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Help! Can anyone identify this copper saucepan?

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I've found this pan on ebay it looks like a great deal. I was wondering who makes it and whether or not it is lined with tin or stainless. Any info would be appreciated as I'd rather not lose it. Halp!

-Thanks

 
 
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  1. Anyone? :<

    1. Welp I bought the pot. It was too good a deal to pass up. Guess we'll find out what it is soon enough lol. Still interested in opinions though. Can always resell...

      1. Hi, Wapptor:

        You didn't give much info (But neither did the eBay seller in his listing).

        The high loop handle is a clue, as it suggests Tornus or Revereware, but I would expect there to be a maker's mark. You might also look for a very small "made in Korea" mark.

        Let us know when it arrives.

        Aloha,
        Kaleo

        1 Reply
        1. re: kaleokahu

          The seller didn't seem to know much. He claimed the pot was a gift and that he never used it because it was "too pretty." He thought the interior was aluminum but then sent me another message saying it "looked like his all clad pot and was probably stainless." I'm kind of assuming he doesn't really know what it is. The pot was only $40 and if it is a quality piece and unused then it was a steal. Can't wait to get it :D

        2. I have spent the past two days obsessively trying to find any info on this pan. I'm so afraid now that it's going to be aluminum with copper lining or some terrible nickel lined pan that I can't cook in or SOMETHING bad. What are the odds this is a real/usable pan. The pictures don't give a lot of information do they? *stressing*

          1 Reply
          1. re: Wapptor

            Hi, Wapptor:

            Relax. There's a high probability that this pan is stainless lined copper (bimetal).

            Let's be hopeful--sometimes poorly-described or -pictured pans from unknowledgeable eBay sellers can be very good deals.

            The worst that can happen is that you resell it on eBay, etc., under a *good* description and photo, and maybe break even. Or simply return it and lose 1/2 the postage.

            Aloha,
            Kaleo

          2. I don't know who makes it, but it appears not to be a Revere. At least from what I've seen, the handles on Revere's copper pots are shaped differently, as are the rivets. In any case, I'm betting that this is copper over stainless. The rivets appear to be stainless, and you can see the concentric circular brush marks. I know that copper can be layered with aluminum, but I'm not aware of any aluminum-lined copper bi-metal pans.

            8 Replies
            1. re: jljohn

              That would be wonderful. I'm hoping for the conductivity of copper but the durability of stainless. Here's hoping! $40!!!!

              1. re: jljohn

                Humm, I did not see your post when I posted, I see what you mean, Revere does not have rivets through the lid and the handle is straighter. Hope it is a decent pot. The handle will get quite hot.

                1. re: ksbikecommuter

                  It looks similar (which makes one worry that it's a knockoff) but the handle (on the lid) shape is really unique. I've spent the past two days trying to find something that looks identical and have had no luck. The pan is supposed to get here on friday so I'm hoping once I get my hands on it I can see if there's any small markings or any identifying factors. Will let you guys know.

                  1. re: ksbikecommuter

                    Why do they make handles like that if they get really hot? Seems an odd tradition to uphold if you ask me. Just how hot do they get and what's the best way to deal with it?

                    1. re: Wapptor

                      Basically, brass conducts heat a lot quicker than cast iron, so cast iron stays cooler longer, but if you are going to have a pot on the stove for more than 5 or 10 minutes, either would be so hot that you would need a hot pad. In this functional sense, cast iron is only really beneficial on a fry or saute pan where the time on the burner is only a couple of minutes.

                      Everything else is aesthetics or association with quality. Brass is easier to maintain than cast iron, but many associate cast iron with thicker copper. In a way, stainless would be the most functional, but because it has no foothold in tradition, and is recently only used on very thin copper, I don't see it taking hold any time soon.

                      The best way to deal with it is to keep cloths or hot pad next to your stove. Any sort of tea towel would work, but (don't laugh) in my experience the absolute best hot pat / towel for next to the stove is this: http://www.amazon.com/OsoCozy-Indian-... They run $18-24 per dozen, they are THICK, and I can keep a stack of them in the cupboard next to the stove and toss them in the hamper when soiled and never run out!

                      1. re: Wapptor

                        Hi, Wapptor:

                        Why? Several reasons besides tradition and aesthetics. Brass is really easy to cast, naturally very malleable and ductile, and finishes beautifully. Cast iron is naturally brittle, and to render it malleable, it must be first cast correctly, and then annealed, sometimes differentially. It doesn't polish up particularly well, either. For some reason, brass handles are usually thinner and therefore lighter, too.

                        How hot? Hot enough to burn you. With all respect to Jeremy, I think it's not just a matter of a few minutes' time and then iron handles are just as hot. My brass-handled round skillet is untouchable (bare-handed) in just a few minutes, whereas my iron-handled sautes and fish pan can go a good long time and still be bare-handed. I have not verified this with my IR gun, but I don't think the iron handles ever get quite as hot on the top, either. IME, even after reaching equilibrium, I can move my iron-handled saucepans on the top, but the brass handles will make my bare hand absolutely recoil. Also, if you cook on a gas or solid top, both iron and brass will generally get hotter faster than if you're using resistive or radiant electric.

                        How to deal? A side towel. I leave a couple black ones hanging on my stove's front rail. I also have a couple slide-on silicone handle sleeves for my brass-handled skillets that work OK.

                        Really, it doesn't matter what the metal of the handle is as long as you use something *all the time*. I burn myself occasionally when I get busy/lazy and I put a brass handle into the mix. My problem is more realizing which handle is brass before I touch it.

                        Aloha,
                        Kaleo

                        1. re: kaleokahu

                          I'm going to burn my hand and I'm going to feel really awful when my girlfriend burns HER hand. -.-

                          1. re: Wapptor

                            Then your $40 pan becomes a $41.36 pan when you slip on a silicone sleeve. http://www.hotelrestaurantsupply.com/...

                            No worries.

                  2. Hi It lookes like some Revereware that I have, known as the Paul Revere Ware line. Here is a bit of history taken from this sight http://reverewarehistory.wordpress.com/

                    "Recognizing that a high-end consumer market existed for the solid copper cookware commonly in use by professional chefs, Revere introduced the Paul Revere Ware line in 1967. Produced only at the Oneonta, AL plant, the copper/stainless steel material it used was made in house using a high temperature, pressure-bonding process, not the traditional Revere electro-plating process. Designed as much (or more) for visual appeal as for function, the solid brass handles were attached with rivets welded to the bodies (producing a riveted handle with no exposed rivet heads on the cooking surface. The line included numerous specialty pieces: omelet, crepes suzette, fondue, and Au Gratin pans; casseroles, even a flambe set with alcohol burner and tray. Initial production carried “Limited Edition Collection” stamped on the undersides of the handles while a stylized Paul Revere “signature” was later added to the underside of each piece. This combination was designated the “Paul Revere Signature Collection” when the handle imprint was removed. A special issue commemorating the American Bicentennial added “1776-1976″ to the hallmark. The “signature” was also used on teakettles, serving trays, and mixing bowls which were later additions to the line (these were simply units produced for the 1400 line with the signature added). By 1978, the line had grown to include 33 different pieces, making it the largest line produced by Revere since the Revere Ware 1400 line of the mid 1950′s."