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Sweet, airy, yeasty bread

When I was growing up my friend's mother made this sweet, airy, yeasty bread. It was so good. It had giant air bubbles in it so when you sliced the bread it had great divets for collecting jam or whatever you wanted to spread on it. It was very delicate and light and airy and was slightly sweet.

I have no idea what type of bread it is, and I have never made bread myself, but I would like to try to make some myself. I know she used a starter, but that's about all.

Anyone have some recipes that may be a match? Also, beginner bread tips may be helpful. I do not have a bread machine but I do have a mixer with dough hook attachment.

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  1. brioche? challa?

    1 Reply
    1. re: marissaj

      Challah definitely looked too "solid".

      Brioche...maybe....most of the google pics I saw were of round rolls. She made hers in a regular loaf pan. I also think most of the ones I saw were too uniformly dark brown on top. Hers seemed lighter. Plus I remember hers being very delicate, like you couldn't make a good solid sandwich with it. Its hard to tell from the pics if that is the case with brioche. But I am remembering through a child's eyes....so brioche may be it.

    2. When you say she used a starter, that makes me think sourdough. I googled & found someone with a recipe for sweet sourdough, including how to make the starter, here (I have not tried this so can't vouch for it) http://melissaringstaff.com/2009/03/0...

      You did say "yeasty" bread, though, so that may be the wrong track.

      1 Reply
      1. re: eepi

        Oh I just thought of a better description....it is like a store bought donut (not the cake donut kind). Like a Dunkin Donuts or Krispy Kreme regular glazed donut. The bread had texture kinda like that. Definitely a little more solid than that, so it could be a loaf bread, but not by much...

      2. Portuguese sweet bread aka easter bread?

        7 Replies
        1. re: foodieX2

          Hmmm....maybe easter bread. It is hard to tell with all those eggs in the pictures! Seriously, it still seems "lighter" than those shown, and it is a real thin, soft crust...more like store bought white bread than like sourdough or french.

          Maybe I just need to try a few and see. Brioche and Easter bread are the twop two contenders right now.

          1. re: yddeyma

            Portuguese sweet bread has a very thin, soft and often shiny crust. The bread itself is very light and airy and toasts beautifully. It has the taste of brioche but unlike brioche it often doesn't make great french toast because even when stale it get mushy quickly, being that it is so tender.

            1. re: foodieX2

              Does it use a starter and do you have a recipe?

              1. re: yddeyma

                My recipe is from my grandmother and I am on the road.

                I googled and this seems really darn close! My gram was from the azores too. The photo doesn't do the bread justice tho, The bread looks much different,

                http://www.npr.org/2012/12/13/1671514...

              2. re: foodieX2

                I think we may have a winner. The picture of a slide of the easter bread here: http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/2320..., looks almost exactly like it. She doesn't put it in a fancy pan or dust it with sugar, but the inside of that bread is almost a perfect match.

                I glanced over this webpage and wasn't sure what the person was talking about all the time (100% starter....50% starter...etc.) so I may need to hunt around for a recipe.

                1. re: yddeyma

                  yeah! let us know how it turns out!

              3. re: yddeyma

                I found a cool article that will probably be useful as you experiment with your breadmaking - the author talks about what makes those air-bubble divots happen. http://www.culinate.com/columns/ask_h...

            2. Here is a link to a recipe that has a description which sounds similar to the bread that your friend's mother made. I think it sounds great and will probably try it this week.

              http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipe...