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I’m in 7th Grade and Looking for Ideas for an Authentic Japanese Dish for a School Project

Hey, chowhounds! I’m doing a school project for my seventh grade history class. I need an authentic and traditional Japanese recipe. I want it to be something that is not common, to be different than everybody else. It should probably photograph well, since I need to take pictures along the way. I don’t have to serve it to my class, so it doesn’t need to taste good to 7th graders. I would love some ideas. Please respond quickly, because my deadline is approaching.

Thank you! ☺

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  1. Do you have to actually bring the food, or just the pictures?

    1 Reply
    1. I did something very similar in 9th grade :) We made a full japanese dinner for an English class. It was a awhile back and it was a group thing so I don't remember all of the dishes that our group made, but the one dish I do recall was miso soup. It's very easy to make and should photograph well, especially if it's in a white bowl. Here's a good recipe: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/al...

      Also since that doesn't have a photo, here's a recipe with a photo: http://www.cookstr.com/recipes/lemony...

      1. FYI, this is my daughter's post -- and she's super excited for her first Chowhound post!

        For perspective, there are a bunch of Asian kids in her class (mostly Korean), so the usual suspects will probably be taken (so no sushi or teriyaki). We live in L.A., so have access to good Asian markets, but no experience with making Japanese food. I was thinking of the rolled omelet (forgetting the name at the moment), as it would have good presentation value and photos along the way, but have never made, so please bring on additional ideas.

        Thank you in advance for helping my Chowpup along to success!

        1 Reply
        1. re: mebby

          There is a nice how-to video for making this omelette on the Just One Cookbook website:
          http://justonecookbook.com/blog/recip...

          There are so many good ideas here already...if your daughter is having a hard time picking just one recipe, it migh help for her to look at photos & decide what she'd like to try. Just One Cookbook and Just Bento have beautifl photos.

        2. The original comment has been removed
          1. i am 11 and i am in seventh grade and my mom is really strict about this kind of thing. i really wanted to have my own chowhound account anyway.

            1. re: Indium

              Welcome to Chowhound! I found a really cool idea - are you familiar with Doraemon? You can check it out on Wikipedia - and have your mom okay it first - it's an iconic manga which should be completely appropriate for 7th grade. And the reason I bring it up - I found a recipe for Dorayaki, which is Doraemon's favorite food!

              http://justhungry.com/recipe-dorayaki...

              If you tie the manga in with the presentation, yours will most likely be the favorite of the entire class.

              Good luck & I'd love to see the photo series when you're done!

              1. re: Indium

                FYI, this was in reply to someone who questioned whether she was really 11 or whether or her mom was doing her homework for her -- apparently got flagged and deleted.

            2. Indium,

              You might consider oden soup. Oden is a traditional Japanese winter soup of dashi (a type of broth) and a variety of fish cakes and other inclusions. Because of the variety of fairly large ingredients, it's a very visually appealing dish, and it would be very traditionally served at this time of year, commonly from little street vendors and tiny shops.

              A quick Google search will turn up plenty of pictures and recipes.

              1 Reply
              1. re: Booklegger451

                I second this idea. There was just an article in my paper about oden and I made it over new years. Easy and delicious. Make the shrimp balls - they are fun.

                http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/a...