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Gelatinous Stocks

Has anyone ever tried adding gelatin to stocks to mimic veal stock's mouthfeel/ thickening-through-redcution greatness?

I was thrown a curveball today when I couldn't find turkey wings for stock (which will eventually be gravy), so I bought a few pounds of necks. Not that I'm at a huge loss, but I've never made a stock 100% with necks, and I'm worried that they don't have the gracious amounts of collagen found in wings.

Just if anyone was wondering, I'd like the final product to be nappant, but not heavy and clingy like so many turkey gravys are. I'd like to do so completley by reduction, but I'm open to different gums (except xantham). I'd like to steer clear of starch as much as possible. I small knob of beurre manie will be fine, if worse comes to worst.

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  1. I use chicken feet for the gelatinous mouthfeel in stocks. They have an insane amount of collagen/gelatin and are dirt-cheap and easy to find in my neighborhood. That said, ATK uses gelatin in a number of their recipes to add body to sauces and stocks, so I'd say it's definitely worth a shot.

    1 Reply
    1. re: biondanonima

      +1 on chicken feet. Plus they add really good "chickeny" flavor compared with wings, in my opinion. Check out a Chinese meat counter if your usual chicken source doesn't have them. They do have the creepiness factor, but hey...

    2. I have used gelatin in beef stocks before and it works very well, so I can't see why it wouldn't work in a turkey stock.

      That said, I make stock with turkey necks and backs every year before Thanksgiving and every time it comes out gelatinous without any problems. So you should be fine with all necks.

      1. Add a couple TBS or so of apple cider vinagar when making the stock. It helps get all the yummy collogen out of the bones. I make it with just the carcasses and alwasy get a nice gelatinous stock.

          1. I have done it many times and it works great.