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Firm white fish

r
randyjl Nov 12, 2012 09:24 PM

I am just learning how to cook fish. I am still in my "white fish only" phase. I do like tilapia. I do not like catfish, even though I live in the heart of East Texas. If a recipe calls for firm white fish, what are my options? Is tilapia considered a firm fish?

  1. j
    jcattles Nov 16, 2012 10:54 AM

    I'm so glad someone posted about this. I was thinking about it the other day. I live in a very landlocked state (WY) and have never eaten much fish unless we are vacationing along coastal areas. I would love to eat/cook more fish and I know the only way to learn is to just do it, but I still hesitate. All the fish/seafood I can buy at my local grocery store has been frozen & shipped. Some looks good but others look waterlogged. I could probably get better quality in Denver, but that is a 2 hour drive, so we don't do it very frequently. We are also very limited to what our stores carry, Tilapia,Cod, Catfish (yuck), Salmon, Trout & Tuna are about it. They won't order in anything special so I'm very limited. It's rather frustrating!

    1. p
      Puffin3 Nov 16, 2012 05:53 AM

      Do you live near a fresh fish market? I mean really fresh not fresh because the fish was frozen on a boat and "we've thawed it out and put it on ice for your viewing pleasure" type fish market. LOL

      1. p
        Phoebe Nov 15, 2012 09:55 AM

        Love mahi mahi. Another good chose is rockfish (or striper).

        1. EricMM Nov 13, 2012 06:14 PM

          I would say that grouper is about the firmest fish you can get...also halibut.

          1. Ruthie789 Nov 13, 2012 11:01 AM

            Haddock is a mild firm fish which I use often. I don't like Tilapia either it is dry.
            Cod fish is also firm but it is quite flavorful and halibut mentionned can be quite expensive.

            1. n
              Nanzi Nov 13, 2012 09:28 AM

              Monkfish, also called poor mans lobster. Very mild and sweet. Yummy.

              1. mrsfury Nov 13, 2012 09:04 AM

                Redfish, halibut and mahi mahi are my favorites. Tilapia, not so much.

                1. h
                  Harters Nov 13, 2012 08:47 AM

                  Coley, pollock, cod, haddock, hake, halibut are the usual ones for "firm and white" to me.

                  I go for the first two for preference as they are not only cheaper but are generally regarded as sustainable catches.

                  1. Rodzilla Nov 13, 2012 12:39 AM

                    black cod, chilean sea bass, albacore, ono, escolar (read about this first), striped bass.

                    not quite white but I think you could handle it - mahi mahi

                    1. perk Nov 12, 2012 10:37 PM

                      Swordfish is a very meaty, and mild, fish. You might give that at ry.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: perk
                        ipsedixit Nov 13, 2012 07:44 AM

                        I'm not sure swordfish is "mild" in the way that cod or halibt or even tilapia would be.

                      2. t
                        twinsue Nov 12, 2012 09:52 PM

                        Tilapia is firmer than sole, not as "meaty" as cod or halibut. It is less expensive than either of those two, as is Basa, also called Swai. I use them in thai curries a lot. Be sure not to over cook because they will fall apart faster than firmer fish. But they can breaded and sauteed, broiled, baked .

                        2 Replies
                        1. re: twinsue
                          f
                          fourunder Nov 12, 2012 11:19 PM

                          basa = catfish...

                          1. re: fourunder
                            t
                            twinsue Nov 13, 2012 08:58 AM

                            Thanks for the info, I had no idea. I have now read up on it. I prefer it to American catfish. I find it milder, also it has slightly less fat than the American species. (fish fat may be good for you, but limiting fat is something I try to do)

                        2. ipsedixit Nov 12, 2012 09:43 PM

                          Cod or halibut - depending on your budget.

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