HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >
What have you made lately? Tell us about it
TELL US

Camping stove? I really need this.

s
sweetfern Jan 29, 2013 12:07 PM

I drive a Prius, so nothing to let down to hold a stove. Any ideas?
Oh--and 1 or 2 person popup tent? Any tips very welcome.

Gratefully yours,

sweetfern

  1. monkeyrotica Feb 4, 2013 08:38 AM

    If you're camping by your car, a cheap Coleman 2 burner is hard to beat for reliability. Those wind shields come in real handy, too.

    If you're hiking and want something small and eco friendly, hit the military surplus sites for a Swiss Volcano Stove. Great for boiling water and starts quick with dry tinder and twigs. A scrap of dryer lint makes a great starter.

    I've had a North Face tent for decades. Rock solid. REI's inhouse brand tents are also a good deal.

    1 Reply
    1. re: monkeyrotica
      l
      latindancer Feb 10, 2013 09:07 PM

      +!.

      Anything North Face rocks and all your other recs are spot on.
      My expedition tents are lifesavers, literally.

    2. s
      soapboxpreacher Feb 4, 2013 08:27 AM

      Ok I own more Camping stoves then my wife knows of! I have a problem...for I like to cook outdoors and when hiking so I have continued to look for the holy grail of camping stoves. There is however nothing that is of the holy grail of camping stoves. Only what purpose you want them for. If you are car camping with a family your needs are different if you are back packing. So here is what I have found. For Car camping the Camp Chef Everest 2 burner propane is the best! It is fast to heat, easy because of propane, and a lot cleaner and easier to maintain then white gas! However it is more expensive to operate (marginally). Control is excellent! You cannot go better. It his a fantastic stove that can simmer and boil like a good kitchen stove! It also folds up nice and packs down well. I have a Coleman DualFuel 2 burner that I do like it is just harder to controller, takes longer to get up (primed) and is mess when it comes to filling! I like it but the Camp Chef is way better for family car camping! No waiting to get up to flame and it is efficient as well.

      http://www.campchef.com/everest-2-bur...

      Now for hiking weight is king and your food is different...most are about freeze dried foods so your stove here will be small and centered around boiling water. Then there is the temperature in which you will be cooking the colder the harder with isobutane it is. Liquid/White Gas work better. I dont camp in these conditions for it is too hard on me! I have a jetboil for boiling water and back packing it runs on an isobutation blend, it is fast efficient and compact. But I could never simmer with it nor would you want to cook something very long on it. Canister style stoves like this have a total burn time around a hour on the small cans. But dehydrating food on the trail is fast and easy...just dont think it will be good...it is ok!

      Now Alcohol stoves are nice and work in the very cold! However they dont fend well in the wind and dont last long. I have a trangia and like it quite a bit. But it is hard to control and takes some to get use to using. It is cheap and built well but you have to pack fuel like you would with a white gas/liquid fuel stove.

      Finally my most versatile stove is my Primus Omni-Fuel! It does it all. It can use canister fuel, gasoline, kerosene, white gas, isobutane, and more! It is noisy but cant simmer pretty good! I like it but it is not something I would use for family camping for it is a single burner just like the jetboil and the trangia. It is meant for one person and is still limited. Depending on the fuel and how big the bottle is this thing can burn for a long time! I like it but it is also more of a back packing/hiking stove!

      For what I know and use the Camp Chef is stellar!! I like it a lot and it looks good and performs good. It is better then the other Coleman Propanes I have used and seems to be built better as well. It also has a nice stainless inside that makes it easier to clean! You cant go wrong with one!

      1. MikeB3542 Jan 31, 2013 05:34 PM

        Stove: Basic Coleman or Century/Primus 2-burner propane stoves are about perfect. Make sure to get the match-free model.

        Lantern: Basic Coleman or Century double-mantle propane lantern. Same thing...match-free. Should come with a plastic case. Buy lots of extra mantles.

        You can run these off of 1-pound disposable canisters. Better yet, get a small refillable propane tank and a distribution mast: the lantern screws into the top of the mast, and the stove is fed from one of the side taps.

        Tent: For two people, a 2-man tent is too small (unless backpacking). I REALLY like the Eureka!Tetragon 3...it's 7'x7', so room for a queen blow-up and a couple small gear bags. (BTW, the Tetragon 7 is similar but IMHO has a serious design flaw that will soak you...generally, Eureka! tents are a great value). A little larger (and what I use) is a Kelty Zodiac 4.

        For typical "three-season" use, you should get a double wall tent...a tent with breathable walls and a water-proof "bathtub" floor, covered with a waterproof fly. DO NOT get tents where the poles are attached to the tent with fabric sleeves....the tent should clip to the poles.

        Only really big tents allow you to stand up in...tents really should only be for sleeping anyway. For cooking or playing cards on a rainy day, a dining fly with a couple of poles will keep the wind and rain at bay. Upgrade to a screen shelter if you regularly are in skeeter country.

        10 Replies
        1. re: MikeB3542
          hill food Jan 31, 2013 10:09 PM

          according to the "team" we're not supposed to get into tents, but it is part of the original question.

          rule one - don't cook in the tent, and if you're in bear country, don't even have chewing gum in it. I about pissed myself late one night in the New Mexico Rockies when the snuffling started just inches from my head, luckily (luckily? in a 2 person pup? ehh, we were 15 yo boys) we'd been a few days w/o a shower so we smelled worse than the bear. I'd been late getting my canteen that had held kool-aid earlier into the bear bag so hid it under the wood pile. found it totally gashed apart the next AM. so- food-wise: hoist it up or be prepared to lose it and go hungry.

          tent-wise, the structures and fabrics pack up to almost nothing these days, so get the biggest you're willing to haul.

          1. re: MikeB3542
            paulj Jan 31, 2013 10:34 PM

            While I have one small propane lantern, mostly I use florescent, or more recently LED lanterns. A lantern, or head lamp, is a necessary part of the kitchen gear in the fall and winter, but less so in the summer, especially in northern areas where sundown can be 9pm or later.

            I like to keep my kitchen gear compact, so I can pack it up, and put it back in the car as soon as the dishes are washed. Canadian National Parks have a 'clean camp' policy, requiring all food stuffs be packed up and out of sight when you are in camp. Even if bears aren't a worry, smaller creatures can be. I've even had crows nibble on a silicone spatula.

            The fancier my cooking, the more I want it separate from tent and car. For example, frying a nice piece of fish can send a fine spray of aromatic oil droplets several feet away from the stove. Simply boiling water for a freeze dried meal or cup of instant coffee is much cleaner, and can even be done inside - with care.

            While I pack enough dry goods to last a week or more, it is always fun to shop locally. If going to Newfoundland, one of the first things I'd look for is place that sells Purity products, including their Hard Bread. I'm slowly working my way through 2 bags that I order from a Canadian retails years ago.
            http://www.purity.nf.ca/hardandsweet....
            Purity is also the main Canadian maker of Pilot Bread, one of my favorite camp 'breads'.

            1. re: paulj
              hill food Feb 1, 2013 12:02 AM

              a desperate bear can rip the roof off a car. I've seen their cubs (so cute) gnaw open specially built heavy timber boxes in the backwoods.

              rope, bag and abstinence are good tools. of course that won't stop a tenacious raccoon.

              OK that is a bit OT, but it is about food in the wilds, these are different considerations.

              1. re: hill food
                deet13 Feb 1, 2013 12:17 AM

                We used to drop mothballs around the campsite to deter bears, and then we'd have to hang the food bags up in the trees around camp.

                It usually worked.

                As for raccoons, the padlocked aluminum cooler I have in the back of my truck is about the only thing that I have ever used that was successful in keeping the little buggers out of our food.
                Like this one:

                http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12...

                1. re: hill food
                  paulj Feb 1, 2013 09:29 AM

                  What a bear will do depends a lot on their habituation to humans. Ripping doors off cars is something that Yosemite bears have learned to do. In most other places they are content to raid stuff left out in the open. I pay more attention to guidelines and warnings issued by local park officials than to the worst stories from California. If they provide bear boxes I use them; if they say 'keep a clean camp' I follow that.

                  1. re: paulj
                    s
                    sweetfern Feb 1, 2013 12:39 PM

                    I may have missed this--BTW I am taking notes--pots/pans,
                    cooking gear? Also, any clean-up hints gratefully accepted.
                    Along with tent I'll need new sleeping bag (maybe), air mattress, I guess. This is probably beyond what he team wants discussed. I am an AMC member so can check with them if we run out of gas here.

                    sweetfern

                    1. re: sweetfern
                      paulj Feb 1, 2013 05:57 PM

                      Generally at campgrounds it is easier to dispose of garbage than dish water. That's why I take plenty of heavy duty paper towels, and wipe pots and plates well before washing. Backpacking stores sell small bottles of 'camping soap'. A squirt of that in a couple of cups of water is enough to wash gear for 2. I then use up to a quart of hot water to rinse things, and wipe them dry.

                      Some campgrounds have large central sinks for washing things, others have 'dry wells' near the camp sites where you can pour soapy water. If none of that is available I just fling the water off into the bushes, or other wise dispose of it in a way that won't get into streams or attract wildlife.

                      1. re: paulj
                        hill food Feb 1, 2013 09:41 PM

                        paulj - I agree, I'd definitely talk to the rangers about how to deal with food and refuse in their park as specific to their critters - and it's what they're there for (yeah among other things, they have always seemed to enjoy talking about 'their' park, and I'd get protective too). the car incident happened a long time ago in the Smokies, back when it was considered "fun" to feed the bears... it was the wilder ones up in the remote Rockies that were content to just root around and scare the $#!+ out of me at night.

                        oh and the dehydrated food? not bad, even tasty, easy clean up, but it WILL repeat on you through the night.

                        yeah I'd check your AMC or other sources for the non-cooking gear advice. (but there's been some good tips offered here)

                        do consider your water supply, those tablets will clean the water, and are good for washing the dishes but taste like crap. and remember if you're foraging from a pond or stream, and there's no plants or algae, the water is probably 'dead' or fouled. healthy water supports life. it may not look pretty but...

                      2. re: sweetfern
                        v
                        VitalForce Feb 2, 2013 11:43 AM

                        I also use the method of using paper towels to wipe down the dishes, etc. before washing using very small amounts of water. It’s fast and doesn’t leave you with the large dirty water disposal problem that bringing along a portable sink would cause.

                        For packing food and kitchen gear, consider soft-sided bags like small-medium duffel bags as they can fit into a smaller car space better than a hard container. Coolers especially can take up a lot of space.

                        Regarding water, it’s readily available in parks. But sometimes there can be a boil-water advisory, and in some areas it can be so heavily treated that it tastes quite bad on its own. So I take one or two large water containers from home for drinking and cooking, and use park water for washing up, unless it tastes good.

                        1. re: VitalForce
                          paulj Feb 2, 2013 12:38 PM

                          I like to have several days worth of drinking water on hand in case there are problems with the campground water supply, or I have to use a less formal setting. I figure on 2 quarts per person per day, for drinking and cooking, with a little extra for washing.

                          I've tried various containers, including 3-6 gallon jugs, and soft side ones. But these days my favorites are the half gallon squarish containers that juices often come in. I freeze several and use those as ice in the cooler, and as a water source when they thaw. They are relatively space efficient, and easily refilled.

              2. m
                mike0989 Jan 31, 2013 11:37 AM

                If you are camping out of a car. I like the two burner stoves that run off of a BBQ bottle like these.

                http://www.costco.com/Camp-Chef-Exped...

                Sooo much better than the white gas or dual fuel stoves. I've cooked a Thanksgiving diner on one of these during a kitchen remodel.

                1 Reply
                1. re: mike0989
                  s
                  sweetfern Jan 31, 2013 11:59 AM

                  I have a lot to consider, here. I am near both REI and EMS.
                  THANK YOU SO MUCH!

                  sweetfern

                2. ted Jan 31, 2013 10:17 AM

                  I'm all white gas or dual fuel. The 2-burner green Coleman is the main one for family car camping. Still have the Coleman Peak stove that my folks got in the early 80's (heck, maybe late 70's). Also a MSR Whisperlite and a Nova Optimus for backpacking (not that I've done any recently).

                  Filling the fuel bottles for any of these is not a big deal and consumption isn't enough that I'd need to take a whole gallon can with me for our typical long-weekend trip.

                  And white gas or dual fuel is a hedge against the zombie apocalypse (I do live in Atlanta, after all). A gallon of white gas lasts a LONG time.

                  1. s
                    soapboxpreacher Jan 30, 2013 08:36 PM

                    Ok I own more Camping stoves then my wife knows of! I have a problem...for I like to cook outdoors and when hiking so I have continued to look for the holy grail of camping stoves. There is however nothing that is of the holy grail of camping stoves. Only what purpose you want them for. If you are car camping with a family your needs are different if you are back packing. So here is what I have found. For Car camping the Camp Chef Everest 2 burner propane is the best! It is fast to heat, easy because of propane, and a lot cleaner and easier to maintain then white gas! However it is more expensive to operate (marginally). Control is excellent! You cannot go better. It his a fantastic stove that can simmer and boil like a good kitchen stove! It also folds up nice and packs down well. I have a Coleman DualFuel 2 burner that I do like it is just harder to controller, takes longer to get up (primed) and is mess when it comes to filling! I like it but the Camp Chef is way better for family car camping! No waiting to get up to flame and it is efficient as well.

                    http://www.campchef.com/everest-2-bur...

                    Now for hiking weight is king and your food is different...most are about freeze dried foods so your stove here will be small and centered around boiling water. Then there is the temperature in which you will be cooking the colder the harder with isobutane it is. Liquid/White Gas work better. I dont camp in these conditions for it is too hard on me! I have a jetboil for boiling water and back packing it runs on an isobutation blend, it is fast efficient and compact. But I could never simmer with it nor would you want to cook something very long on it. Canister style stoves like this have a total burn time around a hour on the small cans. But dehydrating food on the trail is fast and easy...just dont think it will be good...it is ok!

                    Now Alcohol stoves are nice and work in the very cold! However they dont fend well in the wind and dont last long. I have a trangia and like it quite a bit. But it is hard to control and takes some to get use to using. It is cheap and built well but you have to pack fuel like you would with a white gas/liquid fuel stove. It isnt that you have to pack the fuel it is the fuel can spill or leak easier then say isobutane or propane.

                    Finally my most versatile stove is my Primus Omni-Fuel! It does it all. It can use canister fuel, gasoline, kerosene, white gas, isobutane, and more! It is noisy but can simmer pretty good...MSR dragon fly is another that is good!! I like it but it is not something I would use for family camping for it is a single burner just like the jetboil and the trangia. For one maybe two people it would be great for anything from eggs to boiling water! It still has it limited. It is also expensive! But it isnt expensive to operate! White fuel is cheap! And it goes a long way!! Depending on the fuel and how big the bottle is this thing can burn for a long time! I like it but it is also more of a back packing/hiking stove it is does more then just boil water!

                    Overall for family camping....the Camp Chef is stellar!! The other have their niche. The Camp Chef does it all! I like it a lot and it looks good and performs good. It is better then the other Coleman Propanes I have used and seems to be built better as well. It also has a nice stainless inside that makes it easier to clean! You cant go wrong with one!

                    3 Replies
                    1. re: soapboxpreacher
                      hill food Jan 30, 2013 08:44 PM

                      whoa - you ARE hardcore.

                      1. re: soapboxpreacher
                        v
                        VitalForce Jan 31, 2013 06:59 AM

                        The Camp Chef Everest 2 looks like a nice stove, very functional for car camping. I was wondering though if it uses non-refillable canisters or can be filled up? The link below outlines some problems with the non-refillable type.
                        http://www.parkreports.com/parksblog/...

                        1. re: VitalForce
                          m
                          mikie Jan 31, 2013 07:20 AM

                          Per the link below, there are alternatives to dispoasble propane bottles, they just aren't cheap.

                          http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/...

                          This is approximately 1/4 of the normal 20 lb propane tank you have for your gas grill and at just under 5 lbs is considerably more portable and completely refillable, legally. There are adaptors that will allow you to hook this up to portable camping stoves with a short hose.

                      2. The Chowhound Team Jan 30, 2013 10:13 AM

                        Folks, by all means help out sweetfern with advice about camping stoves. Tents, on the other hand are off-topic for Chowhound; sweetfern will have to solicit advice about them elsewhere.

                        1. TraderJoe Jan 30, 2013 09:05 AM

                          I picked up a MSR WindPro II last year. Love it. Compact and great performance. I had to buy something since coleman flaked out and stopped selling Powermax cylinders in the US. ;(
                          I'll add another vote for heading to REI if you have one near you. If your a member don't overlook the closeouts section on the web site for tents. You can score some killer deals there.

                          1. r
                            rasputina Jan 30, 2013 07:11 AM

                            If you will be able to cook over the camp fire you don't need a stove. We have a few different ones including the 2 burner coleman, a backpacking stove and a camp chef. But we only occasionally use them. A grate over coals from the camp fire in a corner of the fire pit works great.

                            1. v
                              VitalForce Jan 30, 2013 05:48 AM

                              I second the Trangia alcohol-burning stoves recommendation. They’re great and very compact. The fuel (which goes under various names, but methyl hydrate in Canada) can be picked up cheaply at any hardware store in the paint section. Some advantages of methyl hydrate are that it’s odourless, burns silently, and doesn’t come in canisters that have to be disposed of after use. But note that with single-burner camping-hiking stoves, the approaches to cooking are very different from the sort of Coleman folding stoves that can be used more like conventional stovetops.

                              As another person has suggested, REI would be a good place to look for tents in your area. EMS is good too. REI has good stoves as well, although not Trangias unfortunately. I have tents made by MSR and Big Agnes, both excellent tents and companies. Someone suggested getting a four-person tent. For two people that would be more comfortable, unless you have to carry it. A useful rule of thumb for tents (unless you’re carrying it) is get one rated for an extra person. Otherwise it can feel constricting because the ratings are for people lying side-by-side with little additional space. So for one person, get a two-person tent. For two people, a three-person tent. For three people, a four-person tent, etc.

                              Paulj’s suggestion of a tarp to be strung up in case of rain is a good one. There are online videos giving ideas on how to set them up. MEC in Canada is a good source for tarps.
                              http://www.mec.ca/AST/ShopMEC/Tents/L...

                              1. bbqboy Jan 29, 2013 02:57 PM

                                I don't like using white gas anymore, or having to carry along a gallon can of the stuff. I use the propane coleman that takes the green cans of propane, available almost anywhere.
                                Check out this combination grill/stove:

                                http://www.coleman.com/product/perfec...

                                You can also find other brands that use the same propane cannisters.

                                13 Replies
                                1. re: bbqboy
                                  g
                                  Gloriaa Jan 29, 2013 03:11 PM

                                  I love these stoves. Very powerful, better than my wolf at home.

                                  1. re: Gloriaa
                                    s
                                    sweetfern Jan 29, 2013 03:58 PM

                                    I am just amazed! Thank you for the ideas!

                                    Anything else you can think of that I might need on a long trip?I'm thinking of L'Anse aux Meadows in Newfoundland. I live in MA, travel frequently to Maine, I would camp there, too.

                                    sweetfern ( comptonia peregrina)

                                    1. re: sweetfern
                                      Sid Post Jan 29, 2013 06:04 PM

                                      I really like my Coleman 2-burner camping stove. Add a 20lb cyclinder, christmas tree and a propane lantern and you have a very sweet setup.

                                      For a tent, a pop-up trailer is nice IF you have a place to store it. A solid 3-season 4 person tent is a nice alternative too. However, a pop-up tent trailer is a lot more comfy then the ground and a lot drier in the rain and a better place to hangout when it's wet.

                                      1. re: sweetfern
                                        paulj Jan 29, 2013 07:06 PM

                                        That's the far NW tip of Newfoundland. I haven't been up there, but have read travel accounts in Labrador, and watched Shipping News. I'd want to be prepared to cold, wind, fog and rain, and bugs.

                                        For sleeping secure from wind, rain and cold, I really like my Element. But when the bugs are out in force, I prefer a stand alone tent. It is easier to keep the bugs out with just one zipped door, than with the big doors of the car.

                                        I also like to rig some sort of tarp over the camp table. And if it is windy, you want a good windscreen on your stove.

                                        Since you are in the Boston area, I'd suggest stopping by an EMS store, and picking the brains of their sales people. In pre-internet days I used to mailorder gear from them.

                                        This Primus 2 burn propane stove would be a good choice. It has a wind screen, 2 burners for cooking flexibility, and a thin profile when closed up.

                                        http://www.ems.com/product/index.jsp?productId=3661767&cp=3677338.11359843.11478400

                                        Once you have an idea of what you want, it's worth checking around for sales prices. SierraTradingPost and REIOutlet have sales items. Campmor (NJ) can have good prices as well, especially on last year's models.

                                        http://www.sierratradingpost.com/prim...
                                        Sierra Trading post - Primus single burner stove with pot, heat exchanger and windscreen.

                                        1. re: sweetfern
                                          bbqboy Jan 29, 2013 07:08 PM

                                          Hey Sweets, if you are headed that way then you need to read Kate's blog. She's been hanging around up there for the past couple of months.

                                          http://www.wanderingnotlost.org/

                                          1. re: bbqboy
                                            s
                                            sweetfern Jan 30, 2013 06:35 AM

                                            Incredible blog, I just checked it out. Thanks.

                                            sf

                                      2. re: bbqboy
                                        paulj Jan 29, 2013 03:51 PM

                                        I try to keep my camping gear compact, ideally one 8 gallon Rubbermaid box for dry goods, one for stove, pots, and utensils, even fuel, and small cooler that fits in the footwell.

                                        White gas, while relatively cheap and powerful, can be messy. The green cans of propane are convenient and a good option for a 2 burner stove. But for a more compact one burner I prefer the isobutane canisters.

                                        1. re: paulj
                                          m
                                          mikie Jan 29, 2013 09:06 PM

                                          my only beef with the propane canisters is they are not environmentally friendly. I would think this would be an issue for a Prius driver.

                                          1. re: mikie
                                            paulj Jan 29, 2013 09:22 PM

                                            You mean, because of the amount of steel? But what's the alternative? Large refillable tanks are nice at home, but would be pain to store in small car, and a pain to move from car to table.

                                            Propane and butane are basically as clean burning as natural gas used in home stoves.

                                            From an eco standpoint, a lot can be said for alcohol which can be burned in a stove made from beer (or pop) cans. And the fuel can be stored in plastic bottles, even recycled water bottles (label them well!). But it's harder do fancy cooking with the simpler stove.

                                            1. re: paulj
                                              m
                                              mikie Jan 30, 2013 10:09 AM

                                              Yes, I just think disposable propane cylinders are a bit wasteful. My back packing days are behind me, but I felt back then that if you care enough about the woods to go back packing you probably also cared enough not to needlesly use disposable cylinders. This was my back pack set up and my son now uses it: http://www.britishblades.com/forums/c... This along with an aluminum refillable fuel bottle is a great set up.

                                              For car camping I have a duel fuel Coleman as Kaleo mentioned above. However I'll admit to having had a Weber portable grill that uses propane canisters, gave it to my appartment dwelling daughter.

                                            2. re: mikie
                                              Sid Post Jan 30, 2013 05:04 AM

                                              For single burner backpacking canister stoves, the "Jetboil" is hard to beat in terms of efficiency.

                                              Being earth friendly, it's hard to beat propane/butane and recycled steel canisters unless you are going to carry a 20lb cylinder you refill yourself.

                                              1. re: Sid Post
                                                juliejulez Jan 30, 2013 09:25 AM

                                                We have a Jetboil (SO uses for hunting) and it's fantastic.

                                                1. re: juliejulez
                                                  deet13 Jan 31, 2013 11:38 PM

                                                  I carry a Jetboil Helios stove in my hunting kit. I can't suggest it enough...

                                                  It's a nice and compact little package.

                                                  As for car camping, I'll always suggest the old Coleman two burner stove. It's inexpensive, easy to repair/maintain, and easy pie to get parts for.

                                        2. a
                                          antennastoheaven Jan 29, 2013 02:40 PM

                                          How elaborate do you plan to be cooking? When we're car camping for a couple of days, we just bring a tiny backpacking stove to do stuff like coffee, scrambles, and chili, and cook everything else over the campfire. The backpacking stove takes up no space and you can set it up pretty much anywhere: http://www.rei.com/product/660163/msr-pocket-rocket-backpacking-stove

                                          For when we'll be out longer and are feeling more elaborate, we'll bring our camp stove (not really in love with the one we have honestly, but will give you link for reference) and our mini-kitchen (we felt silly buying it but it really is great for keeping kitchen stuff organized).
                                          http://www.rei.com/product/820670/primus-profile-2-burner-stove-with-piezo-ignition
                                          http://www.rei.com/product/828504/rei...

                                          1. paulj Jan 29, 2013 02:08 PM

                                            Prius tent:
                                            http://www.greencarreports.com/news/1076328_like-hybrids-like-camping-youll-love-the-prius-tent
                                            With a hatch tent like this, camping in a Prius is nearly as convenient as a boxier Honda Element.

                                            How about a hybrid stove?

                                            There are lots of options in backpacking and sports stores. If the weather isn't too cold, the butane 'hot plate' style of stove work fine. My current favorite is a Swedish made alcohol set - burner, stand and pots
                                            http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.com/2011/11/stove-of-week-trangia-27.html

                                            Or put an 'm' in your 'prius' and get a Primus omnifuel
                                            http://adventuresinstoving.blogspot.c...

                                            1. m
                                              mikie Jan 29, 2013 02:04 PM

                                              Since you mentioned a Prius, I'll assume you're "car camping" not treking through the woods. The Coleman as suggested by Kaleo is a well established piece of standard equipment for cooking for all the people you can get in a Prius. No tailgate is required, just find a flat spot or table and you're ready to start cooking. I would suggest a set of light weight aluminum pots/pans as they transfer the heat quickly and effectively.

                                              Popup tent, not exactly sure what you are refering to, however, agian, Kaleo has brought up a good point. If there are two of you and you are "car camping" not back packing, get a 4 person tent. Unless you know today that this is a one time event, do not scrimp on the tent, buy a good one from a reputable supplier, spend more than you think you should. This is your shelter from the wind, rain, whatever mother nature throws at you. If you buy a cheep tent, it will be your only camping trip, you can almost take that to the bank.

                                              1 Reply
                                              1. re: mikie
                                                hill food Jan 30, 2013 06:32 PM

                                                mikie is right. tent design has progressed so far.

                                                the basic propane Coleman stove can work wonders. it is far more versatile than it appears. we lived for 2 weeks on an endless (god it wouldn't stop!) roadtrip in the 70's with one. I need to dig it back out of the pile, and they last. that and a dutch oven, and if it's in a park you're camping a grill will take you anywhere.

                                              2. p
                                                pedalfaster Jan 29, 2013 01:31 PM

                                                REI.com great customer service and knowledgeble service people. They can set you up with anything from a tiny, light backpacking stove you can cart into the wilderness to a full on multiburner camp kitchen. Ditto on the tent options.

                                                1. k
                                                  kaleokahu Jan 29, 2013 01:15 PM

                                                  Hi, sweetfern:

                                                  "Camping"... As in drive-to-it?

                                                  I think it's hard to beat the ubiquitous green Coleman 2-burner suitcase-style stoves. About $80 in white gas, and $180 in dual-fuel white+unleaded. But. Not. In. The. Prius.

                                                  I'll leave specific tent recs to those who have pop-ups. But my advice is that most "2-person" tents (and some "4-person" ones) are not big/tall enough for 2 people, their gear and dressing.

                                                  Aloha,
                                                  Kaleo

                                                  Show Hidden Posts