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Wusthof Classic Fine Edge Nakiri Knife? Any good?

I keep seeing some good deals on the Wusthof Classic Fine Edge Nakiri Knives. Is it any good? Many years ago I bought a Wusthof Classic Santoku with cullens and it was a total waste. It was built like a German Chef''s knife and cut like it.

Is the Wusthof Classic Fine Edge Nakiri Knife built like a descent Asian Nakiri? Has anyone handled one in person?

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  1. I have no idea. I am bumming this up and hopefully others can answer this.

    What I do know is that generally speaking, a Wusthof Classic Nakiri is more expensive than a Tojiro DP Nakiri. A Wusthof Nakiri on amazon is now $99. A Tojiro DP Nakiri is $69, and I suspect the Tojiro to be just as good and probably better. Just something to consider.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics

      Cutlery and More was $60 last time I looked but, I have seen several for ~$45 on-line.

    2. Bought the Wustof East West classic set, 6 inch chef and 7 inch fine nakiri. Hundred bucks. Frankly, wish I had instead purchased the 8 inch wide chef's knife.

      47 Replies
      1. re: brooktroutchaser

        The small chef's knives don't make much sense to me but, the Nakiri profile has its uses.

        I should note, that I really like my 10" Wusthof chef's knife and 300mm Gyuto.

        1. re: Sid Post

          <300mm Gyuto>

          Nice. I have not had the pleasure to use a large gyuto (~12 inch).

          1. re: Sid Post

            my small chef's knife sees a lot of duty in my house: smaller hands perhaps, but i like the amount of control i can get with the smaller knife

          2. re: brooktroutchaser

            6 weeks later, and four Chinese cleavers later, I can say the Wusthof is okay. The western handle now seems inappropriate, but the knife slices well and will take an edge. And many thanks to all here who helped educate me regarding Asian knives and cleavers.

            1. re: brooktroutchaser

              I take it that the 4 Chinese cleavers did not work out for you then. Sorry to hear that. At least your Wusthof worked out fine for you.

              1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                Chem,
                In fact am enjoying playing with cleavers! Thinking about miso no 61.

                1. re: brooktroutchaser

                  I see. I read your previous statement wrong. I thought you meant after the bad experience of four Chinese cleavers, the Wusthof no longer looks so bad. Now, I can see that I assumed too much there.

                  Misono does look nice for the stainless steel. It is a bit higher than your original price range, but it has a good reputation.

                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                    Have been playing with cheap cleavers, giving them away, learning skills. Thanks!

                    1. re: brooktroutchaser

                      I got a cheap one from Taiwan and it is working out GREAT! Did I mention the cheap price?

                      1. re: Sid Post

                        Is it contaminated with lead? :)

                        So have you gotten a Nakiri at the end?

                        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                          It's more of a chinese cleaver. Large and really thin.

                    2. re: Chemicalkinetics

                      I really do not want carbon upkeep. Just ordered a Messermeister chinese precision knife. Will report on it soon.

                      1. re: brooktroutchaser

                        But Misono (the one you were looking at) is not carbon steel. It is a stainless steel. Anyway, let us know how the Messermeister works out for you. Thanks for the update.

                        1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                          Right. $84 for Messermeister precision. Western handle, alas. There are You Tube videos of a fellow using it.

                          1. re: brooktroutchaser

                            :) This guy?

                            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfprOH...

                            I actually have seen his videos. He is good, but he can be cocky. I didn't know he was using Messermeister Precision Cleaver until I searched again.

                            Good luck, and keep us updated.

                            1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                              Yup. Seems properly thin and a hardness I can sharpen. Will I be content or feel an urge to spend more later? Some folks need a BMW, others a Scion. Time will tell how obsessive I am.

                              1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                Has the knife arrived or are you still waiting?

                                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                  Just ordered. It will be a few days. I can over think this stuff, but in the end I am just cutting onions. I promise a report.

                                  1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                    Hopefully, it will make cutting onions easier and more fun.

                              2. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                Messermeister made in Japan cleaver arrived. $84 from that big online place. Thin, western handle, nicely finished, sharp enough to shave arm hair. It fit my price point. Is it ten times better than the Myland cleaver from the local Chinese grocery? Dunno. But it is a reasonable slicer for 84 bucks. Again, thank you to all who helped educate me about Asian blades. Both the cleaver and the nakiri are adding value and joy to my cooking prep.

                                1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                  <Messermeister made in Japan cleaver arrived>

                                  Really? I didn't know this. This can be a good sign.

                                  It this cleaver thin? Compare to Myland cleavers? I have see a lot of Myland cleavers. Most of the Myland cleaver are inexpensive low quality cleavers. I also suspect that your Myland Cleaver to be "medium-thickness" blade. I hope your Messermeiser is thinner.

                                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                    Yes, it is thinner than the # 4 Myland cleaver; it is a true slicer.

                                    1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                      :) Thanks god. I was so worry that it isn't. Great. Now that you have a slicer, I think you will enjoy it. Just make sure that you treat it as a standard knife for slicing meat, cutting vegetables, mincing herb, but do not ever use it to chop bones. Slicers are much better for light tasks, but much worse for heavy tasks like break bones. Good luck.

                                  2. re: brooktroutchaser

                                    Wow.  I didn't know it was made with a Japanese blade.  I'm guessing the undefined stainless steel @ 57-58hrc is probably AUS-8 or some sort of molybdenum steel.  Way  better than a std. Chinese one.  Nice find. 

                                    1. re: JavaBean

                                      Yes: this is the Asian Precision model, made in Japan.

                                      1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                        Can you do a follow up on it, after some usage.

                                        1. re: JavaBean

                                          Initial use exceeds expectations. Will update after more vegetables fall prey in future. Appears to be pretty good value, but I do not have any experience with high end J knives, JavaBean.

                                          1. re: JavaBean

                                            See Albert Yang you tube how to cut video; he is using this knife.

                                              1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                LOL. In the 70s I played with Sheffield carbon knives a bit, making some from kits; in the 80s I was gifted some German knives, and was content. Today? Thanks to you folks I am a cleaver convert. I did not expect a born again cutlery experience. Thank you for all your kindness.

                                                1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                                  I am just glad that you have the chance to play with different cutlery tools.

                                                  In term of cutlery tools (not steel but style), my two biggest discoveries are (1) my first CCK Chinese thin slicer and (2) a Japanese Honesuki. I have used Chinese cleavers for a long time, but had not used a Chinese thin slicer until my first CCK. It was a big revelation. As for the Japanese honeusuki, it simply performed much better at deboning chicken than any other knives I had before it.

                                                  There are just so much to discover.

                                                  :)

                                                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                    Ah. I do not debone chicken. I spatchcock mostly and roast and for that kitchen shears work well. :-)

                                            1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                              Will do. Size is 8 inch by 3 1/4 inch.

                                               
                                               
                                              1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                                Update: the nakira has become my tomato knife. Messermeister Asian precision Chinese knife is a great bargain at $84 and a wonderful thin slicer; can highly recommend to anyone who wants stainless. Made in Japan.

                                                1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                                  Thanks for the feedback. Can you elaborate a bit more? For example, I am interested in how your Messermeister Asian Precision Chinese knife compares to your other cheaper (~$15) Chinese knives? Is the Messermeister Asian knife really thinner?

                                                  In addition, why is the nakira becoming the tomato knife? Is it because the Messermeister knife is not sharp enough to cut the tomatoes and ends up crushing the tomatoes? Is it because the nakiri is smaller can give you better control? Many thanks.

                                                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                    The Messermeister is thinner and much sharper. I cannot sharpen the nakiri quite so much. The smaller nakiri I can use like a paring knife, holding a tomato in my hand and cutting it into wedges. Comparing the two, the Messermeister is much the better slicer and holds an edge longer.

                                                    I have given away the cheap cleavers.

                                                        1. re: JavaBean

                                                          JavaBean, thanks. I learned so much. I gifted a cheap cleaver to a poor grad student who only owned a bread knife. All my castoffs went to good homes, but that was the best!

                                                          1. re: brooktroutchaser

                                                            You know. If you are really generous, then you should keep the cheap cleaver and give the grad student the Messermeister Precision cleaver. :)

                                                            1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                              I am not really generous, Chem. Nor foolish.

                                                            2. re: brooktroutchaser

                                                              Awesome, it sounds like you're well on your way towards knife nerd land. Don't forget a starter jknife will give you a taste of higher end blades, and more importantly not punish you for doing something you shouldn't do if and when you decide to advance further.

                                              2. re: JavaBean

                                                < I'm guessing the undefined stainless steel @ 57-58hrc is probably AUS-8 or some sort of molybdenum steel. >

                                                Probably, consider that it is a Made in Japan knife, and it is a $80 knife.

                                                1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                  Java and all,

                                                  The name "Asian Precision" started to ring the bell more and more in my head. Then I remember Mark from Chefknivestogo was selling those.

                                                  Yes, these are made of AUS-8. Make perfect sense HRC~58 steel made in Japan...etc.

                                                  " These knives are made of high carbon no-stain molybdenum AUS8 steel with a beautiful, riveted handle. "

                                                  http://www.chefknivestogo.com/messerm...

                                                  "Messermeister Asian Precision Cutlery has indestructible POM handles and full tang construction. The blades are high carbon chrome moly alloy (AUS8 Steel). "

                                                  http://www.chefdepot.net/messermeiste...

                                                  1. re: Chemicalkinetics

                                                    With the Misono mentioned above using the same or similiar blade steel for more money, this maybe a undiscovered gem.

                                2. re: brooktroutchaser

                                  Asian cleavers are not for everyone. Due to the blade height, weight and balance, it's difficult to hold and use a cleaver in the same manner as western chef's knife (ie. two finger pinch grip/ loose wrist). If you're having control and fatigue issues, try holding the blade with three fingers (thumb on one side, index and middle finger splayed out (inverted peace sign) on the side of the blade. Also try locking your wrist; elevate the knife using your arm/elbow and let the weight of the blade do the work.