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Small induction roasting dish

f
featheronawire Nov 30, 2012 03:12 AM

Anyone have any ideas what I can find out there. I have been googling for the last six months to find something like a heavy duty rectangular cake tin which I can use for roasting and making gravy on the hob afterwards, I found a brilliant roaster made by Ready Steady Cook with a lid which is brilliant for open roastin in the lid, closed roasting for chickens etc with the lid on, goes atraight on the hob for gravy BUT it is too big for weekday nights when I am just cooking for two. I like to do roast potatoes in goose fat so it would be great to cook those separely from the meat...... I can't be the first with this problem. Tell me I don't have to go back to civilisation to get gas, I like living in the middle of nowhere.

  1. f
    featheronawire Nov 30, 2012 03:13 AM

    Please forgive my typing, I am on my notebook.....sigh

    4 Replies
    1. re: featheronawire
      Sid Post Nov 30, 2012 07:25 AM

      Have you considered a small shallow dutch oven? In Europe, I see them referred to as shallow casseroles,

      The Staub 2 3/4 quart round Dutch Oven which retails at $100USD around me sounds like a perfect match.
      http://www.cutleryandmore.com/content/products/large/25341.jpg

      Or maybe a small braiser.
      http://www.cutleryandmore.com/content...

      1. re: featheronawire
        tanuki soup Nov 30, 2012 08:30 PM

        How about a Le Creuset enameled cast iron rectangular roaster? As I'm sure you know, LC works great on induction. This one measures about 8 x 13 x 2 inches.

        http://www.amazon.com/Le-Creuset-Cast...

         
        1. re: tanuki soup
          kaleokahu Nov 30, 2012 09:16 PM

          Hi, tanuki, how you been?

          Your suggestion is great from an induction-compatibility standpoint. I have one of these. The problem I have with it is the enamel lining--the fond/jus/fat is just never right roasting on/above enamel. This pan, if rendered in a barenaked CI interior, would be fine, with the caveat of it's a little larger than most hobs, inviting some unevenness.

          I've take to using mine for large preps of lasagna.

          Used to be, in the good'ol days, it was common to find very shallow oval roasters (shallower than gratins or oval skillets), trays, really. The closest analogue I can point to from modern production is the "fajita pan", except sans handle. I'm a little surprised no maker has brought this shape back in modern times for roasting without aromatics.

          Any more Prima Matera to report?

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

          1. re: kaleokahu
            tanuki soup Dec 2, 2012 10:29 AM

            Hi K -- Thanks for the info. After responding to the OP's question, I realized that I also wanted a small roasting pan that I could take out of the oven and heat up on my induction cooktop to make some quick pan gravy. Since the LC is too big for my tiny Japanese oven anyway, I ordered a (magnetic) stainless steel broiling pan and a Granite Ware (enameled carbon steel) rectangular baking dish. Keeping my fingers crossed that they will work. -- TS

            PS. No more Prima Matera yet. I check Amazon every now and then, but it doesn't seem that De Buyer is coming out with anything new in the PM line.

      2. Chemicalkinetics Nov 30, 2012 09:23 PM

        < I found a brilliant roaster made by Ready Steady Cook with a lid which is brilliant for open roastin in the lid, closed roasting for chickens etc with the lid on, goes atraight on the hob for gravy BUT it is too big for weekday nights when I am just cooking for two>

        I see. So you already have a roasting pan which does exactly what you want, and now you want something smaller. Like Sid Post has said, you can consider a small braiser.

        Calpahlon has a smaller roasting pan. 14 inch instead of the typical 16 inch, so that it is smaller. It triply with stainless steel and aluminum layers. Most importantly, it is induction ready:

        "Gas, Electric, Halogen, Ceramic and Induction stove tops Oven and broiler safe"

        http://www.amazon.com/Calphalon-Tri-P...

        Exactly how small do you want yours?

        2 Replies
        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
          f
          featheronawire Dec 1, 2012 11:00 AM

          9" X 7" internal would be ideal so I can fit more than one on a shelf and easily fit 2 or 3 plus saucepans into the dishwasher afterwards. Thanks, Sally

          1. re: featheronawire
            Chemicalkinetics Dec 1, 2012 11:26 AM

            Oh you want dishwasher safe too. Ok. I was looking at this cast iron small baking pan 8" X 8". It will certainly be induction ready, but it is 100% NOT dishwasher safe.

            http://www.amazon.com/Old-Mountain-Seasoned-10163-Square/dp/B001AT23DC/ref=pd_sim_k_24

            Ok, let me get all these facts right (which will also help other posters too). You want:

            a) A small 9" X 7" baking rooster for oven
            b) and able to go on an induction cooktop
            c) and dishwasher safe
            anything else?

            Ok, I am thinking about aluminized steel pan. There are many, but I will just point out two examples. One is a Teflon coated aluminized steel square cake pan and the other one is not Teflon coated. They should both react to induction cooktop, and both are advertized to be dishwasher safe. Now, they both have a low temperature limit, so do not over heat on the stovetop:

            http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/usa-pan-goldtouch-nonstick-square-cake-pan/?pkey=ccake-pans&

            http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/usa-pan-traditional-finish-square-cake-pan/?pkey=ccake-pans&

            Here is a round (non-square pan) which is approximately your requested size. It is cast iron with enameled surface. So it will work well on induction stovetop and in oven, and it is dishwasher safe:

            http://www.amazon.com/Le-Creuset-Enameled-Cast-Iron-4-Inch/dp/B00005QFN5/ref=sr_1_12?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1354389566&sr=1-12&keywords=cast+iron+enameled+baking+pan

            http://www.amazon.com/Staub-130-16-23...

        2. Caroline1 Dec 1, 2012 11:49 AM

          Personally, I ADORE cast iron on induction, so with that in mind, what I think will work fine may not be what you think will work fine. Nevertheless, this seems like the answer to your prayers:
          http://tinyurl.com/d9ozqmd
          It will work as a Dutch oven in your oven or on your induction cooktop (or gas), it works fine to make gravy in. It's good for everything you talk about, but it is NOT good for storing food in after a meal. If you want to do that, then you need an enameled cast iron Dutch oven like this:
          http://tinyurl.com/bm2cf2t

          My experience with cast iron on induction is that it is more responsive (heats and cools rapidly) than any other induction-friendly cookware I have. If the 3.75qt enameled cast iron is too small, they have lots of sizes available on amazon.com, but do a search for "Dutch ovens," then check out the prices. Good luck!

          1 Reply
          1. re: Caroline1
            Caroline1 Dec 1, 2012 04:45 PM

            Oooops! I need to work on my "cut & paste" skills! Somehow the first paragraph never made it to my post, so here it is as it was intended. Sorry!
            ..................................................................................................................................................................

            Here's something that MAY be close to what you’re looking for:
            http://tinyurl.com/brz6grk
            but it may not be small enough. Rectangular cast iron cake pans seem to be hard to find. When I’ve run into problems like yours, it has turned out that just starting from scratch and going for what is made for the purposes I'm looking for works out in the end.

            Personally, I ADORE cast iron on induction, so with that in mind, what I think will work fine may not be what you think will work fine. Nevertheless, this seems like the answer to your prayers:
            http://tinyurl.com/d9ozqmd
            It will work as a Dutch oven in your oven or on your induction cooktop (or gas), it works fine to make gravy in. It's good for everything you talk about, but it is NOT good for storing food in after a meal. If you want to do that, then you need an enameled cast iron Dutch oven like this:
            http://tinyurl.com/bm2cf2t

            My experience with cast iron on induction is that it is more responsive (heats and cools rapidly) than any other induction-friendly cookware I have. If the 3.75qt enameled cast iron is too small, they have lots of sizes available on amazon.com, but do a search for "Dutch ovens," then check out the prices. Good luck!

          2. f
            featheronawire Dec 1, 2012 04:04 PM

            Thank you all for taking time to respond. I did try a little 8" square cast iron on but when it arrived 8" is the external dimension but it will come in useful for the perfect fried egg to fit on a slice of toast. lols
            I tried very heavy duty cake tins but even the heavest ones warped on the induction (they hadn't done so on my old gas hob.
            The little Le Cruset one sounds like it might be the answer to my prayers. They don't ship to England but I am sure I can get one over here.
            And the little dutch oven someone else came up with looks absolutely fabulous but yet again not shipped to the UK. But at least it has pointed me in another direction for my hunt.
            Just cooked a super roast chicken in the lidded Ready Steady Cook one, I add about half to 3/4 inch of stock into the pan before starting to cook and the chicken virtually steam cooks until the last 35 minutes with the lid off to brown the skin. Yummy.
            Traditionaly we are having roast beef and Yorkshire pudding tommow. The way I have been getting round the gravy problem is take the beef out of the roasting pan to rest, add boiling water to swirl it round and get as much of the caramelised juices as I can and then pouring into an induction pan. It gets most of it out but not all. sigh. I have cooked with gas all my life (or an Aga backed up by a gas cooker) and it might just mean changes in technique.

            2 Replies
            1. re: featheronawire
              Chemicalkinetics Dec 1, 2012 07:02 PM

              <very heavy duty cake tins but even the heavest ones warped on the induction (they hadn't done so on my old gas hob.>

              Unfortunately, induction cooking can heat up really quick and thus warping is not unusual. Good luck.

              1. re: featheronawire
                k
                khuzdul Dec 2, 2012 10:40 AM

                10" induction-compatible stainless steel ply fry pan would fine for both roasting small dishes and for use directly on the hob. Easy to find, won't warp on the hob, fits in the oven and dishwasher, multi-use. I roast chickens, quarter racks of lamb and small roasts in my 10" fry pan, then if needed, de-glaze and reduce the sauce on the hob.

              2. Robin Joy Dec 2, 2012 12:27 PM

                A cast iron gratin dish?

                They come in many sizes, the 0.65 litre ones are 10" long including handles and 6" wide:

                http://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_trk...

                1. m
                  mryguy Jan 19, 2013 10:03 AM

                  Hope I can add my question to your posting. new to this so bare with me. I have been frustrated trying to roast a chicken without breaking out the Big Turkey Roaster. Usually do 5 pounder and have tried a real cheap decorated roaster not sure of material, that did not work, Then my wife bought a Martha Stewart brand enameled pan (not sure what the metal
                  is but it is very light). it works a little better but the rack is almost at bottom of pan so not much air circulates around the bird and the bottom never gets done when top of bird is (and of course skin is soggy) so question is will a stainless steel pan be better saw one the other day half off. I want a pan with a rack that sits up so air circulates and a metal the conducts heat rapidly to brown up bird bottom like top. Have an ceramic topped electric stove and oven thank you all

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: mryguy
                    Caroline1 Jan 19, 2013 06:02 PM

                    My personal experience is that I don't find that much difference in any pan when it comes to roasting a chicken, so I suspect it may be more a matter of time and temperature than roasting pan. If your oven does convection in addition to standard thermal roasting, I find convection gives a bit crispier skin. You might also find that one of those vertical roaster stands gives better results. I picked one up on amazon.com for three or four bucks and free shipping. For regular roasting. I have one of those old fashioned racks I sit the chicken in that holds it up out of the drippings and works equally well on a cookie sheet or in my Le Creuset roaster. For crispier skin, do you oil or butter the skin of the bird before roasting? I usually give mine a nice rub with olive oil, then sprinkle on seasonings. Then it's a contest over who gets the lion's share of the crispy skin! I suspect oiling before roasting, and for even crispier skin, a really hot last five minutes or so in the oven will give you what you want. Good luck! And I wouldn't spend a lot of time or money on new roaster pans.

                    1. re: mryguy
                      kaleokahu Jan 19, 2013 06:17 PM

                      Hi, mryguy:

                      Do you have a cast iron skillet? IMO, these make great roasting pans for whole chickens.

                      You get the empty pan very hot on the stovetop, then add your oil, then sear the chicken's back for 3-5 minutes before popping it in the preheated oven for the roast--evens out the top/ bottom, done-ness and brown-ness. I do 475F for abut 40 minutes.

                      Aloha,
                      Kaleo

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