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Roasting Chicken for first time - Need help with vegetables

I am roasting a chicken for the first time. It's smallish just under 4 lbs. I want to roast it over brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes. (Does that combination sound alright?) I will be cooking the chicken in a v-shaped rack over the vegetables. Will they cook together at the same time? Do I need to start the chicken and then add the veggies? I was planning on starting with high heat 450 for the first 15 minutes and then dropping down to 375 for the remainder or the time. Any ideas/assistance would be greatly appreciated!

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  1. The sweet potatoes can be added to the pan with the chicken and they will be done when the chicken is done in about 1 hour. I would only add the Brussels sprouts when you lower the temperature because they should only take 40 minutes or so to finish roasting.
    So, potatoes from the beginning, sprouts when you reduce the temperature after 15-20 minutes.

    1. Use a very hot oven (450) for first 15 to 20 minutes, then reduce temp. Your chicken will have seared skin and remain very juicy. Agree to add sprouts later. Check out timing for roast sprouts.

      1. No definitely to the brussel sprouts. Steam them and serve separately from the sweet potatoes. The two veg don't go well together. Yes you can put the chicken on the sweet potatoes. (Sorry everyone but here goes). Preheat the oven to 200 F NO HIGHER! Don't rub anything on the bird. Just a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Put your roasting pan with the bird in it in the oven UNCOVERED!!!! The bird will take a couple of hours at least. Check the internal temp after one hour. Check again every half an hour. The surface of the bird will look undercooked. When the internal temp reaches 155 F crank up the oven to BROIL. Now watch the bird like a hawk. In a couple of minutes the skin on the bird will turn a nice golden brown. Now remove the bird and put a piece of tin foil lightly over the bird. The internal temp. will continue to go up to about 160-165. Rest the bird for at least fifteen-twenty minutes.
        It's hard for some people to go 'low and slow' and have faith in the process. I hope you aren't one of them for the birds sake.
        The photo is a 'low and slow' turkey cooked the way I have described to you.

         
        8 Replies
        1. re: Puffin3

          A couple HOURS for a < 4 lb. chicken? That's slow cooking, for sure, but not for me.
          I've never made a dry bird in far, far less time.
          OP, you can go low and slow or high and much quicker, and neither are high crimes against foul ;-)

          1. re: Puffin3

            Low heat for a long time, that seems like a perfect way to dry the out the bird. The way I recommended is knows as "German" with high heat up front to seal the skin pores.

            1. re: Puffin3

              Cooking a chicken at 200 degrees presents some food safety issues.

              Also the dark meat's connective tissue won't be fully dissolved which is sort of unpleasant.

              1. re: C. Hamster

                http://bigspud.co.uk/2012/02/05/hesto...
                I'm guessing Heston knows what he's doing. I have been roasting chickens and turkeys 'low and slow' for a few years and every one has turned out perfectly cooked 'throughout' (throughout being the operative word). Read Heston's recipe and maybe your concern about food safety and connective tissue may be eased somewhat.

                1. re: Puffin3

                  No, thanks.

                  You may or may not get sick eating a chicken cooked at 200 to a 150 internal but its not worth the risk. And even if you don't get sick, the dark meat will be unpleasant at best.

                  1. re: C. Hamster

                    So IYO what Heston is recommending is potentially dangerous and the "dark meat" will be unpleasant at best? No dark meat on any bird I've ever 'low and slow' roasted has ever tasted "unpleasant" to me or the many many dozens of guests who have eaten it. Maybe when they always compliment me on how moist and delicious the birds are they are just being kind. LOL
                    Did you actually read Heston's piece?

                    1. re: Puffin3

                      Interestingly, if you look at older cookbooks, they will often recommend cooking chicken only to the point where the meat is pink around the bones. There is a risk of salmonella, listeria, etc., but it is only a risk, not an absolute.

            2. The sweet potatoes and sprouts certainly can co-mingle as they cook under the chicken. The chicken's juices will make them delicious.
              Brussel and sweet potato hash is a winner too, so maybe an idea for any leftovers.

              1. Sounds good and a good choice of veggies. Check your bird with a probe thermometer take out at 165-170 tent and let it rest for 15 min+/-.

                1. I spray my roasting rack with non-stick (Crisco is my favorite) spray so the bird releases easily when done. Nothing like tearing that gorgeous brown skin at the end ;-(

                  1. Question: Wouldn't you be cooking the vegetables in the chicken fat? I prefer my vegetables to be low fat, is this a consideration?

                    7 Replies
                    1. re: Ruthie789

                      Yes, the potatoes and sprouts would be cooking in the chicken's fat drippings, unless you put the veggies on a baking rack placed directly on the bottom of the pan. Then, they'd be roasting above the dripping, but still would get dripped on, if that matters.

                      1. re: monavano

                        I am not criticizing, I am just wondering if the op wants to have the fat with the vegetables. I like my vegetables roasted at the same time as the chicken but separately in a different pan, usually put them in parchment paper bag.

                        1. re: Ruthie789

                          Oh, no criticism sensed! Your method is definitely saving on fat and calories.

                      2. re: Ruthie789

                        The vegetables are delicious this way, but, sadly, no longer low fat. Try it sometime, however. I do this with a clay cooker and the vegetables are wonderful.

                        1. re: law_doc89

                          My Mom used to roast the potatoes in with the pork roast, they were delicious as I recall, so am sure are very tasty with the chicken.

                        2. re: Ruthie789

                          chicken fat is naturally high in oleic acid, so it actually helps flush some of the junk from your arteries.

                          And once you taste those veggies roasted in the chicken drippings (which, let's be honest -- includes other liquid besides fat) -- you won't care, anyway.

                          1. re: sunshine842

                            No need to convince me that they must be delicious but fat is not something that I can eat much of, including olive oil due to health problems.

                        3. Hmmm. just replied to this but post never showed up. I love questions like this. I say play safe for this meal but keep doing your own experiments if you can. I recently accidentally overdid the sprouts, they caramelised and the result was awesome (luckily!) Go to it!

                          1. I always find cooking times and heat an interesting discussion. Mine are rarely what I see others state. I cook alot of chickens. 3 or for a month, sometimes more. always at 375 for almost 2 hours.

                            Prehaet oven to 375. Fine chop one quarter yellow onion, one small carrot, half a rib of celery, a handful of sliced cherry tomatoes, several cloves of garlic and add them to a large bowl. Pour in a good glug, glug, glug of olive oil. Add a pinch of rosemary, thyme and sage. Go for a four finger blast of salt and goodly amount of black pepper. Mix it all together. Put the bird in the bowl and roll it around and massage and rub in the spices. Take the bird out, put it in a dutch oven and pour the onion mixture over the top. I try to leave some of the skin uncovered so it crisps up. Do not put a lid on the dutch oven. Place chicken int eh oven and cook for 1 and 3/4 to 2 hours. I wiggle the wing tip to check for doneness, when it's loose it's ready.

                            I like to take the bird out of the dutch oven and put it on a platter so I can make gravy from the drippings. It is so tasty with all those aromatics. Yum!

                            I've never been able to get a chicken cooked in one hour.

                            Can't really comment on the sweet potatoes as I'm not a fan, but I would saute the brussel sprouts seperately. I some times cook potatoes in the same dutch oven as the chicken.
                            jb

                            1. I can't tell you anything more or better than what you've gotten already, but here's a neat trick: roast a bulb of garlic inside the chicken. When it's resting, spread the garlic on good bread or bruschetta, and there's your first course. I also like to roast 1/2 lemon per person to squeeze over the chicken portions.

                              1 Reply
                              1. re: mamachef

                                I occasionally put garlic (unpeeled) in the chicken, but never thought to check out how it cooked and spread it on bread. Great idea. Will check it out next time.

                              2. I don;t like the idea of cooking Brussels sprouts and sweet potatoes in chicken fat. White potatoes, yes. Cooks Illustrated has a good recipe for roasting a spatchcocked chicken on a broiling rack, with chunks of peeled potato beneath.

                                I have made and liked one of their TV show recipes thar aired recently, and where you are new to roasting chicken, this may be a better approach for you. You dismantle the bird and will be using only the breast halves (bone in), thighs, and legs. Reserve wings, back, and giblets for stockmaking. Chop peeled potatoes and carrots into 1"-ish chunks. About 12 ounces of each. Peel a few shallots. Trim the bottoms of 12 oz of Brussels sprouts. Toss the veg in olive oil. Spread on a sheet pan, salt and pepper to taste. Put the Brussels sprouts in the center of the pan. Nestle the breast pieces, skin side up, among them. Nestle the legs and thighs midway from middle to edge of the pan, evenly spaced. Baste the chicken with melted butter, sprinkle with S&P and your choice of herbs. Place in a preheated 475F oven for 45 min. Done. No turning needed. The placement of the breasts and sprouts is so they get somewhat less heat than the rest.

                                For roasting a whole bird, I prefer to scatter roughly cut carrot, onion, and celery in the bottom of the pan, along with the giblets. They make the drippings a delicious base for gravy-making.

                                3 Replies
                                1. re: greygarious

                                  Not sure cutting up a chicken is 'officially' "roasting A chicken". That's what the thread was about. 'Roasting chicken' is different.
                                  Anyway, you can certainly 'roast' cut up chicken parts in a screaming hot 450 F oven for 45 minutes if you wish. And you won't need to go to the trouble of 'turning' the chicken parts I'm sure. The picture of a chicken breast that has had that done to it can be left to other's imagination here.
                                  Another idea would be the 'low and slow' method: Preheat the oven to 200 F NO HIGHER! Don't rub anything on the bird. Don't 'truss' it. Stick a couple of lemon halves and a sprig of a fresh herd you like in the cavity. Just a sprinkle of salt and pepper. Why add any oil/butter to the skin if you want it to be crispy right? Put your roasting pan with the bird in it in the oven UNCOVERED!!!! The bird will take a couple of hours at least. Check the internal temp after one hour. Check again every half an hour. At this point the internal temp can rise quickly. so watch it carefully. The surface of the bird will look pale and undercooked. When the internal temp reaches about 155 F crank up the oven to BROIL. Now watch the bird like a hawk. In a couple of minutes the skin on the bird will turn a nice golden brown. Now remove the bird and put a piece of tin foil lightly over the bird. The carry-over internal temp. will continue to go up to about 160-165. Rest the bird for at least fifteen-twenty minutes.
                                  It's hard for some people to go 'low and slow' and have faith in the process. I hope you aren't one of them for the birds sake.
                                  Trust me. Once you start cooking/roasting any form of protein this way you will never again go back to temperatures that essentially turn the exterior of a bird/roast into leather and an interior that's somewhere around medium and the meat on the bones rare. That is not the result an expert processional or home cook wants. It's known as 'uneven cooking' and ironically it's this outdated method that is responsible for many cases of food poisoning.
                                  Hence the reasoning behind the 'SV' cooking method which is fundamentally changing the way food is cooked all over the planet.
                                  http://bigspud.co.uk/2012/02/05/hesto...

                                  1. re: Puffin3

                                    I think you are being overly dogmatic. There are enough chicken threads on this board to demonstrate that a wide variety of methods have their adherents. There's more than one way to accomplish many a dish with comparable results.
                                    Yes, we tend to call dry heat oven-cooking of chicken pieces baking, and a whole bird roasting. But when it comes to chunks of oiled vegetables it's called roasting. I'll make the argument that the chicken leg next to the carrot and potato chunk is also being roasted. In the ATK or CC recipe, the chicken pieces are not overcooked. They benefit from the moisture coming off the vegetables, and the center placement of the breasts.

                                    In this thread alone, you have repeatedly posted the same info and links. Clearly you are very certain that yours is the only correct method. Chowhound is about sharing expertise and results. The OP will be the one to choose a method.

                                    1. re: greygarious

                                      At this point I am wondering if the op has made the chicken and if so how it was done including the vegetables!

                                2. whatever way you choose to roast the chicken, I like to set the chicken on a dish uncovered in the refridgerator overnight. That way it dries out and the skin crisps up easily.