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Cast iron and tin foil

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Hi all -
Getting ready to cook a pork shoulder in my enamel coated dutch oven. I have seen some suggestions to cover the pot with tin foil and then put the lid on. My question is about how tin foil reacts with cast iron...as I know it does. On the rim of the dutch oven, there is some cast iron that's exposed. Given the fact that this 8 lb. piece of meat will likely be cooking for 12 or so hours, do I need to worry about corrosion? I do know I can just do without the foil, but curious minds like mine want to know : )

 
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  1. I don't know the answer to your question about foil and enameled cast iron, but when I've done long braises in my Le Creuset, I covered it with parchment paper (as suggested in Molly Stevens "All About Braising") and it worked great.

    1. <On the rim of the dutch oven, there is some cast iron that's exposed>

      Technically speaking, the rim is usually enameled as well, just not white enameled. Practically speaking, whatever enameled it has on the rim can wear out and will reduce to bare cast iron.

      <I have seen some suggestions to cover the pot with tin foil and then put the lid on.>

      I believe that is to make a better seal, right? I don't believe the aluminum foil will have much interaction with the cast iron, so you should be safe here.

      1 Reply
      1. re: Chemicalkinetics

        I use aluminum foil to top my bare CI all the time. This ts the first I have read that it could be a problem. Don't know about enameled CI. I am new to enameled CI.

      2. I opted not to use the foil...it's a done deal. The pork is falling apart. I should go since it's rude to be typing with my mouth full!
        Thanks for your replies!

        1. Aluminum foil is no problem at all for short term contact with cast iron, bare or enameled. I always line my camp ovens with aluminum when cooking particularly messy dishes (cobblers especially)...makes cleanup a snap. Long term (think weeks...months...years), there will be a galvanic reaction between dissimilar metals like aluminum and iron, especially if there is moisture to help facilitate the reaction.

          There are parchment liners for dutch ovens and crock pots that work really well...very easy cleanup for stews and braises.

          Generally, a dutch oven with a heavy, well-fitting lid doesn't need much in the way of sealing; not sure how a bit of foil will improve seal. The only time I have foiled the lid is when I didn't want a food that can puff up (like bread pudding) to stick to a lid. Traditionally, bread dough is used when the seal needs to be truly tight.

          Glad the puled pork work out!