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Roasting pan help--Mauviel options and alternatives?

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pkhemmerich Jan 20, 2013 09:07 PM

I've gone a long time (12 years) without a good roasting pan, leaving me looking for some options.

I know copper is a great conductor of heat and distributes it more evenly than any other metal, but the cost is intimidating. I know copper pans and pots are certainly worth it, but are roasting pans as well?

Also, I've been shopping some Mauviel roasting pans, and based on their descriptions if anyone has any helpful feedback?

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/mauviel-mheritage-150b/copper-roasting-pan-rack-p126630

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/mauviel-mheritage-150b/copper-roaster-p113868

http://www.cutleryandmore.com/mauviel...

  1. g
    GH1618 Jan 20, 2013 09:24 PM

    The thermal conductivity of the metal is not important in a roasting pan, because the pan is surrounded by heated air which is confined in the oven.

    I use a de Buyer Mineral roasting pan.

    3 Replies
    1. re: GH1618
      p
      pkhemmerich Jan 21, 2013 03:01 PM

      But what about on the stove when making sauces from the dripping and fond?

      1. re: pkhemmerich
        g
        GH1618 Jan 21, 2013 08:53 PM

        There, the importance is minor, I think. The fast respone of copper is useful when making a delicate sauce on the stovetop which is easily scorched, but I don't think this applies to the type of sauce one makes in a roasting pan.

        I haven't tried making sauce in my large steel roasting pan, however. It seems a little cumbersome for that. It would have hot spots where the burners are — I don't know if it would matter. I scrape the fond into a cast iron skillet when I want to work with it. Unconventional, I suppose.

        1. re: pkhemmerich
          TraderJoe Jan 22, 2013 02:21 AM

          "But what about on the stove when making sauces from the dripping and fond?"

          The gain from copper here is still nominal. It's not like you can't deglaze and transer to another pan which is a wise move.

      2. TraderJoe Jan 21, 2013 06:27 AM

        IMO copper roasting pans are over kill and other than looking cool don't offer a lot of benefit. The Mauviel SS is very nice but it is still a bit expensive for a roaster that size.

        1 Reply
        1. re: TraderJoe
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          pkhemmerich Jan 21, 2013 03:05 PM

          I wouldn't mind spending that on a once-in-a-lifetime expense, but it's only 1.6mm thick, which just doesn't seem sturdy enough at that price range.

        2. kaleokahu Jan 21, 2013 08:05 AM

          Hi, pk:

          Worth it? Only you can decide.

          If your roasting is limited to preparations that go from counter to oven to plate, the metal doesn't--much--matter. But if you also want to sear in the pan prior to the roast, or you wish to make integral sauces or gravies in the pan, then copper has an advantage because the pan can straddle two hobs and still be relatively even.

          I would JUMP on the first link you posted--they misdescribe this M150 as being 2.5mm thick, and so you might hold them to shipping you a M250.

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

          12 Replies
          1. re: kaleokahu
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            pkhemmerich Jan 21, 2013 02:45 PM

            Thanks Kaleo,

            I noticed that one described as 2.5mm (which is what I want), but it also has an aluminum core, which is why it might be that price and 2.5mm thick. I know aluminum is a great conductor of heat as well, but not so great of a cooking surface.

            Any feedback on that?

            Thanks,
            pk

            1. re: pkhemmerich
              kaleokahu Jan 21, 2013 07:54 PM

              Hi, pk:

              Sorry, I missed that #1 has an aluminum core. News to me that Mauviel is puting Al inside its copper.

              I'm sure #1 is a good pan (and better than ##2 & 3), just not sure what the value is. Or how much copper is there. At 2.5 mm, if Mauviel is using its usual 0.2mm lining, that leaves just 2.3mm for both the copper and the Al core. Many makers use 2mm cores, and if that's the case here, there isn't much copper. Strangely, there is no weight given.

              If you look closely at #2, you'll see that the walls are so thin (only 1.2mm of copper) the rivets actually deformed the walls in the assembly. A big roast in this pan would further bend it, and you might eventually loosen the handles.

              Have you considered a vintage pan? Thick copper roasters come up on eBay all the time. I found myself a 3mm tinned roaster for $185 that's in great shape. There's one listed right now AAMOF: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Leon-Jaeggi-L... Jaeggi is sort of London's equivalent of Dehillerin, coming up on its 100th birthday.

              Another idea is a larger oval gratin. These work great for all but the largest roasts and could save you some $$.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              1. re: kaleokahu
                p
                pkhemmerich Jan 21, 2013 08:13 PM

                I have certainly considered vintage. I'm a big fan of reusing and reusing some more. There's something to be said about a piece that's lasted many years and is still just as good at its job as the day it was first put to work.

                I saw this one http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mauviel-Copper-Roaster-Pan-w-lift-Roasting-France-Downton-Abbey-/271116781544?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3f1fd1c7e8 online and wasn't sure it 2mm was enough body. I think I'm also leaning toward a SS interior coating.

                Also on my mind are http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=181066597689&fromMakeTrack=true&ssPageName=VIP:watchlink:top:en and http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Large..., but I don't know how the weight relates to copper width.

                1. re: pkhemmerich
                  kaleokahu Jan 21, 2013 10:09 PM

                  Hi, pk:

                  All three are nice pans. I think the 3mm Jaeggi wins for me, though. The smaller tin-lined one you just linked to is a GREAT size. People tend to buy larger roasters than they need.

                  Tin vs. SS... Is your concern with tin melting, or wearing through? Neither is a huge concern in this application IMO. But if you don't like the look of dark tin, that's a deciding factor

                  Aloha,
                  Kaleo

                  1. re: kaleokahu
                    p
                    pkhemmerich Jan 22, 2013 05:07 AM

                    Ya, Kaleo, what you mentioned about tin is my concern, mostly because I live in New York City and I have to have pieces that can perform multiple functions, so that means I'm going to be throwing it under a broiler sometimes and possibly putting it over very high heat.

                    I've read many places that the concerns over tin are a little exaggerated, but for me and my current situation, I think those concerns might be worth taking into account.

                    1. re: kaleokahu
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                      pkhemmerich Jan 22, 2013 05:45 AM

                      Kaleo,

                      Any input on http://brooklyncoppercookware.com/sto... ?

                      Thanks,
                      pk

                      1. re: pkhemmerich
                        kaleokahu Jan 22, 2013 06:54 AM

                        Hi, pk:

                        The Brooklyn stuff is quite nice, and the owners are great. I've had them repair and improve a complicated vessel that no one else would touch. They can do it all, from basic retinning to casting custom handles, to reaching deep into the vaults to recreate the entire catalog of Waldow. The Hammersmith side of the shop does the castings that keep the NYC subway historically accurate--serious metalwork.

                        They don't do bimetal, but they do offer a 1-time free retinning on every piece sold.

                        Aloha,
                        Kaleo

                        1. re: pkhemmerich
                          kaleokahu Jan 22, 2013 07:07 AM

                          Hi, l_d:

                          Your pan sounds great. I would have no problem whatsoever using it. But alas, we have been conditioned to fear/suspect/avoid aluminum. Post a photo?

                          It's also a great thickness for straddling two hobs. My point above concerning the deglaze had nothing to do with whether the liquor stays in the roaster, but rather the evenness of the heat *during* the deglaze and/or an earlier sear.

                          Aloha,
                          Kaleo

                  2. re: pkhemmerich
                    TraderJoe Jan 22, 2013 02:45 AM

                    "I noticed that one described as 2.5mm (which is what I want), but it also has an aluminum core"

                    The m150b roaster is indeed listed by Mauviel as 2.5mm tri-ply.

                    1. re: TraderJoe
                      p
                      pkhemmerich Jan 22, 2013 05:08 AM

                      TraderJoe,

                      Any input on the aluminum core? As far as I'm concerned, 2.5mm is a sturdy roasting pan and ideally I wouldn't be forced to go under that, but what is the longevity like? Performance? Any input?

                      Thanks,
                      pk

                      1. re: pkhemmerich
                        TraderJoe Jan 22, 2013 05:22 AM

                        Tri-ply copper in a roaster seems counter intuitive to me. I really think you could spend less than $100 on a SS roaster and have a better product.

                        1. re: TraderJoe
                          p
                          pkhemmerich Jan 22, 2013 05:38 AM

                          Good to know. I appreciate your input.

                2. Robin Joy Jan 22, 2013 12:16 AM

                  Enamelled CI works a treat:

                  http://www.nisbets.co.uk/Orange-Rectangular-Dish/W477/ProductDetail.raction

                  That's about $50.

                  Or aluminium:

                  http://www.nisbets.co.uk/Vogue-Non-St...

                  Both fine on a cooktop for searing or sauce making.

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: Robin Joy
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                    pkhemmerich Jan 22, 2013 05:11 AM

                    I thought about enameled CI, but that's even heavier than copper and ss. Not to mention CI retains heat much longer, leaving anything left in the pan to continue cooking at a greater rate than other materials.

                    I have some enameled CI stuff, but I use those for specific cooking.

                    1. re: Robin Joy
                      law_doc89 Jan 22, 2013 06:53 AM

                      Thanks for the links

                    2. law_doc89 Jan 22, 2013 06:33 AM

                      30 years ago I was given a 18 X 13 aluminum roasting pan, almost 1/4 inch thick. It is a work horse. It deglazes perfectly and nothing sticks to it.

                      Copper is a pain to clean, and I doubt the cost is worth any gain.

                      I endorse transferring the deglaze to a sauce pot.

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