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HELP with the egg drop in Egg Flower soup, Hot Sour soup

s
seamunky Dec 15, 2012 09:24 PM

I can't get the egg drop right

When I have these soups at a restaurant, the soup is clear with distinct strands of egg

When I try it, the egg breaks up and becomes a cloudy mess.

Here's what I've tried: Scramble the eggs. Get the soup really hot. Trickle the scrambled egg mixture with a spoon.

I've tried swirling the soup so that the egg is swept away. I've tried lowering the temp so that there's no bubbling. I've practiced doing it separately in plain water with a dash of vinegar.

I can't get it right. The egg either sinks to the bottom and becomes large clumps or it becomes fine fine pieces that makes the broth cloudy. How do it get it so there's nice ribbons of egg without clouding the soup? Any tips and suggestions would be much appreciated!

  1. m
    magiesmom Dec 16, 2012 10:58 AM

    I mix 2 eggs with less than a teaspoon of cornstarch slurry and add after turning off the soup, slowly and gently. Swirl with chopsticks. Works every time.

    4 Replies
    1. re: magiesmom
      s
      seamunky Dec 16, 2012 08:29 PM

      thanks. so you also mix a cornstarch slurry and it seems to be about the same amount as ipsedixit...less than a tsp per 2 eggs. i'll give this a try. i think i may be rushing the process and have to just trickle in more slowly

      1. re: seamunky
        scoopG Dec 17, 2012 03:15 AM

        Adding the eggs too swiftly while the soup is not at a roiling boil is your problem here.

        1. re: scoopG
          t
          teezeetoo Dec 17, 2012 05:05 AM

          The rolling boil is important and I've also had luck when I beat in a tablespoon of hot soup to the eggs before adding.,

          1. re: scoopG
            m
            magiesmom Dec 17, 2012 05:06 AM

            I never do it while it is at a boil.

      2. scoopG Dec 16, 2012 05:13 AM

        Slowly, very slowly, add the thoroughly, just whisked eggs to the soup mixture at a roiling boil, then turn off heat.

        1. j
          jvanderh Dec 16, 2012 12:24 AM

          Have you tried bearing the eggs with water before you trickle? It should help them to pour in a thin stream.

          1 Reply
          1. re: jvanderh
            s
            seamunky Dec 16, 2012 05:01 AM

            I've tried mixing about 2 tablespoons in with 2 jumbo eggs. I was able to pour it in a thin stream but when it hit the water it spread out and made the broth cloudy.

          2. ipsedixit Dec 15, 2012 09:33 PM

            Whisk the eggs with a bit of cornstarch slurry (just reserve a bit of the cornstarch used to make the soup).

            Add the eggs only after the soup is done. Turn off the heat, swirl the soup with a spoon or chopsticks and the slowly drizzle in the eggs. Cover for a minute or two and serve immediately.

            4 Replies
            1. re: ipsedixit
              s
              seamunky Dec 16, 2012 04:59 AM

              Cornstarch slurry. . .interesting. Does this change the texture of the egg at all? How much slurry...about a tablespoon per egg?

              1. re: seamunky
                ipsedixit Dec 16, 2012 10:16 AM

                I generally don't cook based on measurements, and certainly not for something like egg drop soup.

                But I can tell you that a tablespoon would be way too much. I usually just drizzle a bit into the eggs (usu. two XL eggs), probably no more than a teaspoon, if that.

                1. re: ipsedixit
                  s
                  seamunky Dec 16, 2012 08:27 PM

                  yeah, i'm not a measurement cook either. i'm curious why you add the slurry if it is such a minute amount. is it just to thin the egg a bit? where did you pick this up? or is it just a result of being efficient and mixing the egg in the same bowl that you made the slurry?

                  1. re: seamunky
                    ipsedixit Dec 16, 2012 08:31 PM

                    Basically it's just what may mom did at our restaurant. The slurry gives the eggs a bit of body that allows it to form more robust ribbons.

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