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Pressure cooker quick release vs. "cold water" pressure release

m
mike2401 Jan 30, 2013 04:28 AM

I'm reading through my Fagor pressure cooker manual and it suggested that:

"Cold Water Release Method: for certain delicate foods and veggies, you will want to release the pressure as quickly as possible in order to stop the cooking process. The quickest way to do this is to take the pressure cooker from the stove to the sink and run cold water over the lid"

QUESTION:

How the heck is that faster than just turning the dial to the 'release steam' position? The pressure is evacuated in about 30 seconds.

Thanks for any thoughts,
Mike

  1. Chemicalkinetics Jan 30, 2013 06:47 AM

    Great question Mike. I usually do the pressure release which 30 seconds. In my opinion, the cold water method is not faster in term of opening the lid.

    However, I do understand what the passage was trying to say. It isn't about the opening of the lid, but the cooling of the food.

    In the case of the pressure release method, the pressure is released to atmosphere pressure, but the food content is still hot after the pressure released. In the case of water, it means the water is boiling at 100 oC instead of 121 oC, but the food content is still being cooked at 100 oC -- especially if they are not removed.

    In the case of water cooling, the content will likely cool down lower than 100 oC, and you can continue to keep the whole pot in the water to cool down.

    In other words, the "water running" method is not quicker to open the lid, but it is quicker to cool the food.

    3 Replies
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
      m
      mike2401 Jan 30, 2013 07:09 AM

      Thank makes perfect sense, thank you!

      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
        m
        mike2401 Jan 30, 2013 07:02 PM

        Having just finished a super-hot bone broth, I was trying to cool it enough to put in the fridge. What I did (pictured below) was a pain.

        Maybe next time I'll run cold water over the pressure cooker, and add extra ice on the outside to cool the whole thing, before pouring hot liquid through a strainer.

        Mike

         
        1. re: mike2401
          Chemicalkinetics Jan 30, 2013 07:19 PM

          <Maybe next time I'll run cold water over the pressure cooker, and add extra ice on the outside to cool the whole thing, before pouring hot liquid through a strainer.>

          I know. Sometime it is a pain to cool large volume of broth. Like you said, using cold water and ice help. Sometime I just "build in" the cooling time as part of the cooking time as we have discussed in another post. One time, it was really late (~4 AM) and I really wanted to cool the stock, so I poured the hot liquid back and forth between two pots, but you can imagine that is messy.

          I am thinking, have not tried, is to use those cold metal ice cubes:

          http://www.jocundist.com/2011/10/stai...

          No, we don't need the fancy ones like those for the Scotch. Basically, it is all about heat exchange, and putting cold objects inside the liquid will cool down far quicker than putting cold objects outside the pot. Of course, real water ice cubes work too if you don't mind the dilution effect.

          P.S.: I think I read from another threads where they are some good suggestions of using ice cold water bottle too. Cheaper. I just worry about plastic smell and taste coming off at hot temperature

      2. pazzaglia Jan 30, 2013 06:19 AM

        Mike, I read your other messages and it looks like your cooker is not going fully up to pressure - which would explain why doing the "Normal Release" is so fast for you. Here are the pressure cooker releases and the time they usually take.

        Normal Release - twisting the knob or pushing the button, about 2 minutes.

        Natural Release - do nothing and wait, usually 10 to 20 minutes depending on how full the cooker is.

        Cold-water Quick Release - cooling the lid with water in the sink, about 20 seconds.

        Great job reading the manual!!

        Ciao,

        L

        3 Replies
        1. re: pazzaglia
          m
          mike2401 Jan 30, 2013 07:10 AM

          I agree with your conclusion.

          If steam is not leaking out from around the gasket, does that suggest the problem is with the knob/valve?

          Maybe I should read the manual and see how to take it apart and re-insert it,

          Mike

          1. re: mike2401
            Chemicalkinetics Jan 30, 2013 08:27 AM

            <If steam is not leaking out from around the gasket, does that suggest the problem is with the knob/valve? >

            You mean the silicone gasket between the lid and the pot, right?

            http://fastcooking.ca/img/fagor_duo_pressure_cooker_lid_off.jpg

            I don't think air should leak out from the gasket. It should leak from the knob/valve. In the case of Fagor, it has two locations to release pressure.

            http://4imgs.com/1035/sys/prod/6244_2...

            One of them is the hole facing you in the photo. The other 360o is around the knob.

            P.S.: I thought you bought Kuhn Rikon. Guess not.

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
              m
              mike2401 Jan 30, 2013 09:09 AM

              thanks for the pictures. Yes: correct, when I said gasket, I meant the big blue one around the entire lid.

              Seeing the picture of the knob thing, maybe that's not seated well. I can't wait to get home and try it.

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