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Eggnog [split from SF Bay]

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  • jaiko Nov 28, 2012 07:53 PM
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It's so easy to make eggnog, I don't understand why any one would buy a commercial nog. They're never as good. Milk, sugar, eggs, liquor: so simple. I make a cooked eggnog. Started doing it during the salmonella scare a couple of decades ago and we decided we liked it better. We're not fond of the beaten egg whites so we use the whole egg and lactose-free milk. Fresh nutmeg is a given, and I also like a whisper of ground cardamon in it.

This year I made a non-dairy eggnog for some friends, using a blend of soy and coconut milks. To offset the nutty flavor of the soy, I sweetened it with brown sugar. Some rum and brandy, and my friends loved it. They were very excited to have a non-dairy version they could enjoy.

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  1. Hi jaiko,

    Would you mind sharing your cooked eggnog recipe? I've been searching for a good one. I guess you might have to start a thread on Home Cooking. Much appreciated.

    2 Replies
    1. re: TerriL

      For now (until jaiko returns with the answer), I will hazard a guess it's essentially a 'tempered' egg-nog. I wonder if that might help thicken it too.

      1. re: TerriL

        This is a recipe I developed when my diabetic father-in-law was alive. It became a long-standing Christmas Eve tradition. He really looked forward to it.
        It is not non-dairy, but it does qualify for your request re: "cooked eggnog" recipe. It is also non-alcoholic, for tjinsf's request (any minimal alcohol in extracts is spread out among 20 servings).

        We have tried some other eggnogs since Dad's passing, but none seem to measure up to the following:

        SUGAR FREE OLD FASHIONED EGGNOG
        4+1/2 Cups milk
        6 egg yolks
        1 pint Edy's no-sugar added vanilla ice cream
        1/4 cup bulk Nutrasweet (Not from packets) i.e., "Equal Spoonful"
        2 teaspoons brandy extract or rum extract
        1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
        1/4 cup powdered meringue, such as "Just Whites"
        3/4 cup water
        1/4 teaspoon salt
        1/4 cup (again) bulk Nutrasweet (not from packets) i.e., "Equal Spoonful"
        Nutmeg
        Chilled punchbowl and/or chilled glasses

        Note time frames. Plan ahead, and start the night before. [Steps 1- 4 are followed by refrigeration of minimum of 3 hours]

        1. Heat milk over medium heat until a rim of fine bubbles appears around edge of pan.
        2. Beat egg yolks until thick and lemon-colored. Add a small amount of hot milk to the egg yolks. Return all to the saucepan.
        3. Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Pour into bowl. Add ice cream by the spoonful, stirring until melted. Add 1/4 cup bulk Nutrasweet, brandy extract and vanilla extract. Cover and refrigerate for a minimum of 3 hours, or a day ahead of serving.

        4. Also, several hours ahead of serving, or the night before: Combine "Just Whites" powder and water according to directions on the can. Refrigerate for several hours.
        5. Closer to serving time, remove "Just Whites" from refrigerator and let stand at room temp. in large bowl, for 15 minutes.
        6. Using an electric mixer, beat "Just Whites" mixture until foamy. Add salt and continue beating until soft peaks form. Add 1/4 cup bulk Nutrasweet, 1 Tablespoon at a time, beating constantly.
        7. Continue beating until Nutrasweet is dissolved, and mixture is glossy and stands in soft peaks.
        8. Fold custard mixture into "Just Whites" mixture, using a large wire whisk.
        9. Pour eggnog into chilled punchbowl. Ladle into punch cups and sprinkle with nutmeg.

        Makes 20 1/2cup servings

        Notes:
        "Just Whites" comes in 8 oz can/ from Deb-El Foods Corp., Elizabeth, NJ.

        Nutraweet or "Equal" in packets is much sweeter than the "Equal" in bulk. By our measurements, its more than 4 times more concentrated. They are not interchangable!
        Submitted by Florida Hound

      2. do you have a good non-alcoholic version? Is that even possible?

        1. We make a half cooked version - eggs are pasteurized well before they are cooked so you can get the taste and texture of raw eggs in a very safe manner (I'm actually not that worried about raw eggs and also use them without pasteurization - but we usually make eggnog in largish quantities that take several days to consume - hence we like to pasteurize the eggs). You can google to find many techniques for home egg pasteurization.

          Many commercial eggnogs (including clover) are thickend with a variety of thickeners and homemade eggnog tends to be thinner. Just looking at the website I see carageenan and topioca starch.

          On the other hand, Strauss Organic Eggnog doesn't use any thickeners and the ingredient list is much more like homemade. For me it has a more natural flavor than Clover (I suspect that many people are more familiar with artificial eggnog flavor than homemade eggnog and for that reason clover heads in that direction).

          My main complaint with strauss is that their eggnog is not "eggy" enought - but it does have a great dairy/cream flavor.

          For comparison here are the ingredients

          Straus:
          Pasteurized organic milk, organic cream, organic cane sugar, organic egg yolk, organic nutmeg

          Clover:
          Organic milk and organic cream, organic sugar, organic nonfat milk powder, organic egg yolks, organic tapioca starch, organic nutmeg, salt, carrageenan, organic natural flavor, organic annatto & organic tumeric

          1. I make my own eggnog, but still buy a quart of the Clover organic every year. I use the blender nog recipe from Hesser's NY Times Cookbook.

            1. Hmmm, I didn't use a recipe, actually, for the non-dairy eggnog. If I remember correctly, it was:

              8 eggs
              1 qt vanilla flavored soy milk (you could use plain soy; this is what I had to use up from my pantry as it was getting near its pull date!)
              1 qt coconut milk
              approx 3/4 cup to 1 cup of lt. brown sugar, NOT packed down - more to taste if you're using plain soy milk
              Fresh nutmeg for grating - approx 1/2 tsp, plus a pinch of ground cardamon

              Put the 8 eggs and 2 cups of either milk (not both, unless you've got a much bigger blender than I do!) and blend for 1 minute. Pour into a large enough pan, add the rest of the liquid and all the sugar. Cook, stirring constantly, until it thickens, about 8-10 minutes. Add the spices, stir and remove from heat.

              (Non-stick pans, BTW, make boiled custards MUCH easier!)

              Cover or place a piece of plastic wrap over the top to cool for 45 minutes. Add liquor to taste - I used about 1/2 cup each golden rum and a decent brandy. Refrigerate overnight to ripen.

              If you don't want to add alcohol, be careful not to make your eggnog too sweet! I'm guessing at the amount of sugar in this recipe because I started with 1/2 cup and then added some more as I went along.

              10 Replies
              1. re: jaiko

                Thanks jaiko . . . for the dairy version did you follow the same procedure/recipe, just using 2 quarts lactose-free milk rather than soy and coconut milk?

                1. re: TerriL

                  Sorry, TerriL, I didn't come back to this thread until now, so did not see your question.

                  Dairy version would use 1 qt regular milk, 1 qt 1/2 and 1/2 (which unfortunately doesn't come lactose-free, but oh well!), and 9 eggs. The coconut milk was thicker in viscosity than milk, so it didn't need the extra egg. White sugar, not brown. Fresh nutmeg, allspice instead of cardamon.

                  I've never thought melted ice cream tastes like anything except melted ice cream. There aren't enough eggs in it to taste like anything but sugar and cream. Now, melted CUSTARD ice cream, maybe - but that's a rare find these days. Also, too much vanilla in the commercial products for my liking. I use vanilla in my custards but not the eggnog.

                  1. re: jaiko

                    Has to be Hagen-Daazs to work.

                    Never could figure out what is different about custard ice cream.

                    1. re: jaiko

                      Is regular milk 3.5%? or 2%

                      1. re: jaiko

                        Used your recipe this weekend, great flavour, but it never thickened at all? is this normal or did I do something wrong?

                        1. re: cleopatra999

                          The egg nog was thoroughly enjoyed this holiday. I will definitely make it again, no one seemed concerned about the lack of thickness as it was quite rich. I will add more booze next time though as we all felt it needed more, it mellowed after a day of sitting. huge hit and super easy though!!

                          1. re: cleopatra999

                            I don't see why jaiko's recipe can't be "modified" and get your thickened results...
                            We stick with our time-tested separating yolks from the whites and beating the whites to soft peaks, adding a little salt and beating some more (I don't know the science behind the 'salt,' but that's what our own recipe called for). Then fold the whites in, little by little, to the main part of the eggnog.
                            A person posted on Chowhound last year that they were concerned about the whites just floating around the top. But folding them in thoroughly should really avoid that concern.

                            1. re: Florida Hound

                              I believe I had this 'separated' style of egg nog before and found it a bit frothy, perhaps the chef did not incorporate the whites well enough.

                        2. re: jaiko

                          I will be endeavouring this recipe in a few minutes, but with no access to half and half so am attempting to use 1L 4.5% and then a mix of 200ml 47%, 200ml 37% and 500ml 2%. Quite the concoction it will be. I will see if there is any issue thickening, but I suspect I will already begin thicker then normal. Alcohol will solve any over thickening :P

                          Also I have no blender, and will try to use a food processor for the task, plus have no access to fresh nutmeg, but did find ground nutmeg and allspice much to my surprise.

                          I guess it will be very loosely based on your recipe, but I am sure will be delicious.

                          1. re: TeRReT

                            Sorry for the delay replying to this, have been busy.

                            I followed your recipeish. It didn't work exactly as yours did, but given you kind of came up with the recipe and it isn't exactly a recipe and I didn't follow it really but was rather inspired from it, this is to be expected.

                            Now to be clear, it was extremely easy, and the end result was fantastic. Without a doubt I will make it again next year. The only issue I had was that it didn't thicken after 10 minutes. Now I say issue, but this was no issue at all, I understand recipes are only guidelines, and I felt I was too gentle on the starting heat so it just needed more time. After bumping up the heat, and leaving it another 5-10 minutes, it reduced enough and was perfect consistency. I should have put plastic wrap on the top and as a result of not doing so a layer of film was created while cooling. I strained this off and had no issues with texture. I added a mix of bourbon and Canadian Whiskey. While this tasted fine, I forgot that where I am from, its more normal to add rum instead. So the only change I will make next year is to add a good quality dark rum and to double the recipe as everyone drank it and loved it.

                    2. I love homemade cooked eggnog! Much better than both purchased and raw ones. Here's a secret no-work eggnog: Buy some vanilla Hagen-Daazs and put it in the refrigerator instead of the freezer. In a few hours, open it, pour it into a beautiful glass pitcher, add booze if desired, and top with freshly grated nutmeg. The ingredients are EXACTLY the same as eggnog and it is delicious. Yes, pricey for large quantities, but no work. (And, at the price of cream these days, maybe not as pricey as you'd think).

                      3 Replies
                      1. re: sandylc

                        This thread inspired me to crack open the half gallon of "milk nog" I bought today at the store. I gave my husband a taste, and he said "it tastes like melted ice cream."

                        1. re: relizabeth

                          They are indeed the same thing....

                          1. re: sandylc

                            I think you all have motivated me to try my own egg nog. thanks! Nice thing is I can make an organic one for much cheaper than purchasing it premade

                      2. Try "Eggnog the hard way" from the NYTimes magazine.

                        http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/09/mag...

                        1. I have been making raw egg nog for over a decade without any ill effects, but the microbiologists at Rockefeller University have been doing this over 40 years and shown that the alcohol we mix with raw eggs actually ends up sterilizing them over time. So while I'm enjoying my 3-month old batch this December, I am looking forward to trying a 15-month bottle in 2013.
                          http://www.npr.org/templates/story/st...

                          1 Reply
                          1. re: JungMann

                            I was wondering whether the liquor really did sterilize the eggs. I had a roommate years ago who always made her family's very boozy eggnog at Christmas. She insisted it had to sit in the fridge for at least 15 days to kill the bacteria and take the raw taste of the liquor away. It was very delicious and the long mellowing period did make it seem way less potent than it actually was, but I was never sure until I read the transcript from NPR whether the bacteria were indeed killed or whether we were all just very lucky, as well as tipsy.

                          2. thanks for this thread. I have become very lactose intolerant this past year and I LOVE eggnog. I've never made it, but now I have the inspiration to try with almond milk. No booze though for me.

                            1 Reply
                            1. re: laliz

                              Laliz,
                              I make my eggnog with almond milk and eggbeaters, sugar, vanilla and nutmeg.
                              I cook it a little to thicken it up some, and it is pretty darn good. It's admittedly not quite as rich as the real thing, but it is WW friendly and lactose free.