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CCK KF1912 Review (Small Chinese stainless steel slicer)

Chemicalkinetics Jan 16, 2013 08:40 PM

This is a review of the stainless steel CCK small Chinese slicer: KF1912.
The CCK carbon steel knives are well known through numerous internet knife forums and words of mouth. Yet, the stainless steel version of CCK knives are rarely discussed. Paulustrious probably is the only person I have heard talking about his CCK stainless steel knife.

http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/6796...

I purchased the CCK KF1912 thin blade Chinese slicer for my friend. The KF1912 slicer ($50 CAD) is essentially the stainless steel version of the famous carbon steel KF1303 slicer (see photo 1 and 2 for direct comparison). The factory edge was fine, but it could use a bit more touch up, so I put on a 10° back bevel on each side of the blade, and then a 15° edge bevel. The KF1912 stainless steel slicer was able to take on an edge sharp enough to shave hair, push cut paper, cut through phone book in one stroke (photo 3). (The knife was sharpened using Benton 1000 grit, Naniwa Super 2000, Naniwa Super 5000 and stropped on a leather belt).

Although I have been using it for almost 3 weeks, the knife probably saw 1.5 week-worth of my normal kitchen work due to my recent busy schedule. After three weeks, the cutting edge is still sharp enough to push cut paper. I feel the edge may not have held up quiet as nicely as the carbon steel KF1303, but the marginally difference is too difficult to tell for sure. This stainless steel is unequivocably better than Dexter-Russell blades in this regard. In short, I am pleasantly surprised by the quality of this unknown stainless steel blade.

For dimension comparison,
KF1912 (stainless steel) is 20.5 cm blade length, 9 cm blade width, 1.5 mm thick at the spine tip, 2.3 mm at the spine heel, and weights 283 g.
KF1303 (carbon steel) is 20.5 cm blade length, 9 cm blade width, 1.2 mm thick at the spine tip, 2.7 mm at the spine heel, and weights 273 g
Thanks.

 
 
 
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  1. BiscuitBoy RE: Chemicalkinetics Jan 17, 2013 07:45 AM

    Back bevel using stones? That's one helluva straight line for handwork, Chem. I like the phonebook trick too.

    1 Reply
    1. re: BiscuitBoy
      Chemicalkinetics RE: BiscuitBoy Jan 17, 2013 12:22 PM

      It isn't too bad at all for sharpening because the blade is very thin. It is thinner than any gyuto I have seen.

    2. j
      JavaBean RE: Chemicalkinetics Jan 17, 2013 11:11 AM

      Great job on the review and knife work. Those big bevels look really even and shiny. Any issues with food sticking?

      Kinda surprised the CCK stainless performs better than the Dexter.

      5 Replies
      1. re: JavaBean
        Chemicalkinetics RE: JavaBean Jan 17, 2013 12:27 PM

        <Any issues with food sticking? >

        Yeah, there are definitely food sticking, but I don't think it is really bad, not worse than typical wide blade knives anyway.

        <Kinda surprised the CCK stainless performs better than the Dexter>

        I guess it depends what we are looking for. The 420-ish (either 420 or 420 HC) from Dexter Russell is good, but they are softer than the CCK stainless steel. I have a few Dexter knives (3-4) and they are easy to sharpen, very easy to find the burr, and can in fact take on a resonable good edge. I also have no doubt that they are easy to hone with a honing steel. The problem I noticed is that Dexter steel doesn't hold the edge as long as some other knives, like this CCK stainless steel knife. Usually speaking, my Dexter Russell knives lose its paper push cutting edge (or arm shaving edge) after about 1 week worth of food preparation.

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
          j
          JavaBean RE: Chemicalkinetics Jan 18, 2013 06:22 AM

          I was hoping you had a work around.  I've been keeping the high polish area on my wide, flat ground blades to under 1/2".  I notice cucumbers, potatoes, etc. don't stick as much as with a wider area.

          Yeah, edge retention on the dexter is not very good, but haven't come across anything better in its' price class. Most of Asian stainless steel cleavers that i've sharpened, didn't take or hold an edge better.  It's good to know the cck stainless is a better alternative.  

          1. re: JavaBean
            Chemicalkinetics RE: JavaBean Jan 18, 2013 08:25 AM

            <Most of Asian stainless steel cleavers that i've sharpened, didn't take or hold an edge better>

            Oh yeah, I agree. Most of the Chinese made stainless steel blades are softer than Dexter-Russell, and last shorter. I think that may have been why I was surprised that the CCK stainless steel held up its edge nicely. I like Dexter-Russell.

          2. re: Chemicalkinetics
            TraderJoe RE: Chemicalkinetics Jan 18, 2013 06:29 AM

            "my Dexter Russell knives lose its paper push cutting edge (or arm shaving edge) after about 1 week worth of food preparation"

            That's not all that bad for run of the mill SS but I'm a bit surprised as my Dexter Cleaver holds an edge a good bit longer than that.
            Nice review Chem. The CCK's are hard to beat when considering price point Vs value.

            1. re: TraderJoe
              Chemicalkinetics RE: TraderJoe Jan 18, 2013 08:31 AM

              <but I'm a bit surprised as my Dexter Cleaver holds an edge a good bit longer than that.>

              I think it may be a difference of how we use our knives or maybe how we define losing an edge. After about a week of using my Dexter Russell Chinese Chef's knife (or cleaver), it would still cut food fine, but if I tried to shave my arm hair or push cut paper, I would notice a noticable "resistance". In contrast, my Japanese Aogami knife (Watanabe) would have no problem performing these tasks after 1 week.

              So I guess what I am saying is that I don't need to resharpen my Dexter Russell knives every week, but the edge starts to show its deterioration.

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