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ethnic3

t
terpsikore Dec 13, 2012 05:53 PM

Hi Chowhound again,

Just wondering if anyone can add onto anything that the cultural centers/ churches may have missed in terms of restaurants in vancouver for:

Albanian
Bosnian
(Croatian: Croatian cultural center fri lunch?)
Macedonian
Maltese
Montenegrin (Montenegro tapas bar and grill?)

cheers!

  1. Sam Salmon Dec 13, 2012 06:35 PM

    http://balkanhouse.info/

    1. t
      terpsikore Dec 13, 2012 07:27 PM

      Thanks Sam! also found bernie's balkan kitchen and v restaurant cafe (if it's still there) but thought just in case there are restaurants for the individual countries!

      1. g
        Georgia Strait Dec 13, 2012 08:23 PM

        is this a research paper?
        seriously - curious.
        if you need Ukrainian - that's Canadian - eg Parahe.etc.

        1. LotusRapper Dec 13, 2012 08:45 PM

          I think Toronto would be a better mecca to find restos for all of these cultural groups. Seriously, lol. Metro Vancouver is an ethnically-rich region for sure, but lack the diversity of Toronto by a long shot.

          1. fmed Dec 13, 2012 08:57 PM

            Not restaurants, but you should check out JN&Z, Jovo the Butcher (both from Bosnian/Croatian deli meats) and Boemma - for Croatian groceries, etc. I haven't been to the Croatian Cultural Center for lunch in years but recall it was good.

            1. t
              terpsikore Dec 14, 2012 12:39 PM

              GS: was just thinking could probably contact you directly! seriously, not a research paper; could maybe turn into one now! as briefly mentioned before, just trying to show some foodie buds of mine who didn't travel much! interesting how you equate Ukrainian...;-p

              btw, if anyone's interested just in case, balkan house's suppose to be serbian.

              LR: I hear ya on Toronto!

              fmed: thanks!!

              3 Replies
              1. re: terpsikore
                g
                Georgia Strait Dec 14, 2012 03:13 PM

                i really like food history too!

                we are westerners so we have a strong background in various eastern european cuisines - family came here in 1900 or so. (Clifford Sifton's "stalwart peasants in sheepskin clothing" --- see what i am referring to here -his gov't policies informed much of our food out west here - most specifically prairie west http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clifford...

                what is very interesting is the themes and variations on various food items - such as what some might call perogy - we edmonton Ukraine call parahe --- or here's one for Christmas for you, Kutya. It is wheat, honey, and poppy seeds (some other cultures or regions add nuts, but we don't) - very symbolic.

                (remember the Ukrainian Christmas is in Jan so you'll have to check out the community centers at that time, too

                )

                (and that many of us are Greek Orthodox because that is what was avail at the time for our grandparents et al who came out to the west here - so check out those venues for possible food adventures) --- and of course, Greek Orthodox easter is diff than english cute bunny easter - in terms of date (and chocolate) so keep that in mind.

                next you'll have to check out the Persian foods on Lonsdale etc - tradition and symbolism. If you're downtown, go and talk to the lady who owns the Anatolia Express around the north side of conv center overlooking seaplane terminal - she's very gracious and interesting. and the food esp the hummous & fresh peda bread is great taste and value (i vote for this place often - cuz of the quality, value, casual, scenic, personality, no pretense)

                1. re: Georgia Strait
                  LotusRapper Dec 14, 2012 03:36 PM

                  GS: "what is very interesting is the themes and variations on various food items - such as what some might call perogy - we edmonton Ukraine call parahe --- or here's one for Christmas for you, Kutya. It is wheat, honey, and poppy seeds (some other cultures or regions add nuts, but we don't) - very symbolic."

                  If you don't have it already, you should buy this book:

                  http://www.amazon.ca/Flatbreads-Flavo...

                  Which brought Jeffrey Alford and Naomi Duguid to fame. I love how the variations of breads (and their names, ingredients and techniques) illustrate the anthropological, social, economical and cultural migratory patterns of our world.

                  1. re: LotusRapper
                    g
                    Georgia Strait Dec 14, 2012 05:43 PM

                    that's interesting - and it says it's "in stock" (just had to say that food pun)

                    i am fascinated by food -- thank you for the info. I remember years ago, there was the lady on Peter Gzowski CBC (was that MorningSide? - can't recall) - Margaret Visser - she wrote books about food and manners etc (not etiquette - rather a more sociolgy POV -- for example, why we don't fly about with our knives as we eat and chat at the table - it would have been threatening)

                    in any event, mele kalikimaka - i enjoy your informative posts (i say in that language cuz does the OP know there is Hawaiian heritage in BC, i believe because of the HBC - Kanaka Creek in Maple Ridge, also present on Saltspring - I wonder how that influenced BC food cuz i know our Albertan family parahe went to live on in So Cal and then HI

                    the united nations of food - i think if we all eat together, it would make a difference ; )

              2. t
                terpsikore Dec 14, 2012 07:16 PM

                fmed: thanks! heard of Jovo from while ago!

                GS: thanks again! yes food history and variations. I remember I went to my first ethnic restaurant long ago, think it' s Rasputin, and ordered fried dough and I was interested then that other cultures also deep fried their dough (thanks LR). and of course not to mention perogies or all the dumplings looking like items or pasta/ noodles, etc...regarding Greek cultures, yes seems to have huge festivals here...Turkish food is my fav, if not one of for sure, and been to Anatolia's gate in BBy, wonder if they are affiliated, not bad as well....cheerio

                2 Replies
                1. re: terpsikore
                  g
                  Georgia Strait Dec 14, 2012 07:50 PM

                  yes the two Anitolia's are related - the BBY location has the oven and more extensive menu - the one downtown is very small, just a few tables, hence the express name - we like it.

                  1. re: terpsikore
                    LotusRapper Dec 14, 2012 10:50 PM

                    Did someone mention ...... fried dough ??? :-D

                    http://i.imgur.com/S0fnk.jpg

                  2. t
                    terpsikore Dec 14, 2012 07:29 PM

                    GS: the food pun is funnie! indeed about fascination, in fact, the chowhound community! guess the tapanyaki chefs throwing knives around while he's cooking for us (for show) and we are eating doesn't count? (jk) but common sense too I hear you.
                    i also agree about eating together since visiting all those restaurants is also about learning about the cultures, their resources, etc as well!

                    1. t
                      terpsikore Dec 14, 2012 08:14 PM

                      GS: right on and sounds good!

                      1. t
                        terpsikore Dec 15, 2012 09:54 AM

                        LR: hahahaha

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