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spritz cookies

I have been trying to make spritz cookies like my mom did. It seems I have alot of trouble getting the dough to stick to the cookie sheet from the press. I am not sure what I am doing wrong. The first few that worked looked and tasted great..but then Ifought the rest to stick to pan when I pull the press away.

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  1. Are you using a silpat on your cookie sheet? Sometimes the silpat's nonstick surface doesn't allow the cookie to adhere enough when pulling the press away. Try switching to parchment paper. Also, you must use a very quick motion when pulling away. Lastly, make sure your dough is stiff enough and not soft and sticky. I refrigerate my dough for a little while before using and in between batches.

    1 Reply
    1. re: ttoommyy

      thank you very much... have not tried parchment paper yet.

    2. Chill the baking sheets! Spritz cookies are the only cookie I don't use parchment or a silpat for--they are usually very butter-rich. A well-chilled cookie sheet holds on to the dough when you pull the press away. If I can't find room in the fridge/freezer, I just chuck them out in the snow to cool off between batches.

      2 Replies
      1. re: pavlova

        Thanks. I have heard somewhere about chilling the cookie sheet. Have not done that yet. Thanks again.

        1. re: pavlova

          this is a great idea - I chill the dough and use naked sheets, but never thought of chilling the sheets! been making spritz for years and the process often involves a lot of frustration and profanity by the end . . . maybe this year'll be different!

          GG
          http://www.semisweetonline.com

        2. DO NOT USE PARCHMENT OR GREASE YOUR BAKING SHEET. And as others have said, make sure the baking sheet is cold or at least cool.

          1. A thread I started a couple years ago that has a wealth of tips on making spritz cookies:

            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/751308

            2 Replies
            1. re: masha

              I remember that thread, masha! Good times :)
              The best tip I can offer is chill the dough filled gun. LIke others here, I don't use any pan liners and I've never chilled the trays (certaintly won't hurt to chill them). The # 1 issue is usually the dough though not the baking trays or the gun. The dough should be like playdough.

              1. re: HillJ

                Thanks HillJ.

                And to the Original Poster, here is a link to another thread (from last year), that includes more advice on Spritz cookies, including issues of getting the dough the right consistency for them to release properly.

                http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/818504

            2. I just made this recipe from the Wilton site:

              http://www.wilton.com/idea/Classic-Sp...

              I bought the new Oxo spritz cookie maker, and it is absolutely the best spritz cookie maker I have ever used. The fail rate was non-existent, except for the very first trial cookie. I also chilled the cookie sheets, but this was so effortless, I may try them on parchment next time.

              6 Replies
              1. re: roxlet

                Wilton is the Spritz master! Been saying that for decades.

                1. re: roxlet

                  I love OXO products; had no idea they have a cookie press. I will have to check it out. I use an Italian one that I have had for years with no real problems, but have about a 15% do-over rate. If the OXO really has a 0% fail rate, then I would get it.

                  1. re: ttoommyy

                    It supposedly just came out. I was at Chef Central, and scored one with a 25% off coupon, it it's only $30 anyway. Plus, it's got a very nice plastic container for the disks -- each one fits in a little slot. I'm really thrilled with it, and will toss my old one, which I found so frustrating that I rarely used it. Now I want to try some other spritz recipes.

                      1. re: ttoommyy

                        May do some shopping! Love spritz cookies, but I've tossed at least 4 cookie presses for producing "spritz bits." (Well, some could be user-error, I reckon.) Lots of good ideas here. Love OXO products, and with my arthritis, find their designs to be wonderful. Thanks for sharing your expertise.

                  2. re: roxlet

                    Roxlet, that's the same recipe I've been using (thanks to HillJ directing me to it, if I remember correctly). The almond extract makes them particularly delicious.

                  3. I've not tried the chilled pan idea, but will this year. I do find that a little twist of the wrist helps to detach the press itself from the dough. Also, key to push out enough dough - too little, and yes, it sticks to the press. So I push enough for a chubby-looking cookie, then twist slightly while lifting. Of course, this year I will be thinking about it while pressing, and it will probably not work!!

                    1. I made them growing up when there was no thing as parchment or silpat...or at least not in my neck of the woods.
                      I learned to chill the baking sheets and the dough with a recipe my grandmother gave me.

                      18 Replies
                      1. re: latindancer

                        I've been making them for over 40 years and when I first started there was nothing but a metal cookie sheet; no parchment, no silpat (at least available to me). Yes, the cookies turned out fine but some stuck, while other got burned. Now I use a silpat and all of my cookies come out uniformly done and don't stick. Sometimes innovations are a good thing. ;)

                        1. re: ttoommyy

                          I just did them right on the sheet, and I wound up letting my first batch cool too much, and most of them broke as I tried to get them off. It's too bad because they were a really cute fleur d'lys shape. Next time, I'll use parchment.

                          1. re: roxlet

                            A good hint when using parchment is to tack down the four corners of the paper with a small piece of dough so the paper does not lift when picking up the cookie press with each cookie.

                            1. re: ttoommyy

                              Or slightly dampen the cookie tray and then lay the parchment down and it will adhere long enough for you to knock out your rows of cookies for the oven.

                              1. re: HillJ

                                Good tips, ttoommyy and HillJ!

                                1. re: HillJ

                                  I use metal bullnose binder clips from the office supply store to clip the parchment onto the sheet pan. You can remove them before baking, but they can withstand oven heat of at least 400, IME.

                            2. re: ttoommyy

                              Every spritz recipe I've ever encountered advises to bake the cookies on a bare, ungreased baking sheet. The dough needs to cling to the sheet in order to release from the press and form properly.

                              I just use regular professional half sheet pans. I have never, in many years of making spritz, seen a spritz cookie stick even a little bit.

                              1. re: sandylc

                                Saw my own reply from over a year ago--since then, I bought the Oxo press, and this holiday season, made over 12 dozen spritz cookies. No parchment paper, no greasing the cookie sheets. Room temp butter in the recipe, and the just-sprtized cookies adhere just fine to the cookie sheet. I have read some folks say they chill the cookie sheet briefly before spritzing, but I haven't done that.

                                1. re: pine time

                                  I agree. I've done the cookies with, without, laid down over a fine powder dusting of cinnamon all before baking. And I keep a gun chilled in the frig with diff dough year round. Sometimes cookies, often cracker ready to go. I find most folks don't use their Spritz guns year round. I love the thing.

                                  1. re: HillJ

                                    Wow, interesting idea! How long do you need to leave it at room temp before it's good to go?

                                    Do you do a cheese version?

                                    1. re: sandylc

                                      I take the Spritz gun out just as I'm preheating the oven. By the time my temp is ready the gun is ready to roll. If it needs a bit more give I run the gun under a warm tap for a few seconds.

                                      Crackers: olive oil and rosemary is in the gun right now for tomorrow and I place a piece of parm cheese on each cracker after they cool. But soft cheese works great in a cracker blend. I made a crushed black pepper and horseradish cracker @ Christmas.

                                      1. re: HillJ

                                        Another use for the gun is ornaments. I'm not sure if I ever got around to sharing that. We make a dough that consists of powdered cinnamon (buy the really cheap stuff) and applesauce (also the cheap brand) and blend the two together to create a dough we can extrude. Then pump out your shapes, create a hole with a chopstick for hanging and let the ornaments air dry. Once dry, tie a ribbon through the hole and hang.

                                        You can add additional spices, glitter 'em up if you like. But they smell great when your Christmas tree lights warm them and last one season.

                                          1. re: HillJ

                                            Will wildlife eat them once the tree is gone, or is there too much cinnamon? If so, I imagine subbing flour for half the cinnamon might do the trick and still scent the home.

                                            1. re: greygarious

                                              Birds supposedly don't taste--that's why there's a red pepper bird food that the birds can eat, but keeps the squirrels away--so the birds might eat the cinnamon/apple sauce ornaments.

                                              1. re: pine time

                                                pine t & greyg, these go on the indoor tree.

                                                Now, there's nothing stopping you from making this cinnamon/a.sauce dough, rolling it out and using traditional cookie cutters or free form designs, drying them, and tying around a house lamp for the same scent anytime.

                                                1. re: HillJ

                                                  I realized that - was just thinking about repurposing after the holidays. In some areas, it's necessary to dispose of the tree at New Year's because that's the only time the trash disposal company will take them. But if you have a house, and other means of disposal (I have woods on my property), you can put your tree in a protected spot where it will provide a good roosting place for overwintering birds. I can tie mine onto my deck, adjacent to the bird feeders, so they can be sheltered while waiting their turn. If ornaments are edible, you can leave them on the tree when you put it out for the rest of the winter.
                                                  Although, if you do a full-on Martha holiday, you decorate a live outdoor tree with edible garlands and ornaments specifically for the wildlife....

                                                  1. re: greygarious

                                                    No full on MS Christmas for the HllJ gang. We are pretty low key on the exterior decorating. White lights and a big door wreath. Inside we get a bit wild but what you're describing for the birds sounds quite nice.

                            3. In the midst of cranking out a million spritz right now, and I have to say, the tip to chill the sheets has changed my life. I am usually experiencing what I call "cookie press rage" at this point - swearing (or trying not to if my DD is around), etc. But they're sticking, no problem! Very very low failure rate and my blood pressure is normal . . . thanks all!

                              GG
                              http://www.semisweetonline.com