipes if you really intend to rely on them!

                    ~TDQ

                    1. re: MidwesternerTT

                      So, how was it? Or are you waiting to buy some more canned chicken so you can proceed with your plan to try both recipes side-by-side?

                      ~TDQ

                      1. re: The Dairy Queen

                        I'll report back - both recipes are on the list for later this week now. It turns out my "High Hat Tuna" casserole from last night will also be tonight's supper and tomorrow's lunch -- lots more servings than I thought. And I don't think I want to experiment with canned chicken for a Valentines' Day meal.

                        1. re: MidwesternerTT

                          Yeah, I dont' think my valentine would appreciate a room temperature canned chicken dish on Thursday either.

                          ~TDQ

                    2. re: JoanN

                      Recipe and canned chicken report - I tried the Day 2 Dinner, Reggies Chopped Barbecue Chicken Salad on Flatbread for lunch today. Summary - OK to good. For comparing two kinds of chicken side-by-side, I prepared the whole recipe of sauce, beans, corn mixture then divided into two bowls. I put drained canned " Tyson Premium Chunk White Chicken in Water" 12.5 oz in one, and a pouch of "Valley Fresh White Chicken Cuts" 7 oz in the other. By the time the food was stirred. both tasted identical. Sampled straight from the can/pouch, the canned Tyson was larger chunks and more firm.

                      Add a strainer and large mixing bowl to your emergency kitchen equipment list, and I'd prefer to have running water when making/eating these. All canned items needed to be drained - the liquid from the chicken is pungent - and the kidney beans rinsed. The flavorful sauce was drippy on the flatbread. Need to leave it flat and use knife/fork, not make a rollup from it, if you want to keep your hands neat.

                      1. re: MidwesternerTT

                        Terrific report back, thank you!

                        ~TDQ

                    3. re: MidwesternerTT

                      I have half a mind to try them...as you say, might as well know what you're in for.

                      ~TDQ

                      1. re: MidwesternerTT

                        I don't think canned chicken is any grosser than canned tuna. It's not as good as fresh chicken, but it's perfectly fine.

                        1. re: MidwesternerTT

                          I habe eaten canned chicken taste better then canned tuna though which cammed in pouch the can just feels creepy.

                        2. re: JoanN

                          I suppose you could have some precooked and shredded chicken in your freezer, since freezer contents keep pretty well for a day or so without power.

                          1. re: juliejulez

                            The problem is you don't really know how long you'll be without power and opening your freezer allows the cold air to escape, speeding up spoilage.

                            ~TDQ

                            1. re: The Dairy Queen

                              True...I was mostly picturing an outage of 3 days, and in that case it'd probably be ok to open the freezer once.

                        3. Good to have, thanks.

                          1. The list (minus the condiments) is very similar to what the Greater Boston Food Bank offers local food pantries.

                            1. Of course, in storm-prone areas, you can keep the perishable items in the freezer, or prepare to make them as needed.

                              1 Reply
                              1. re: sr44

                                True!

                                ~TDQ

                              2. Thanks for this. Although I don't live in a hurricane area nor one prone to earthquakes or other natural disasters except an occasional ice storm this is a very useful post.

                                1. I dunno.

                                  I have enough boxes of cereal, canned soup and chewing gum stocked in my pantry as it is that I think I'd probably be good to go for at least a couple of weeks, minimum.

                                  6 Replies
                                  1. re: ipsedixit

                                    Dry cereal and cold canned soup can get pretty old pretty fast. If you could last on that for a couple of weeks you've got a stronger constitution, and greater tolerance for pain, than I.

                                    1. re: JoanN

                                      You scoff, but there are many days where I actually crave dry cereal and my precious bottle of Diet Coke.

                                      If I've been traveling for several days, and dining out on rich foods like steak, seafood, duck, etc., there's nothing like unwinding at home with my box of Golean Crunch and a can of Diet Coke. Heaven.

                                      1. re: ipsedixit

                                        Ditto! Only mine is Froot Loops :-/

                                    2. re: ipsedixit

                                      I'm with you, I don't think I'd ever get tired of peanut butter and honey sandwiches... I'd just have to make sure I had enough bread.

                                      1. re: juliejulez

                                        Peanut Butter and Honey? Who really needs bread at that point ... just give me a sturdy spoon.

                                        1. re: ipsedixit

                                          I want to "Like" this!

                                    3. I used to work for a firm that did a LOT of Mayo's design work, they ARE always thinking 20 steps ahead. it is truly a quality operation and the A/E firm I was with had the follow-through to back them up.

                                      1. Some nice outside the box ideas! A little heavy on peanut butter for me personally but I'm one of the few who don't care for it. The energy bar recipe looks like a great snack for kids between school and sports practice.

                                        2 Replies
                                        1. re: meatn3

                                          Left to my own devices, it might be peanut butter and crackers for every meal!

                                          ~TDQ

                                          1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                            I purchased some cracker jacks at a highway rest stop vending machine recently and discovered that the nuts were no longer objectionable to me. Might be about time to try peanut butter again. I give my "dislikes" list a try every 3-5 years. I wish I liked it - such a handy protein source to have!

                                            I am able to enjoy peanut butter in an occasional Reeces cup!

                                        2. If anyone has allergies, they'd really better stock / plan ahead for emergencies. Fortunately, no food allergies in our family. But two friends have kids with allergies - dairy in one family and peanuts in the other. They'd need to make more than a few substitutions in this plan, as would anyone with gluten intolerance.

                                          1. I see the links in my OP are dead, so I thought I'd refresh the link here: http://jacksonville.com/community/sho...

                                            Here's the shopping list: http://www.griffinhealth.org/Portals/...

                                            ~TDQ

                                            60 Replies
                                            1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                              thanks for that -- living back in the hurricane latitudes means I have to think about this stuff again.

                                              1. re: sunshine842

                                                Didn't see charcoal/lighter fluid, and propane. After major Hurricanes Alicia 1983, and Ike 2008, Houston, I made great use of my grill. After Ike virtually everyone was out grilling at my apartment complex.

                                                1. re: James Cristinian

                                                  the list and recipes are intended for non-cooking.

                                                  1. re: James Cristinian

                                                    You didn't have to worry about broken gas lines, etc.? Also, you were cooking meats you already had on hand? Defrosting them from the freezer?

                                                    You bring up a couple of good points. 1) this is not a comprehensive emergency preparedness shopping list. It's only the shopping list for these particular recipes which, as sunshine points out, require no cooking (except for the one they have you make the day before) and no refrigeration and 2) they do tell you if you lose power to start eating out of your fridge and freezer first. It seems to me you're going to need a heat source for that.

                                                    ~TDQ

                                                  2. re: sunshine842

                                                    I wish we didn't have to worry about stuff like this, but it's just prudent. I'm trying to get all of my ducks in a row.

                                                    ~TDQ

                                                    1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                      here in FL, it's a yearly tradition -- you put together your box of hurricane supplies at the beginning of the season -- everything goes in a big tote to pull out when the evacuation and/or warning is sounded...

                                                      ...then you empty it all out and give it to the food bank around the holidays.

                                                      and I don't have mine put together for this year.

                                                      1. re: sunshine842

                                                        Well, I guess it's time for you to get started. When did hurricane season begin?

                                                        I like the cyclical way you describe it. You assemble your box at the beginning and donate it at the end.

                                                        ~TDQ

                                                        1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                          We do this, but since we're in earthquake and fire country, we inventory and re-supply in the early fall. Works great, 'cause there are always donation bins springing up around then for the upcoming Thanksgiving. We donate any canned goods, use the bottled water for plants, and re-do the car supply (we buy those foil packets of water, plus canned nuts, trail bars, etc, & keep them in the trunk in a ready-to-go backpack).

                                                          1. re: pine time

                                                            See, I need to schedule it and just check stuff once a year.

                                                            ~TDQ

                                                            1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                              TDQ, yup, choose a date and put it annually on your calendar. Since our fire season (related to autumn Santa Anas) begins about September, I update our supplies every August. For the gallon jugs of water, however, I write the date on 'em and replace those every 6 months.

                                                              1. re: pine time

                                                                Well, I think I'm pretty well-prepared for summer at this point, but when winter approaches, I think I will want to re-assess for winter needs. I might either make it a twice a year thing or just check it in winter (when I have nothing better to do anyway).

                                                                What do you do about canned goods? I swear this is one of the biggest barriers for our emergency preparedness. I buy all of these canned goods --mostly meats and vegetables--for my emergency kit that I never use (really, I only use canned beans and various tomato products) and then they hang around and get so dusty, etc. that I lose track of how long I've had them.

                                                                Do you mark them and toss after a certain number of years? Donate them and replace them every year?

                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                  Use a sharpie and write the date on the top of the cans, then rotate them as you buy them. When you use or donate the oldest ones replace them with something else, mark them and rotate them to the back. (I'm another earthquake country resident.)

                                                                  1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                    Donate to a food bank while items are still in date, if you aren't going to use them. We're not talking huge sums of money here for canned goods.

                                                                    Don't donate years old commodities. They'll probably just get tossed, and in a way, it's disrespectful.

                                                                    An e-kit is one of those sunk costs in life. You may only need it once a decade, but you either create one or go without when you really need it.

                                                                    In the Northridge quake in the early 90s, my neighbors got together to grill things that were beginning to thaw in freezers. I was surprised how many people had nothing stored for emergencies. Everything people brought to cook up was literally inhaled as soon as it came off the grill. Didn't matter what it was.

                                                                    1. re: RelishPDX

                                                                      I don't think canned foods (tuna, beans, vegetables, etc.) are marked with an expiration date, are they? So how do you know whether they are still in date, whether for personal use or for donation?

                                                                      I'm not being cheap here. I genuinely don't know when they are good and when they aren't!

                                                                      ~TDQ

                                                                      1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                        I just checked both beans and soup and both are stamped on the bottom of the can with "best by" dates.

                                                                        As relish mentioned, make sure you are donating them at least 6 months prior to that date.

                                                                        1. re: weezieduzzit

                                                                          Huh. I will have to look at my cans again. How could I not notice that all these years?

                                                                          ~TDQ

                                                                          1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                            Here are some general guidelines: http://www.nestle-family.com/nutritio...

                                                                            1. re: weezieduzzit

                                                                              Oh my. So what it DOESN"T say is that canned goods last almost forever. I wouldn't be surprised if we have some things lurking about our cupboards that we moved in with almost a decade ago. Might be time to toss it all. But, that might make me feel like a bad human being for food waste.

                                                                              "Canned foods have a long shelf life, but that shouldn’t mean that you keep them for several years before using them. High-acid canned foods such as juices, tomatoes, fruits and pickles will store well for 12 to 18 months. Whereas low-acid canned foods such as meat products and vegetables will store well for 2-4 years.However, there may be some changes in quality, such as a change in colour and texture."

                                                                              ~TDQ

                                                                            2. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                              It seems to differ from food bank to food bank. While I wouldn't knowingly donate expired foods, one of our local places says to bring in anything, and they'll make the decision whether or not to use it.

                                                                              1. re: pine time

                                                                                Actually, mine says that too. Just donate it, let them sort it out.

                                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                                1. re: pine time

                                                                                  Ours says they are required not to used expired goods.

                                                                                  1. re: foiegras

                                                                                    I'm donating canned goods in November that I bought in June or July.

                                                                                    No issue.

                                                                            3. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                              I just checked mine too, and all of the canned goods in my pantry are marked with a "best by" date on the top or bottom.

                                                                              One is expired by a couple of months (oops!). It's a can of sliced bamboo shoots I bought about a year or so ago. But it also has a manufactured date of 2012 stamped on it, so I guess it's probably still okay to eat.

                                                                              1. re: RelishPDX

                                                                                I am absolutely astonished that I've never noticed the cans have a best by date, but mostly because I would swear to you that I've checked for them in the past.I will check tonight for sure because I'm dying to know!

                                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                                1. re: RelishPDX

                                                                                  All of mine are dated too! How have I never noticed?!? That makes it much easier to keep things current!

                                                                                  ~TDQ

                                                                              2. re: RelishPDX

                                                                                I'll never forget the morning after the '89 San Francisco earthquake. People were in a shopping panic--grocery store shelves were bare (and I don't mean because everything fell off the shelves!), especially in the water, batteries, candles sections. So bizarre. So, yeah, I can believe that people have nothing on hand despite having it constantly drilled into them.

                                                                                Do you not have to worry about broken gas lines when you grill outside?

                                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                                1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                  We grill outside when we have no electricity too - never thought about gas lines being a problem. Why would they be (I'm asking this seriously - something new for me to worry about)?

                                                                                  I remember a wonderful dinner one night when power went out (and I don't remember there being a specific reason - hey, we live in the south, sometimes you just don't have power ... or the phone doesn't work because it is raining ... or whatever), and I was somewhat panicked, and my husband said "let's just put it on the grill" and we had a wonderful grilled fish and salad and some sort of carb done on the grill and had candles for light and it was lovely.

                                                                                  That said, we've looked into a generator. We'd love to have one, but loads of town regulations and hoops to jump through. Hoping we can find the time to do them before the next outage.

                                                                                  1. re: LulusMom

                                                                                    I don't know. I just know gas lines get broken in earthquakes, hurricanes and tornadoes and you're supposed to be careful not to ignite anything. But, maybe that's only indoors? I suppose outsdoors, as long as you're not standing on top of the broken gas line the gas has the entire atmosphere in which to dissipate and, therefore, is not an issue?

                                                                                    ~TDQ

                                                                                    1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                      OK. Yeah, if it was an earthquake I'd be nervous. And if there was a hurricane I doubt we'd be *able* to stand outside and grill, what with the wind and rain.

                                                                                      1. re: LulusMom

                                                                                        Right, but after the hurricane would you feel it was safe to grill? After the storm had moved on and the winds had died down and you're just standing in the midst of a mess? I have some friends in Houston and it sounded like they were practically having the entire neighborhood over for a party before and after one of these big hurricanes a few years ago. They had boarded up all of their windows and we're having the time of their lives, I swear (that's how it sounded, though I'm sure it was scary as all heck and one of those you might as well laugh instead of cry occasions.)

                                                                                        ~TDQ

                                                                                        1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                          Not a substitute for real cooking (or certainly not grilling), but we keep cans of Sterno on hand (from the camping supply store) for basic heating of food during an emergency. Wouldn't use it if there were ruptured gas lines that we knew of, but it's better than cold canned soup (it's bad enough hot).

                                                                                          1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                            Yes, right after the storm it is perfectly fine. Usually quite calm (sort of like the calm before the storm - also a calm after one).

                                                                                            1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                              Nobody grills DURING the storm -- and the storm typically doesn't last that long -- 12-15 hours would be a really slow-moving storm.

                                                                                              After the storm, the grill is probably your own shot at cooking anything...so as long as you have a propane tank or two, you're (ahem) cookin' with gas.

                                                                                              1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                                Or charcoal and lighter fluid. I bought the next to last bag of charcoal at the local Ace before Ike gave us a nice shot in Houston, but devastated Galveston, Galveston Bay, and the Bolivar Peninsula, a cat two with a 20 foot surge. I digress but never take any tropical system, even a tropical storm for granted, every one is different, many killers, some pussy cats. Just because the last one was a pussy cat, the next one may kill you.

                                                                                                1. re: James Cristinian

                                                                                                  Yep -- sat through Charlie and Frances that year, and was delayed getting home from vacation because Jeanne putzed around with the air schedules.

                                                                                                2. re: sunshine842

                                                                                                  I could of grilled on my patio during Ike in Houston. 70 mile an hour sustained winds from the north for 8 hours or so, but not a drop of rain on the south facing patio. I spent the wee hours of the morning managing the storm from my "command post" couch alternating with the patio watching transformers pop, the wind howl, and horizontal torrential rain. It sounds crazy, but I enjoyed it being an amateur weather nut since a child. I took a couple of classes in college, but weather is mostly observation, like the old timers did it.

                                                                                    2. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                      If it's there, I use the "best by" date to rotate 'em out of the house. When I'm organized, I keep the emergency canned stuff in a separate area of the pantry, and all that goes to donation about mid-October (it also helps that I'm a lifetime member of Weight Watchers, who usually does a canned food drive for charity in the autumn). Then I replace them for the next year.

                                                                                      1. re: pine time

                                                                                        This seems easier to me, I think. Just donating the whole lot of it and rebuying it.

                                                                                        ~TDQ

                                                                                        1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                          Consider that car pack, too. Since many of us spend tremendous amounts of time commuting, what would you do if stranded (storms/earthquake, et al or even a breakdown) in your car? We have that backpack that lives in the trunk, and I even added a pair of cheap flat shoes--no way I could hike out, if needed, in dress shoes. Amazon Prime also often has the foil packets of water available. (In our experience, jugs of water just don't hold up in the heat of a car trunk.) Oh, and a couple of those aluminum foil looking emergency blankets. I'd rather be safe than sorry (having been evacuated twice from Santa Ana fires).

                                                                                          1. re: pine time

                                                                                            Actually, I'm more worried about being stranded in my car on the side of the road in winter due to sliding on a patch of ice than anything else.

                                                                                            I do have kits in my car but the wild card is my husband who takes stuff out (my car is the one we use to haul around stuff) and then absent-mindedly forgets to put it back.

                                                                                            I kid you not: I did not have an ice scraper in my car for the first snow storm this year because he took it out and forgot to put it back. Along with my shovel and my spare snowboots! Makes me nuts!

                                                                                            ~TDQ

                                                                                            1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                              On a recent 90 degree day, I saw a woman removing her snow shovel from the trunk to be able to load her filled grocery bags under it. My shovel comes out in May, when I make sure the sun shield is still in there, and gets put back in Oct. when I make sure the snow brush / scraper is in place. That would be OK timing for the emergency food supply inventory update, too.

                                                                              3. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                Hurricane season starts June 1st but doesn't get cranked up until mid-August, although there are exceptions.

                                                                                1. re: James Cristinian

                                                                                  Ah, okay. Well, sunshine isn't TOO far behind in her preparations then!

                                                                                  ~TDQ

                                                                                2. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                  heh. June 1. Yeah, I'm a little behind again this year (but it's been completely silent thus far)

                                                                          2. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                            this is a good resource. thanks! i live in seattle (downtown) so i am not in what is generally considered a high disaster risk area. however, we do usually have 1-2 genuinely massive winter storms a year, and the periodic significant earthquake. downtown usually fares ok (except when it doesn't and then it's awful) but at my parents' out in the suburbs growing up we lost power several times a winter, usually 3-7 days without power. they have a generator now, but in my apartment i don't.

                                                                            ever since i lived through the 2011 japanese earthquake (i lived about an hour by car from sendai), i've been maniacal about emergency preparedness. the people i was with had nothing in the way of supplies, and everything was rationed (once we could even get to town and the stores could operate albeit without power...) so feeding myself and my two companions was pretty tough the first week! these are great tools in the arsenal - i'll be stocking up.

                                                                            1. re: chartreauxx

                                                                              I once was appointed the Official Head of our workplace emergency supply group. When I inventoried, we had one of those 3 lb. (?) cans of tuna, but no can opener. That was it for food & there was no water or other drinkables. There was 1 flashlight for a staff of over 50, and, of course, the batteries had expired about 4 years back. We bought flashlights to be kept at every employee's desk. Seems some folks just don't think systematically!

                                                                              1. re: pine time

                                                                                One 3 lb can of tuna for 50+ people? Maybe they didn't bother with the can opener because there was no point in dividing such a pitiful amount of tuna among 50 people!

                                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                                1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                  Obviously, not a whole lot of thought and effort was put into that planning!

                                                                              2. re: chartreauxx

                                                                                Wow! That was some earthquake! I'm glad you came out of it okay, especially considering the people you were with had nothing. Do you have any wisdom to impart about what you particularly craved or found particularly useful to have on hand? Or things you were surprised turned out to be of little concern to you?

                                                                                ~TDQ

                                                                                1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                  water. stock way more than you think you'll need, or have a means to melt/boil it to drink. in case you end up having to drink water from less desirable sources like creeks or ditches, keep either microfilter bottles or powerful sterilizing tablets on hand. more than you think you'll need. we didn't really have resources to speak of for about a week, so 3 days may not be enough. water first, food second. powdered drink additives like gatorade can be helpful when every calorie counts. instant noodles - better boiled, but can be eaten raw. canned food like soup or chili; canned meat of any kind. don't sneer at spam, it is calorically rich. i keep boxes and boxes of clif bars and a rack of ensure plus on hand at all times. nuts and dried fruit, too. pickled and fermented foods are good also. store ALL emergency supplies in a box you trust not to let them get wet, crushed, or torn open. cans. corn chowder was one of the first meals we were able to put together once we had stove access again. blankets. don't forget to stock pet food and water for the pet if you have one. consider asking your pharmacist if there's a way to get a weeks' worth or so of any critical medications to keep on hand just in case.

                                                                                  sorry, i know none of this is gourmet. but we weren't planning ahead and our options were limited :-)

                                                                                  1. re: chartreauxx

                                                                                    This is fantastic advice, thank you so much.

                                                                                    I just have the water sterilizing tables that came with my pre-packed emergency kits (the ones that come with the little packets of water and MRE's). Are those good enough or do you have a brand you specifically recommend?

                                                                                    I always wondered what to do about the medications. I shall ask.

                                                                                    I've always avoided noodles because I didn't want to expend the water to cook them. It never occurred to me that, of course, you can eat them uncooked!

                                                                                    Did you find it was worthwhile to drink or save the liquid you poured off from canned vegetables?

                                                                                    ~TDQ

                                                                                    1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                      if you ask, many pharmacists can "advance" you a small number of pills. your doctor can also write a note authorizing an emergency supply.

                                                                                    2. re: chartreauxx

                                                                                      So, thank you for all of this. It really made me rethink my plans a little. Given the kinds of disasters that are typical where I live: tornadoes, snowstorms, and thunderstorms, I think it's unlikely I'll ever need a 3 (or more) day supply, but why not be prepared anyway? You just never know what's going to come along in life. And with global climate change underway, you just don't really know what lies ahead.

                                                                                      If I'm going to bother to do it, I'm going to do it right. So, I'm stocking up on a bit more water and thinking fairly seriously about what the dangers might be. The dangers (during tornado and thunderstorm season, which is now) are that it would be steamy hot and that you'd really need a lot of water or risk dehydration. And if sanitation were poor, you might have some gastro issues that could increase your risk of dehydration. So I've stocked up on some immodium and pepto as well as some pedialyte powder to mix into water for the kiddo. I've also read (Sesame Street has a disaster preparedness site!) that young children often revert to younger behaviors when traumatized, so I've allowed for the possibility that might child would feel more comfortable drinking his nutrition than eating it.

                                                                                      ~TDQ

                                                                                      1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                        i never thought i'd spend that long without basic modern conveniences, either! but then it happened. i was lucky to be young and healthy, as were my companions. many, MANY people in the japanese quake died from complications such as not having their heart medication...and not knowing the dose or prescription from memory when asked by aid workers. hospitals all along the eastern coast had been destroyed, along with medical records, so people in shelters simply had to remember their prescriptions. frequently they'd already done without for days by the time help arrived, and when asked, didn't know the details. sadly, this is one among many causes of death in that event. it certainly taught me not to assume anything: my area was lucky in that we were not hit by a tsunami. we had the original quake and numerous large aftershocks, as well as a blizzard hard on the heels of the 9.0., and we did lose power, gas, and running water for many days. even once those were restored, resources were strictly rationed for a good bit longer. fortunately, neighbors tended to band together and share what they had... but the thing is, nobody had any idea the fault line off the east coast of tohoku could produce such a quake. for as long as i am aware, the assumption had been that a quake like that would happen much further south in kanto region.

                                                                                        i don't mean to panic you, and i know my experience is a statistical outlier. it simply taught me that it is far, FAR better to be too prepared (and hopefully never need it!) than to be underprepared and caught with your pants down.

                                                                                        1. re: chartreauxx

                                                                                          Wow. How very sad. I never really thought of medications being such a problem because we always assume we can get them, but, yeah, I suppose if something catastrophic happens, you can't rely on everyone else's recordkeeping to help you out in the time frame you may need it.

                                                                                          The good thing is, depending on how you set your kit up, there are lots of things you only need to do once or once every year or two. Then you can forget about it. Although, you do have to remember to make changes if your family expands or if your medications change, etc.

                                                                                          ~TDQ

                                                                                        2. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                          A friend of mine said he would never get one of those tankless water heaters .. he's keeping his 50 gal one because it's a good source of water if there's an earthquake (we're in N. Cal.).

                                                                                          Many people don't think to stock up on dog/cat food for the pets!

                                                                                    3. re: chartreauxx

                                                                                      «i live in seattle (downtown) so i am not in what is generally considered a high disaster risk area.»

                                                                                      Mt. Rainier is an active volcano.

                                                                                      http://nationalatlas.gov/articles/geo...

                                                                                      1. re: RelishPDX

                                                                                        oh yes but if that happens i figure i have bigger problems :-) rainier and yellowstone are sort of an "i'm not sure you *can* prepare" situation... i was thinking more in terms of annual/regular events, such as hurricanes and earthquakes. though we certainly get our share of major winter storms, too...

                                                                                        1. re: chartreauxx

                                                                                          From what I recall reading a few years ago, the biggest danger to the Seattle area is from ash, and the disruption of services and deliveries to the Seattle area due to ash cover.

                                                                                          I remember friends living in Spokane when Mt. St. Helens blew reporting that they had a heck of a time for at least a week.

                                                                                          1. re: RelishPDX

                                                                                            seattle is lucky in that prevailing winds tend to blow ash east, not west. most ash would go toward yakima, not seattle. while tacoma, puyallup etc are likely to be buried by lahars, seattle is most likely too far away to get hit. no historically known lahar has reached seattle - if it did, as i said, the eruption would be one beyond normal preparation. the only slight threat to seattle is the slim possibility of tsunami-like waves due to lahars flowing into surrounding bodies of water, but this chance is very small. seattle's main danger would probably just be earthquakes from the eruption.

                                                                                  2. I live in California and live in a flood zone, but luckily not near an earth quake fault, but you never know. I don't need the Mayo Clinic for my meal plan. My plan is to stock up on water and order three baskets from Swiss Colony. I figure I can gorge myself on petite fours and summer sausage until I am rescued.

                                                                                    4 Replies
                                                                                    1. re: free sample addict aka Tracy L

                                                                                      As long as you have a plan!

                                                                                      I was thinking of getting a Hickory Farms basket to supplement our emergency supplies. Do you know how Swiss Colony compares?

                                                                                      ~TDQ

                                                                                      1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                        I ran across this site:

                                                                                        http://wisconsincheesemart.com

                                                                                        ... when people were lamenting the morphing of Hickory Farms' Beef Stick into Summer Sausage, or something.

                                                                                        They've got some very nice stuff. I've not ordered anything from Swiss Colony in years, but I recall not being all that impressed in comparison to Hickory Farms.

                                                                                        1. re: RelishPDX

                                                                                          Thanks!

                                                                                          Yeah, my husband thinks Hickory Farms edges out Swiss Colony, too. I wondered if that was just him or what.

                                                                                          ~TDQ

                                                                                        2. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                          Hickory Farms is better, but I seem to remember preferring Swiss Colony's petit fours.

                                                                                      2. always so helpful DQ.
                                                                                        appreciate you ...

                                                                                        2 Replies
                                                                                        1. re: iL Divo

                                                                                          That's so kind of you to say, thank you!

                                                                                          ~TDQ

                                                                                          1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                            I only speak the truth DQ, I'm appreciative of you&your input.

                                                                                        2. Heads up: the links you provided link me to more recent posts.

                                                                                          Still...appreciate what you are trying to do.

                                                                                          ~Everyone~ should be prepared to eat/drink and perform basic hygiene without city services for at least ~48 hours or so (many will argue longer...). It doesn't take a "major" disaster, as we learned during some local flooding a few years ago.

                                                                                          7 Replies
                                                                                          1. re: pedalfaster

                                                                                            I don't know how to link to a specific post within this thread, but did you see my post from June 22, 2014 that kind of "revived" this thread from its slumber? I provide some updated links in that post that should take you to the recipes and shopping list...

                                                                                            ~TDQ

                                                                                            1. re: pedalfaster

                                                                                              I've lived in Sri Lanka, where water and power outages of 12 hours or longer are common - sometimes for several days - and everyone keeps water stored. If you can afford it, you have a 150 or so liter storage tank. If not, you keep at least a few buckets full of water. Stoves are generally gas, wood, or other combustables, not electricity, and the gas is not from lines but from bottles that you get refilled.

                                                                                              1. re: LMAshton

                                                                                                in Florida, they tell you to scrub out the bathtub and fill it with water...that's a fair amount of water.

                                                                                                (We have a pool...while I wouldn't drink it or use it for cooking, it would give us more than enough water for bathing, flushing, and cleaning up until things were restored...)

                                                                                                1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                                  Sure, but storing the water in the bathtub requires planning. In Sri Lanka, water outages occur without warning, so that would be impractical, even given that no one has bathtubs there.

                                                                                                  1. re: LMAshton

                                                                                                    We only store water in the tub for flushing toilets in case of a major hurricane, even with poor forecasting predictions by the hurricane center, we have plenty of time.

                                                                                                    1. re: LMAshton

                                                                                                      I wasn't arguing with you -- just stating the SOP where I live.

                                                                                                      I'd be buying jerry cans and keeping them full so I at least had water for drinking and cooking.

                                                                                                      1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                                        .....and Florida where you are, and Texas where I am are nowhere near Sri Lanka, and bathtubs are very common. What I did during the last major hurricane was to take all the perishables out of the refrigerator and put them on ice in a couple of ice chests. I had a bunch of speckled trout and redfish I'd caught that summer frozen in blocks of water. I duct taped shut both so I wouldn't open them by mistake knowing the freezer would keep 72 hours. We lucked out and had power back in 36 hours, while others, some just down the road had none for up to a month. It helps living next to a hospital.

                                                                                              2. The Amish actually can meat in much the same way as you would can fruits or vegetables. Not my cup 'o tea, but if you do a search for "Amish canned meat", you will find quite a bit.

                                                                                                4 Replies
                                                                                                1. re: PattiCakes

                                                                                                  if you have a pressure canner and follow the instructions, it's no biggie.

                                                                                                  1. re: sunshine842

                                                                                                    Yup. Many people in my family do this. But then, we're from Mennonite stock, so perhaps it's much less surprising...

                                                                                                    1. re: LMAshton

                                                                                                      Which meats and what are your favorite things to do with it?

                                                                                                      ~TDQ

                                                                                                      1. re: The Dairy Queen

                                                                                                        I haven't done it since I was a teenager. Back then, it was whatever fish was caught, chicken, beef, pork. And that was so long ago that I hardly remember what we did.

                                                                                                2. If you're going to cook and refrigerate ahead of time, be sure you lay your hands on all the ice you can get if a land falling hurricane is imminent.