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Dry aging question and story.

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So I recently move to Baltimore and have been charged with Thanksgiving dinner for my family. We are not exactly the biggest turkey fans so I decided to do a standing rib roast. I wasn't having success in finding a good rib roast, one with good marbling, fat cap, and the right size, so I decided to order one from a shop in town that got good recommendations. I wanted leftovers so I ordered a full 7 rib roast, not trimmed. Well, I went to the counter today to pick it up and ask one of the butchers for my order. His eyes went wide and said, "Please, wait here!" He runs back and another guy comes out and introduces himself as the assistant meat manager and says he didn't recognize the name and asked if I shopped there often. I say no, but I heard good things and he goes on to go to say that if ever need anything at all, whether veal kidneys or a pheasant shot that morning or the toes of a golden sloth, just ask for him. It was about the time he was about to start kissing my hand that I started thinking, "don't people order things like this?" Well, I got my answer, when the first guy comes out with the biggest rib roast I've ever seen. It looked like they wrapped butcher paper around a side of cow.

22.5 lbs and $355 later, I seem to have gotten myself a rib roast. I'm not complaining. It's a really, really nice prime cut. I just wasn't expecting it to be that big. I was expecting 15 lbs maybe? Perhaps I should have specified how much I wanted it to weigh, but I didn't. It was only $15.99/lb, so not bad by that metric.

So my question is: I want to freeze some for another occasion. It's just simply too much, even for leftovers, for the number of people I'm having over. Do I cut it now and dry age then freeze? Any recommendations? Thanks!

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  1. So my question is: I want to freeze some for another occasion. It's just simply too much, even for leftovers, for the number of people I'm having over. Do I cut it now and dry age then freeze? Any recommendations? Thanks!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Have a look here on Wet Aging in a Vacuum Sealed Bag....which I did for 26/28 days.

    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8249...

    1. I curious as to how you ended up treating the meat. Any follow up story :)

      That said, I usually dry age a large roast, trim it, then slice it thick before freezing for future consumption. I only dry age for about 7 days, but the results have been great so far.

      4 Replies
      1. re: isthatabear

        I assume you are dry aging at home. How do you do this without a very specifically controlled environment?

        1. re: robt5265

          I decided to try dry aging after watching an episode of Good Eats (S05E04 Celebrity Roast). Alton Brown dry aged a roast in the coldest part of his fridge. I did the same while monitoring the temperature of that part of the fridge. The temperature fell within the recommended dry aging temperatures I read online.

          After the initial success,´╝ęcontinued to dry age in this fashion. I'm certainly no expert in this matter. I've just been following instructions from Good Eats and a bit of online research. So please correct me if you feel I'm doing something wrong.

          1. re: robt5265

            Just need a dedicated fridge set at the right temp and lots of clean towels. And time.

            1. re: ipsedixit

              it would need to be a second refrigerator, not used for everyday use, as opening it would change the temperature countless times a day

        2. If you have the room to age the whole piece, I'd opt to do that then trim after aging, cut and freeze the portion for the future.