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Boston Market Removed Salt Shakers from Tables: Your Thought?

Chemicalkinetics Jan 3, 2013 10:21 PM

This is not a recent news, but I think it is worth a discussion. Boston Market has removed salt shakers from the diners' tables. Diners who wish to add salt can get the shakers next to the soda dispensers and condiment stations. Basically, just to be make it slightly more difficult to use the salt shakers, but not impossible. It will also decrease the salt by 20% for three of its popular dishes.

"The rotisserie chicken chain, best-known for its spinning chicken rotisseries and its tasty but often-salty side dishes, is announcing plans today to remove salt shakers from guest tables at all 476 locations."

I found this out last year when I decided to visit one after a long absence -- since college.

So what do you think of the salt shaker removal? Some people like it. Others think this is unnecessary.

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/boston...

  1. a
    aynrandgirl May 15, 2013 09:50 AM

    Certainly not an endearing move, just like their dropping ham from their regular menu (I loved the ham sandwiches).

    1. g
      GH1618 Jan 9, 2013 07:45 PM

      Since I never add salt (which is the cook's job, in my opinion), it wouldn't bother me a bit. What I object to is that a certain cafeteria I use occasionally removed the pepper shakers and replaced them with little paper packets at a common table.

      1. m
        mugen Jan 9, 2013 03:40 PM

        You're the researcher: you tell us!

        My understanding is that salt, like fat, has entered conventional medical and popular wisdom as malum per se, without there ever having been sufficient evidence to establish the connection between salt, hypertension, and cardio-vascular disease: the studies are inconsistent and those that report a relationship show only a weak one.

        2 Replies
        1. re: mugen
          carolinadawg Jan 9, 2013 07:27 PM

          My "understanding" is very different from yours. But that's a discussion that is very off topic for this site.

          1. re: carolinadawg
            m
            mugen Jan 9, 2013 08:55 PM

            Whether salt is deleterious or not is kinda essential to the topic, because if it isn't, then whether or not Boston Market is acting paternalistically is secondary to the fact that it is acting misguidedly in any case.

            Anyhow, I take no position on salt other than as the evidence shows, so I'm open to correction. I cite, by way of example, a meta-study in the American Journal of Hypertension that examined ~170 randomised trials and concluded:

            Due to the relatively small effects and due to the antagonistic nature of the effects (decrease in BP, increase in hormones and lipids), these results do not support that sodium reduction may have net beneficial effects in a population of Caucasians. In Caucasians with elevated BP, short-term sodium reduction decreases BP by ~2–2.5%, indicating that sodium reduction may be used as a supplementary treatment for hypertension. In Asians and blacks, the effect of sodium reduction was greater, but at present too few studies have been carried out to conclude different from that above.

            http://www.nature.com/ajh/journal/v25...

        2. a
          aynrandgirl Jan 8, 2013 04:39 PM

          Almost as annoying as when they stopped serving ham sandwiches.

          1. greygarious Jan 4, 2013 12:17 PM

            Good for them! I don't really care whether their motives are altruistic or economic. I wish that were the case in all fast and casual dining places. It particularly irks me that french fries are automatically salted. I don't indulge often but when I do, I ask to have them portion mine before they salt the latest dumped from the fryalator. This usually slows up the line at the register. They'd save a little on their salt expense if they did not presalt fries. Drive-thrus don't all put ketchup in the bag unless requested to; they could apply the same policy to salt (and pepper) too. They all have a diet soda option but I wish they offerred decaf diet cola too.

            1 Reply
            1. re: greygarious
              sunshine842 Jan 4, 2013 03:35 PM

              ah, but you also get steaming-hot fries, which is not a bad thing....

              Quick, a large burger chain in Europe, doesn't pre-salt their fries -- but truthfully? Everything on their menu pretty much sucks, and so do their fries.

            2. jrvedivici Jan 4, 2013 08:40 AM

              Its topics like these that after reading through the responses just leave me scratching my head. All fast food is saturated in salt / sodium. If you are overly concerned about your daily intake you should stay clear of all of these type establishments. (Yes I know it’s rotisserie chicken and “assumed” to be healthier for you but guess what…..that guise wore off when Mc Donalds bought the company)

              They are removing salt from the tables….yes that’s a good thing period. It makes sense from a business standpoint on some form of savings…..it makes sense from a health stand point as well. There is NO angle in which this doesn't just plain and simple make sense. If you want it get up and get it with your drink, napkin or other condiment, even if it’s one of the locations where they serve you, no big deal.

              36 Replies
              1. re: jrvedivici
                Chemicalkinetics Jan 4, 2013 09:09 AM

                <There is NO angle in which this doesn't just plain and simple make sense>

                My friend thinks it does impose some moral value on people which he believes Boston Market is not in a position to do so. It imposes an idea that "You shouldn't use salt, but if you really want to, well you have to get up, walk over here, and get it"

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                  jrvedivici Jan 4, 2013 09:43 AM

                  No offense to your friend but as explained above it's not fine dining....it's "Healthy" fast food. (Obviously healthy is a cautious use of the word)

                  Salt/Sodium = Bad. I applaud the corporate stand point of trying to make it a little less easy for people to make bad choices for themselves. Personally though I do believe it is more a cost savings standpoint than true health choice on Boston Markets side......but again nobody is saying you can't have your salt. If you want to have your salt on your table and your pepper fresh from a pepper mill, don't go to Boston Market !!!

                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                    Boston_Otter Jan 9, 2013 08:18 AM

                    Your friend has some very bizarre ideas about morality.

                    There's nothing about removing saltshakers from tables and putting them in an area where you can pick one up yourself, if needed, that has anything to do with "imposing moral values". At all.

                    Is it "imposing moral values" to make me pick up a bottle of hot sauce from the condiment area at Chipotle rather than have them on the table?

                    1. re: Boston_Otter
                      Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 08:46 AM

                      < that has anything to do with "imposing moral values". At all.>

                      It does impose a statement that "You should use less salt" afterall Boston Market itself claims that is their motives.

                      Here, we have people who like this idea, and people who don't. For the record, I like this idea. Many people like it because this can potentially reduce the salt intake for the patrons, which we also believe excessive salt is bad. But we like it because this in fact is imposing a value.

                      "By removing salt shakers from Boston Market tables, we hope to raise awareness of salt intake, without completely eliminating the option, to those who dine in our restaurants," Boston Market CEO George Michel said in the statement. "Today, we are publicly committing to further reduce sodium from menu items while still delivering the great taste for which Boston Market is known."

                      <to make me pick up a bottle of hot sauce from the condiment area at Chipotle rather than have them on the table?>

                      Depending why Chipotle does it, right? Chipotle most likely did it for pure finanical reason. It isn't trying to tell you that "hot sauce is bad for you and that we want you to think twice about using your hot sauce."

                      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                        Boston_Otter Jan 9, 2013 09:39 AM

                        There's a huge difference between health awareness and "moral values". I know what you're trying to say, but let's not get the two things confused.

                        1. re: Boston_Otter
                          Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 10:12 AM

                          Ok, then just "value" then. :) I do think our society often "merge" health value with moral value. For example, we know smoking is not good for health, and we know drinking excessive alcohol is not good neither. I am sure you have the sense from many people which associates smoker and drinkers are just bad -- as in bad person.

                          1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                            c
                            Cachetes Jan 9, 2013 10:24 AM

                            Companies promote values all of the time in the types of products they choose to make and how they choose to deliver them. Putting the salt shaker on the table is just as much an imposition of a value as taking it off. Your friend doesn't like change, and coding it in a language of freedom of choice (when frankly, who really has real freedom of choice in their consumption?) is just ludicrous. (And I know you are merely posing the question here, not a supporter of the NSA yourself.)

                            1. re: Cachetes
                              sunshine842 Jan 9, 2013 10:33 AM

                              and it's not like they've *removed* the salt completely...so what he's really complaining about is that he has to haul himself across the room to retrieve the shaker.....he's got to go over there to get a drink, anyway, so I'm not sure how being told "grab the salt while you fill your drink and get a napkin and a straw" is really all that much of a moral imposition.

                              1. re: sunshine842
                                Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 10:39 AM

                                <so I'm not sure how being told "grab the salt while you fill your drink and get a napkin and a straw" is really all that much of a moral imposition.
                                >

                                I think that may be the key. He does not want to be "told". See my response below to Cachetes. I personally do not think it is a heavy-handed lecture. It isn't like there are billboards or posters of "Salt is Bad for You" in the restaurants, but I also understand that there is definitely a message as subtle as it may be, and he does not like being told -- by a restaurant (as opposed a health agency or mom or something).

                                1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                  sunshine842 Jan 9, 2013 10:47 AM

                                  then tell him to never darken the door of an evil Boston Market again -- if enough people agree with him, they'll change.

                                  And "told" just happened to be the word I used...the salt is still there, nobody's taken it away, nobody's portioning it out...it's just sitting in a different place -- and a place he has to stop at, anyway.

                                  It would be wonderful if he could channel his frustrations toward a truly egregious imposition of morals on other people.

                                  1. re: sunshine842
                                    Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 10:52 AM

                                    <And "told" just happened to be the word I used>

                                    I know, but I actually used the same keyword when I responded to Cachetes, before I read your response. So I wasn't criticizing your word choice.

                                    To Cachetes I wrote:

                                    "it is more of an issue of Boston Market "telling" the customers that "salt is bad for you". He was unhappy about being "told" or "lectured" by a restaurant"

                                    Ok, enough of me jumping into my own question. :) I will let you guys discuss, and I will read and absorb the opinions.

                              2. re: Cachetes
                                Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 10:35 AM

                                <Companies promote values all of the time >

                                True

                                <Putting the salt shaker on the table is just as much an imposition of a value as taking it off>

                                Objectively speaking, I will say no. I don't know any restaurant put salt shaker to the table to promote "Salt is good for you", whereas I do know Boston Market is posting a message of "Salt is bad for you" when removing the salt.

                                <Your friend doesn't like change, and coding it in a language of freedom of choice >

                                Nah, he actually didn't say it is a freedom of choice issue. I debated him on this, and I think he understands that people can still get the salt if they want to, so it is not lack of freedom. For him, I think it is more of an issue of Boston Market "telling" the customers that "salt is bad for you". He was unhappy about being "told" or "lectured" by a restaurant. Let me put it this way, you know how Boston Market is also reducing salt in their other dishes beside removing the salt shaker. He has less problem of the reducing salt in the dishes.

                                <a supporter of the NSA yourself>

                                What is NSA? National Security Agency?

                                1. re: Cachetes
                                  h
                                  Hobbert Jan 9, 2013 10:37 AM

                                  Why wouldn't you have "freedom of choice in [your] consumption"? I do.

                                  1. re: Hobbert
                                    Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 10:44 AM

                                    I understand Cachetes or I think I do. You have freedom of choice of your consumption in the global sense. You can eat chicken, beef, pork. However, you may not have that choice in a particular restaurant. For example, when I walk in a Afghan restaurant, I can never have pork because the owners are usually Muslims. Oh yes, I lived in Georgia for a few year. I tell you, it is very difficult to get Pepsi in restaurants, they all serve Coke. I am sure you can think of plenty examples.

                                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                      h
                                      Hobbert Jan 9, 2013 10:52 AM

                                      I see what you're saying but you still have a choice about what to eat. You may choose to patronize an Afghan restaurant or you can stay home and drink Pepsi. No one is forcing anyone to eat at Boston Market or anywhere else. It's a very broad and rather silly statement to me.

                                      1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                        c
                                        Cachetes Jan 9, 2013 03:04 PM

                                        There is a lot of things flying around here in this conversation, so I'll just dip in a bit more and hope I'm addressing my points to all.

                                        ChemKin got my point: Choice is determined by availability, regulations, class/disposable income, location, ethics, etc. etc. So making salt unavailable would merely be one more facet of an incredibly complex matrix of consumption. (I'm not sure if matrix is the right word, but we'll go with it.) Freedom of choice is a fiction in many senses (though of course still very powerful).

                                        I have become so used to not seeing salt shakers that to see one could be construed as an overt comment on the efforts of the "food police" (someone else used that term above) to influence salt intake.

                                        But I can see your the reasons for your friend's response - the desire not to be told what to do by regulators and others with power. I get it and I have that sort of instinctive response in other situations. Though think what it would be like if we didn't have regulations!!!

                                        1. re: Cachetes
                                          jrvedivici Jan 10, 2013 07:07 AM

                                          This reminds me a bit of a story my father told me when I was a younger. It was about one of the early Russian Communist leaders (Stalin?) Anyway upon his first visit to the United States his impression was this. That our freedom's would be our down fall as a nation. Greed, gluttony, lust (pretty much all of the seven deadly sins) would lead to our downfall.

                                          I find this to be similar.....everyone knows that salt/sodium isn't good for them. Everyone knows that most if not all
                                          "fast food" is heavy in salt/sodium. So why do we take offense to a company taking a position to help remind us of this. To help remind us "this isn't good for you".......it's still available nobody is curtailing your rights to salt your food.

                                          1. re: jrvedivici
                                            g
                                            GH1618 Jan 10, 2013 07:13 AM

                                            I don't think Stalin ever visited the US. Any way, why do you suppose the purpose is to "remind us" that too much salt "isn't good for you"? That seems unlikely to me. It's just a normal business decision, I think.

                                            1. re: GH1618
                                              sunshine842 Jan 10, 2013 07:18 AM

                                              that's easy -- so they don't get sued for having contributed to someone's massive coronary because they didn't TELL anyone that their food has salt and salt can be bad if consumed in large quantities.

                                              1. re: GH1618
                                                carolinadawg Jan 10, 2013 07:50 AM

                                                I guess you can quibble about the meaning of "remind us", but here is the stated reason for the change:

                                                "By removing salt shakers from Boston Market tables, we hope to raise awareness of salt intake, without completely eliminating the option, to those who dine in our restaurants," Boston Market CEO George Michel said in the statement. "Today, we are publicly committing to further reduce sodium from menu items while still delivering the great taste for which Boston Market is known."

                                                "(R)aise awareness" is relatively close to "remind us", imo.

                                                1. re: carolinadawg
                                                  g
                                                  GH1618 Jan 10, 2013 03:23 PM

                                                  I see. I wasn't aware of that statement. If they are actually motivated by wanting to cut excessive salt use, that's good. If they were concerned about sugar, that would be better. I'm not familiar with their food, however. It's academic to me.

                                                2. re: GH1618
                                                  Chemicalkinetics Jan 10, 2013 07:59 AM

                                                  I am sure it is a business decision, but it certainly also reminds us when they put little signs everywhere. :) I am the kind of person who never use salt shakers in a restuarant, and even I noticed the signs the first visit.

                                                  http://i.usatoday.net/money/_photos/2...

                                                  I am not saying that it is not a marketing decision, but I think that the two are not mutually exclusion. You can remind the customer that salt is bad, and at the same time market yourself as a caring and health conscious orgnaization.

                                                  Kind of like Sur La Table and Williams Sonoma have marketing images of high quality cookware stores which care for their customers' needs -- through many of their marketing strategies by selling expensive and high quality cookware, by having good customer service and by offering cooking classes and knife sharpening service.

                                                  And yes, Stalin has never visited the US as far as we know.

                                                  1. re: GH1618
                                                    jrvedivici Jan 10, 2013 08:49 AM

                                                    Somewhere in this thread is a quote from the CEO of Boston Market in which they stated the company is making the decision to try and reduce the salt/sodium in their foods/dishes and the removal of the salt from tables was part of that.

                                                    The reason for the ? after Stalin was my indicating I'm not sure which Soviet leader it was. ;-)

                                                    ** See carolinadawg above for quote

                                        2. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                          m
                                          MonMauler Jan 9, 2013 11:35 AM

                                          I drink, smoke and eat salt to excess. I'm still here and loving life!

                                          1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                            k
                                            KrumTx Jan 10, 2013 07:16 AM

                                            "bad person." I hope that's not your view, as I've learned many things from you during my time on this board.

                                    2. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                      w
                                      wyogal Jan 9, 2013 11:40 AM

                                      Maybe it has more to do with keeping tables cleaner, maybe at those locations it was a pain. There is no "moral value" to this decision, it's about keeping condiments together in one place, easier to maintain.

                                      1. re: wyogal
                                        Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 12:16 PM

                                        <maybe at those locations it was a pain>

                                        I know, and surely this is probably the case for most other restaurants, but Boston Market did make it as a case for lowering sodium intake.

                                        "By removing salt shakers from Boston Market tables, we hope to raise awareness of salt intake, without completely eliminating the option, to those who dine in our restaurants," Boston Market CEO George Michel said in the statement. "Today, we are publicly committing to further reduce sodium from menu items while still delivering the great taste for which Boston Market is known."

                                        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                          w
                                          wyogal Jan 9, 2013 12:20 PM

                                          Well, then, there you have it. I don't see it as a moral issue even with that statement. They want to promote healthier eating. I guess if someone wants to call that a "moral" decision, then where is the outrage over Dairy Queen making people fat, or other restaurants for any decision they've made, for good or for ill? and those darn health food stores....
                                          I think someone is a bit too worked up over this.

                                          1. re: wyogal
                                            Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 12:41 PM

                                            To wyogal,

                                            :( Sorry, for using the wrong word. I guess I should have never said "moral" value. Just take it as "health" value then. I really need to stop injecting myself into my own question. :)

                                            sunshine,

                                            I don't know. Boston Market could totally do it quietly like other franchises. Just don't annouce the reason, which other chains and franchise have done. I believe its parent company McDonald did that. It certainly didn't have to advertise about it. It could be a spin, but certainly not a quiet spin.

                                            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                              w
                                              wyogal Jan 9, 2013 12:47 PM

                                              :)
                                              Spin is never quiet, otherwise it wouldn't be spin. They are in the business of making a profit, and this type of announcement must have been something that they hope will entice another person to become a customer, after all, they are concerned about health. ;-P

                                              1. re: wyogal
                                                Chemicalkinetics Jan 9, 2013 12:55 PM

                                                I see. In which case, this spin is still annoucing or telling the customers that what is good and what is bad. I am going to start to remove myself from the conversation. I don't want to discourage other people from expressing their views: let it be for or against Boston's Market.

                                                <this type of announcement must have been something that they hope will entice another person to become a customer>

                                                Sure, it is partly an advertisement to show or to suggest Boston Market is health and they care for the customers' health.

                                                1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                                  sunshine842 Jan 9, 2013 01:00 PM

                                                  I'm thinking they started getting a load of tweets/emails/FB posts/whatever talking about how OMG Boston Market puts salt shakers ON THE TABLE! How in this day and age can they be so unconcerned about their customers' health? Don't they know how much frigging salt is in their food?

                                                  So they take the shakers off the tables, and tell people they're trying to do their part to reduce the sodium content in the American diet.

                                                  And then they get attacked for making a moral imposition.

                                                  To rather badly paraphrase PT Barnum -- you can't make all of the people happy all of the time.

                                                  And some simply make up their mind to be unhappy.

                                                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                                    w
                                                    wyogal Jan 9, 2013 01:16 PM

                                                    But, they didn't make this decision in a vacuum, there is justifiably a focus on too much sodium/salt in the diet in America, so why not go with this flow? It's not forbidding people from adding salt. Just go get it with the rest of the condiments. No big deal, really. and yes, I think it is more than "partly" advertising. It's all about advertising, to the market that is demanding "healthier" food. That would be John/Jane Q. Public.

                                                2. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                                  jrvedivici Jan 9, 2013 01:53 PM

                                                  I don't believe Mc Donald's still owns them I believe they sold it a few years ago.

                                                  1. re: jrvedivici
                                                    bagelman01 Jan 10, 2013 04:53 AM

                                                    Correct, sold to Sun Capital Partners of Boca Raton, Florida in 2007.

                                              2. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                                sunshine842 Jan 9, 2013 12:32 PM

                                                It's just a spin....if they'd said they were doing it to reduce costs (cleaning, filling, spills, shakers that walk off) they'd have been miserly skinflints who were only looking at the bottom line.

                                        2. mudcat Jan 4, 2013 04:57 AM

                                          I wonder if they exclude salt from the foods they prepare. If they are really concerned for the health of their customers they would do this. I decide if I want additional salt with my food when I go out to eat. I expect it to be readily available on the table and should not have to ask for it.

                                          14 Replies
                                          1. re: mudcat
                                            sunshine842 Jan 4, 2013 05:05 AM

                                            you do realize that Boston Market is counter service, not table service, right? McDonald's and KFC got rid of the shakers on their tables a long time ago.

                                            And it's available -- next to the drink fountain. You don't even have to ask for it.

                                            1. re: sunshine842
                                              bagelman01 Jan 4, 2013 05:38 AM

                                              I don't know where you are, but at Boston Market one places an order at the counter, and the food is delivered to the table by an employee. The customer gets his/her own drinks, straws, napkins and can get slat and pepper at the same condiment bar.

                                              1. re: bagelman01
                                                rockandroller1 Jan 4, 2013 06:32 AM

                                                That's interesting. That has never happened at any of the ones in my location (Ohio). You order and receive the food at the counter, seat yourself, get your own drinks, etc. Much like a Jimmy Johns.

                                                1. re: rockandroller1
                                                  sunshine842 Jan 4, 2013 07:13 AM

                                                  that's the only way I've ever seen it.

                                                  1. re: sunshine842
                                                    Chemicalkinetics Jan 4, 2013 08:49 AM

                                                    I cannot remember what my Boston Market was like when I was in college... But the one in New Jersey is similar to bagelman01's description. I ordered at the counter, and an employee will deliver the foods (with me walking along) to the table I want. It was odd, I thought, but it is what it is.

                                                    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
                                                      sunshine842 Jan 4, 2013 08:52 AM

                                                      Maybe they changed over the years?

                                                      Anyway -- you still have to go to the drinks fountain to get something to drink, napkins, and straws....so grab the salt shaker while you're there. Not really a hardship or restriction.

                                                  2. re: rockandroller1
                                                    bagelman01 Jan 4, 2013 09:41 AM

                                                    my 24 year old does secret shopping to provide extra money and meals (she's in grad school, and it helps her feel independent). She showed me the Secret Shopper report for Boston Market locations here in Connecticut. She has to report the elapsed time from paying for her order until it is delivered to her table.
                                                    I've taken (within the last 60 days) my 14 year old to locations in both Stratford and Milford and the meal was also delivered to the table.

                                                  3. re: bagelman01
                                                    ttoommyy Jan 9, 2013 09:44 AM

                                                    It really does depend on where you are. Some bring the food to your table and at others you wait for your food at the counter, like McDonald's. The same for the chain Panerra. Maybe it depends on who owns the franchise?

                                                2. re: mudcat
                                                  L2k Jan 4, 2013 05:57 AM

                                                  " It will also decrease the salt by 20% for three of its popular dishes."

                                                  1. re: mudcat
                                                    carolinadawg Jan 4, 2013 06:04 AM

                                                    The average meal at Boston Market contains well more than half of the recommended daily intake of sodium, and many meal combinations contain much more. Even factoring in a 20% reduction (which only applies to 3 dishes), its hard to see that more salt is needed.

                                                    1. re: carolinadawg
                                                      bagelman01 Jan 4, 2013 06:22 AM

                                                      "its hard to see that more salt is needed."

                                                      It's not about need, it's about freedom of choice. The consumer chooses to add salt to his/her food according to his/her own taste.

                                                      BTW: I don't eat Boston Market, but my youngest child likes it and she fadds salt to the steamed vegetables and potatoes.

                                                      1. re: bagelman01
                                                        carolinadawg Jan 4, 2013 07:07 AM

                                                        And that freedom still exists. I never said otherwise, nor advocated otherwise. The wisdom of exercising that freedom is certainly questionable, however.

                                                        Thats because ultimately it is about need. One only needs a certain amount of sodium, and excessive consumption can be harmful to one's health.

                                                        1. re: bagelman01
                                                          sunshine842 Jan 4, 2013 07:15 AM

                                                          so you're allowing her the freedom of choice to consume a meal that contains an enormous percentage of the recommended daily salt allowance...and to add more.

                                                          It might be beneficial to teach her about salt intake and what it does to your body -- THEN allowing her to make the informed choice?

                                                          1. re: bagelman01
                                                            Chemicalkinetics Jan 4, 2013 09:07 AM

                                                            The freedom of adding salt is still there. Boston Market simply makes it slightly more difficult, not much more difficult. Let's say you really want salt. Well, you can pick up the salt shaker while you pick up the napkin and soda.

                                                            It will be a bit inconvenient. My friend has a similar view as yours. He realizes that it is not a denial of choice, but he sees it as a way to alter people's choice and possibly "embarras" people who feel to pick up a salt shakers....etc.

                                                      2. bagelman01 Jan 4, 2013 04:40 AM

                                                        I think this ius a great cost savings measure for Boston Market. No more sets oer table at a cost of at least $1. No more payroll to clean and reset or replace the shakers on the table. Fewer stolen shakers.
                                                        I'm all for it.
                                                        There are very few fast food joints with shakers on the table, for good reasons.

                                                        1. c
                                                          crewsweeper Jan 4, 2013 04:12 AM

                                                          At least it's a company decision and not dictated from the high and mighty, better than thou "food police". And if customers protest having to get up and get their own salt by not coming into BM franchises, then the company can easily revert the policy.

                                                          Healthwise, probably not a bad nudge assuming that salt is still used as a flavor enhancer in the cookiing.

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