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Anyone read dated cookbooks?

p
pearlyriver Nov 10, 2012 07:54 AM

I came across a public-domain cookbook called "The Cook's Decameron: A Study in Taste, Containing Over Two Hundred Recipes For Italian Dishes" and it seems good. It covers all the building blocks of Italian cuisine and the recipes sound good, although exact measurement of ingredients is not provided. Does anyone read or use out-of-fashion cookbooks?

  1. juliejulez Nov 10, 2012 09:02 AM

    I like to read them, and then google what the ingredients are :)

    My brother actually gave me a little book that covers cooking in the 1500s... I really like reading those recipes, for things like mutton and bread-type stuff. I forget the name of it, I don't even know where it is (moved recently) but if I find it I'll let you know :)

    1. chefathome Nov 10, 2012 09:05 AM

      Yes! I've got some brilliant recipes dating back hundreds of years. Oh, and Escoffier books that call for interesting ingredients such as "cock's combs", swallow tongues, etc. They are a fascinating look into history because, after all, you can really learn a lot about a culture through its food. I am fascinated with ancient recipes!

      3 Replies
      1. re: chefathome
        p
        pearlyriver Nov 10, 2012 09:11 AM

        The cookbook I mentioned features New Century Sauce which is used as a base for fish sauce, sauce piquante, sauce for roast pork, masking cutlets etc. The author noted that this sauce could be purchased in XYZ street. What can the New Century Sauce be?

        1. re: pearlyriver
          j
          Jeri L Nov 10, 2012 11:32 AM

          Gosh I love the internet! It seems that Lazenby's was a purveyor of pickles and condiments. Best guess it it was a type of brown sauce. Perhaps this one?

          http://www.tablesauce.co.uk/chef-sauce/

          1. re: Jeri L
            p
            pearlyriver Nov 10, 2012 09:09 PM

            Gosh thank you so much. This site is crazy. Must be the brown sauce.

      2. mudcat Nov 10, 2012 10:31 AM

        I browse old second hand cookbooks at bookstore featuring used books. Many are the products of various clubs, churches and other organizations that put together the book to raise some funds. I also go to used book sales sponsored by local Libraries. Every once in a while I run across a gem (recipe or book) that I add to my collection.

        1. ipsedixit Nov 10, 2012 11:45 AM

          I read lots and lots of cookbooks, dated or not.

          Really enjoy doing it, in fact.

          I use them for inspiration, even though I never really follow the recipes.

          1. t
            tardigrade Nov 10, 2012 09:02 PM

            I currently have 5 different editions of the Fanny Farmer cookbook, ranging from c. 1920 to c. 2000. Besides reading them, I do use the older ones for some things, like pies. It's interesting to see the changes!

            I have a c. 1950 cookbook called "A Taste of Texas", published by Nieman-Marcus: it contains weird little tidbits, like military officials in Korea were not allowed to eat local foods (!), and tortillas were available in cans. Mexican food was still enough of a novelty among the book's readers that it had to explain some common ingredients. I have a book from the early 60s called "The Complete Book of Oriental Cooking", that suggests beer is an acceptable substitute for miso. OTOH, old cookbooks often have a lot of recipes for "variety" meets; my old Fanny Farmer books have a lot more varieties of salad dressings than even the best-stocked supermarket contains.

            I don't think I'm going to store my eggs in water glass any time soon, though.

            8 Replies
            1. re: tardigrade
              greygarious Nov 11, 2012 02:44 PM

              The eggs in water makes sense to me. Fresh eggs that have not been washed can be kept at room temp because they have a coating that makes them air-impermiable. Supermarket eggs do not have that natural coating. Submerging them probably prevents them from developing big air pockets, and spoiled eggs float. When refrigeration was not commonplace, this would have been sensible.

              1. re: greygarious
                t
                tardigrade Nov 11, 2012 07:48 PM

                "water glass" is actually sodium metasilicate: it was used to store eggs for several months. Apparantly (I'm a city gal), hens lay more at certain times of the year. Otherwise, eggs fresh from the hen or market were kept at room temperature (or in as cool a spot as available). One of the unspoken assumptions in my older cookbooks is that the housewife will shop several times a week, which my grandmothers certainly did.

              2. re: tardigrade
                jen kalb Nov 11, 2012 07:34 PM

                I remember my Mom using canned tortillas to make enchiladas in the 60s (she does not remember this herself.), along with canned enchilada sauce, etc.

                1. re: tardigrade
                  Will Owen Nov 13, 2012 02:34 PM

                  tardigrade, that Nieman-Marcus book is a good collectors' item, partly because (if it's the one I'm thinking of) it was written by their food director at the time, Helen Corbett, who went on to write quite a few more cookbooks, all good. The Mexican recipes got a lot more authentic as people's comfort zones expanded and the tortillas came out of the cans!

                  1. re: tardigrade
                    c
                    calliope_nh Nov 13, 2012 07:26 PM

                    I love tardigrades. Cute little things.
                    I like reading depression era and ration stamps recipe booklets.

                    1. re: calliope_nh
                      j
                      jvanderh Nov 15, 2012 09:04 PM

                      Where do you find 'em? Is there good stuff, or do you just read for interest?

                      1. re: jvanderh
                        t
                        tardigrade May 24, 2013 08:32 PM

                        Tardigrades? Damp, mossy places usually, I think.

                        The cookbooks - mainly by being old enough to have bought them new :) Or library sales, used book stores.

                        1. re: tardigrade
                          kimeats Jun 11, 2013 12:24 PM

                          I collect these cookbooks as well. Always learn something new from them.

                  2. hill food Nov 10, 2012 09:14 PM

                    LOVE old cookbooks. if no other reason to see how people ate. found my grandma's notes last year. good lord the amount of sugar, eggs and butter...

                    1. Bacardi1 Nov 11, 2012 03:06 PM

                      As a cookbook collector, I have hundreds of cookbooks - many of which are early first editions of decade's old volumes. And yes, I do use them occasionally, although almost always do some adapting to conform to current tastes.

                      1. PotatoHouse Nov 11, 2012 05:54 PM

                        Around half of my rather extensive cookbook collection are classic cookbooks (1920-1970).

                        1. Ruthie789 Nov 11, 2012 06:55 PM

                          Absolutely, I seek them out and buy them at tag sales and thrift shops. I collect both English and French cookbooks.

                          1. jill kibler Nov 11, 2012 07:34 PM

                            Yes, The Settlement Cookbook has a great section on cooking for invalids.The Babka Publishing Company published a "Favorite Recipe" cook book to advertise the publications it really wanted to sell listing antique markets. And I just found Prudence Penny cookbooks-a created cook from the San Francisco Examiner!

                            Fun!

                            1. meatn3 Nov 12, 2012 09:04 AM

                              I'm much more interested in older cookbooks. Each one is a little time capsule and offers a window into a specific time and place. I really enjoy finding a cooks notations marked in the book too. Often the book will tend to open to the page with the past cooks favorite recipe - I always feel that's a good place to start cooking from!

                              Older books remind us of the awareness past cooks had of the relationship between the kitchen and good health. The sections dealing with recipes to tempt an invalids appetite and directions for making and applying poultices bring that aspect clearly to focus.

                              I also love cookbooks which instructed how to cook with new fangled inventions. I have several early books on refrigerator dishes and making the most of your freezer. The refrigerator books feature aspics heavily and focus on foods for afternoon bridge parties. One of my freezer books has an odd fixation on whale meat - strangely written by a St. Louis woman.

                              4 Replies
                              1. re: meatn3
                                hill food Nov 12, 2012 03:07 PM

                                "a St. Louis woman" - would that be Mrs. Rombauer? I found out last year a friend is related to her somehow.

                                1. re: meatn3
                                  j
                                  janmcbaker Nov 14, 2012 09:53 AM

                                  Writing of 'new fangled inventions' made me think of a cookbook I got once at a thrift store. The recipes all centered on the theme of using 'YOUR ELECTRIC KNIFE.'

                                  1. re: janmcbaker
                                    chefathome Nov 14, 2012 09:55 AM

                                    Too funny! It must make for a humorous and unique read. It is amazing what one can learn, even from books like this.

                                    1. re: janmcbaker
                                      meatn3 Nov 14, 2012 12:58 PM

                                      I haven't run across that one. Was the focus big roasted things or did they teach you how to carve watermelons into baskets or some such thing?

                                  2. meatn3 Nov 12, 2012 06:09 PM

                                    The book is "Making the Most of Your Food Freezer" by Marie Armstrong Essipoff, copyright 1951.

                                    1. j
                                      JJS360 Nov 12, 2012 10:51 PM

                                      For you antico-culinaire-bibliophiles out the in Chowtown, have you perused Anne Willan's 'The Cookbook Library'? It documents the history of the cookbook in the Western world over the last four centuries. It is tediously detailed, but thrilling all the same. Like Chaucer meets Escoffier. I saw her speak recently at the Culinary Historians of Southern California.

                                      2 Replies
                                      1. re: JJS360
                                        hill food Nov 13, 2012 01:30 AM

                                        looks cool, link bookmarked.
                                        http://www.ucpress.edu/book.php?isbn=...

                                        no I didn't link the obvious commercial links

                                        1. re: JJS360
                                          chefathome Nov 13, 2012 06:17 AM

                                          Lucky you! I agree that it is absolutely thrilling to read.

                                        2. s
                                          sueatmo Nov 13, 2012 02:22 PM

                                          I have a few regional paper bound cookbooks, and recently I could not stop myself from buying a very old book of recipes which had obviously been duplicated on a mimeograph or ditto machine and assembled with brads. Under the circumstances, the organization was very good. I loved the period look of it, but the recipes were so dated nutritionally! I don't think I could find anything I would want to try.

                                          At any rate the book is a treasure, but not of usable recipes. Not for me, at any rate.

                                          A little book I bought early in my marriage in central Illinois must have 15 variations of Chocolate Sheet cake! That must have been the go to dessert there in the 'seventies.

                                          4 Replies
                                          1. re: sueatmo
                                            Will Owen Nov 13, 2012 02:48 PM

                                            I love old church-lady or service-club cookbooks, especially the spiral- or comb-bound ones, and can't help getting just about every one I come across, especially at rural antique malls in Tennessee and Kentucky. At the other end are the Junior League cookbooks, same idea but much fancier presentations.

                                            The ones I will buy no matter what are those with inclusions, especially handwritten ones. My copy of Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings's "Cross Creek Cookery" is a 1942 first edition that I got cheap because it was "missing its dust-jacket." (What the idiot seller missed is that wartime books didn't have any, in order to save paper!) But the best part to me was a good collection of hand-pencilled recipes, others cut from newspapers, and an interesting if cryptic message on a plain postcard. Real stuff from real people, now long gone.

                                            1. re: Will Owen
                                              t
                                              tardigrade Nov 13, 2012 06:58 PM

                                              My husband's high school girlfriend works for one of the publishers of these "church lady" books: she does the designs and layouts, then the company adds a bunch of stock pages on measurements, techniques, etc. I have one of them, put together by my mother's church group: it has some great recipes for traditional Polish dishes, like pierogi, and a lot of real dreck (57 variations on Jell-o salads, anyone? With a regional Cool-Whip knockoff?), but as a snapshot of the time and place it's fun to read.

                                              1. re: Will Owen
                                                s
                                                sueatmo Nov 14, 2012 09:53 AM

                                                What a good idea--looking for notes from the original user. I used to buy the comb bound books as low cost souvenirs in our modest travels. The book I bought in the Smokies had so many recipes for corn bread!

                                                I recently had an opportunity to peruse a company cook book, recently produced. I couldn't use any of the recipes. Too fatty, too carby, to reliant on convenience foods. I could have picked it up and taken it home, but I passed. My former employer's staff association produced a cookbook, which I purchased a number of years ago. I could use only a few of the recipes. The problem is the same.

                                                I suppose the best examples of these are the older ones, which did not rely so much on convenience foods. But my example from about 1960, didn't have any usable recipes either. I have to regard it as an interesting artifact only.

                                                1. re: Will Owen
                                                  q
                                                  Querencia May 29, 2013 12:47 PM

                                                  Yes, I buy these when I find them at yard sales and thrift shops. In the Chicago area the ones coming from Slavic churches have great pastry recipes. A lot of the books showing up now on the secondary market were compiled in the 1970s when more women were at home baking full-time; now, not so much and even Chicago's neighborhood bakeries have largely disappeared except in a few parts of the city. Whoever said (on this board) that old cookbooks are time capsules really nailed it. Sociology and genealogy get all intertwined with cooking.

                                              2. m
                                                MelMM Nov 13, 2012 02:55 PM

                                                You know, there is a line between "dated" and "historic", and I'm not sure where it is. I have cookbooks from throughout the 20th century, and several from the 19th century and earlier (the older ones being in facsimile). I find the old cookbooks very useful for giving context to certain recipes. Many younger cooks like to assume that we are living in the best of all times, food-wise, but a study of old cookbooks will make you more circumspect. There is a purity to old recipes. Cakes are a good example. As you go back through time, the flour is less refined, and has fewer additives. Go far enough back and there are no chemical leaveners in cakes - that is, no baking soda or baking powder. These cakes are technique-driven. The leavening comes from the cook whipping in air, in the egg whites, and in the butter. There are also more alternative flours used than one would suspect. Flours that later disappeared from our repertoire and are only recently starting to reappear. I guess I would say that reading some older/historic cookbooks, however you want to define that, is an essential part of being a well-educated cook. Many times when I see an old recipe published these days, I'll see comments like, "surely they wouldn't have had {insert ingredient X here} back then". But if you are familiar with these recipes, you will know better.

                                                3 Replies
                                                1. re: MelMM
                                                  chefathome Nov 13, 2012 03:03 PM

                                                  This is exactly what was just going through my mind - my post was mainly about historic books that are written by contemporary authors about the foods of ancient Middle East, for example. But many of my books do contain actual recipes re a particular era which I find absolutely fascinating. My books range from ancient food history through the Middle Ages through Medieval England to Victorian London with amazing (and often humorous "recipes").

                                                  Some of my cookbooks are dated, such as "Food that Really Schmecks" and the books I received as a very young six-year-old cook which would be 30+ years old now. Those are interesting to flip through ever now and then, too.

                                                  1. re: chefathome
                                                    m
                                                    MelMM Nov 13, 2012 04:36 PM

                                                    I agree, the "dated" ones can be fun too. I'm not sure where I draw the line. Maybe 1950 or so? I don't know, and the truth is, it probably depends upon the cookbook itself. Heck, there are cookbooks from 5 years ago that would probably qualify as "dated". And while my focus is early American cookbooks, I also have, like you, some European volumes, and some histories that delve into other parts of the world. It's all very fascinating to me and I like to see how the dishes relate to each other.

                                                    Truth is, I'm pretty happy to look through just about any cookbook, from any time. They are such fascinating documents our our culture.

                                                    1. re: MelMM
                                                      Will Owen Nov 13, 2012 05:19 PM

                                                      I've got some late 1800s/early 1900s cookbooks with recipes that were old-fashioned at the time, seemingly written by elderly cooks with time on their hand, very much like some of the church-lady cookbooks you can find now. A lot of the recipes are simply written narratives, telling you what to throw in when and what to do next, and what kind of fire you should do it on or in. Just for grins I did a batch of gingersnaps according to one of those, changing only Crisco for lard because that's what I had, and they were pretty damn good.

                                                      Used to be the writers assumed their readers were used to dealing with vessels over fires, wood stoves or coal, and sufficiently familiar with all the usual ingredients that no further explanation was necessary. Escoffier's recipes are like that; Elizabeth David got flak for a somewhat similar lack of hand-holding. Following those to make something edible is good exercise, though I'll admit that after a successful attempt I'll go write it down in the currently standard format!

                                                2. nokitchen Nov 13, 2012 07:40 PM

                                                  For Chowhounds interested in such things, there's a lady around the block from me who runs a bookstore selling nothing but used cookbooks. Classics, lost cookbooks, books from and about all eras and cuisines, whatever. For people who live in NYC or are visiting she's on 10th St. between 7th and Waverly. For others, here's her website: http://bonnieslotnickcookbooks.com/ Give her a call with a title or even just an idea of what you're looking for and she'll be happy to help you out.

                                                  After her phone is de-Sandyfied, of course.

                                                  1. h
                                                    hankstramm Nov 13, 2012 07:44 PM

                                                    I have an old Bookbinders cookbook (a famous Philadelphia restaurant). I found the cookbook at Green Apple in SF. It has quite dated recipes but ones that I remember family members eating as a child (it was a very special occasion to go there). Snapper soup, crab imperial and many others. Haven't cooked any yet. Maybe someday.

                                                    2 Replies
                                                    1. re: hankstramm
                                                      Bacardi1 Nov 14, 2012 07:03 AM

                                                      Did you know that Bookbinder still puts out its "Snapper Soup" in cans? Also all of it's other seafood soups. And Pepperpot as well.

                                                      1. re: Bacardi1
                                                        Will Owen Apr 23, 2013 05:58 PM

                                                        I snapped up a Bookbinder's cookbook just because I wanted their Pepperpot recipe. And now that I have a freezer (I'm the sole carnivore in the house, except for the cats) and live near a Latino market - for the tripe! - I'll make a batch. Probably better wait until Mrs. O is out of town, because it will smell the place up a bit …

                                                    2. Antilope Nov 13, 2012 08:32 PM

                                                      Old Cook Books (late 1800's & early 1900's), links to free online e-copies at Archive.org
                                                      http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/800296

                                                      2 Replies
                                                      1. re: Antilope
                                                        hill food Nov 13, 2012 09:07 PM

                                                        oh wow. thanks. bookmarked.

                                                        I love when other people bother to pursue my idle whimsies for me. still gives me a lot to wade through, but it's a start.

                                                        1. re: Antilope
                                                          j
                                                          jvanderh Nov 15, 2012 09:04 PM

                                                          Oooooh. Thank you.

                                                        2. Tehama Nov 14, 2012 04:32 AM

                                                          I have a few of my Grandmother's cookbooks that I would say range from 1925 - 1955. The one sposnored by Crisco CRACKS ME UP. Apparently Crisco is a miracle ingredient and makes anything and and everything better and actaully SHOULD go into everything!

                                                          There is another one broken down into the servantless house and the home with a servant. You can get extra fancy and have plenty of time for a martini if you have a maid. Aaahhh - the life of having an-home daily maid.

                                                          2 Replies
                                                          1. re: Tehama
                                                            Antilope Nov 14, 2012 09:07 PM

                                                            Here's a link to online e-copies you can either read online or download in various formats (for free) at Archive.org.

                                                            The story of Crisco (1914).
                                                            http://archive.org/details/storyofcrisco00neil

                                                            The story of Crisco (1920).
                                                            http://archive.org/details/cu31924089587624

                                                            The story of Crisco (1921).
                                                            http://archive.org/details/storyofcrisco00neilrich

                                                            Mazola_Perfect_For_Deep_Frying (1925).
                                                            http://archive.org/details/Mazola_Perfect_For_Deep_Frying

                                                            Aunt Jenny's Favorite Recipes (Spry shortening) about 1940.
                                                            http://archive.org/details/auntjennys...

                                                            1. re: Antilope
                                                              Tehama Nov 15, 2012 04:46 AM

                                                              Ohhh - that's fabulous! Thank you so much for sharing that! hahaha!

                                                          2. mudcat Nov 14, 2012 05:51 AM

                                                            I frequently browse and use The New Orleans Restaurant Cookbook by Diedre Stanforth (1967). A little dated perhaps and some may consider it out- of -fashion but I view it as historic. It features the recipes of Antoine's, Arnaud's, Brennan's, Galatoires, Corrine Dunbar's, the Cafibbean Room of the Pontchartrain Hotel, Commander's Palace, Maison's Beach House, and the history of those establishments.

                                                            1. h
                                                              Harters Nov 14, 2012 07:42 AM

                                                              We have a couple or so dating to the 1950s but nothing earlier. They were regarded as classics of their time (and for some years after) but they seem horribly old-fashioned now. How tastes have changed

                                                              1. b
                                                                buzzardbreath Nov 14, 2012 07:56 AM

                                                                I love them! The older generation in my family is delighted to know this because they now have someone to give their "classics" when they clean their bookshelves, much to my husband's dismay.

                                                                Two of my very favorite cookbooks are "The Christmas Cookie Book" and "The Holiday Candy Book" by Virginia Pasley, circa 1940's. My grandma's sister gave them to me in the early 70's, when I was in grade school. It's her fault I love old cookbooks! ;-)

                                                                1. g
                                                                  Georgia Strait Nov 14, 2012 08:28 AM

                                                                  great topic
                                                                  thank you OP PearlyRiver!

                                                                  someone above mentioned Helen Corbitt - from NY - went to Texas - the rest you can read here

                                                                  i still make her famous Neiman Marcus poppy seed dressing - it is a Thxgiving / xmas "must"

                                                                  http://www.texascooking.com/features/...

                                                                  i learned from friends in the USA - and it became one of our traditions in our household and extended family in West Canada

                                                                  =========
                                                                  and to answer the original post - YES, i am crazy about the graphic design etc in old cookbooks - i am sentimental about others and - as some other posters have pointed out - the pencil notes, the book marks - all that stuff

                                                                  i like the 50's to 70's (the onset of crock pots and cake mix doctoring
                                                                  )i like the Stillmeadow cookbox (the dustjacket photo)
                                                                  Better homes and gardens - the pink-red gingham cover and the chapter divider photos - has to be the circa 1960 edition with the dads barbecuing - and the pie = apple and there is a woman somewhere in there with a blue shirtwaist dress

                                                                  good old Joy of cooking

                                                                  i have some 1950's cookbooks for children - that were given to me as hand-me-downs after the older cousins had used them and fingerprinted them etc etc

                                                                  i have one from a rummage store called "I hate to cook book" - by Peg Bracken - she is on wiki or blogs - really great and some adaptable ideas for modern times (sounds like another book promo doesn't it)

                                                                  so it pains me to see cookbooks in rummage and i think there are many at this time cuz the elder ladies have moved out of home or died and all their 60's to 1980's treasures are in the rummage

                                                                  this is the end of an era - what does your average target-shopping / frozen or take-out QMR (quick meal replacement) family have to offer? Not many cookbooks that have pages that stick together.

                                                                  ps - the only thing - i can't fit the metropolitan life height weight tables - those men and women were SKINNY (and smokers? ; ) ==== i say that cuz i am big fan of vintage movies and so many "elegant" smokers and imbibers - but rarely does one see anyone eat in those movies!

                                                                  1 Reply
                                                                  1. re: Georgia Strait
                                                                    l
                                                                    LeJazzHot May 24, 2013 10:04 AM

                                                                    I love Peg Bracken, every time I clean out my bookshelves, that paperback gets another read!

                                                                    I can't say that I've ever made a recipe from it, but I found some great entertaining tips there. Two best are set the table and then worry about dusting and such, and to have back to back dinner parties. I love the back to back party idea so much, I've used it for many many years. Especially since I'm a slacker of a housekeeper.

                                                                    Her I Hate to Housekeep is also a classic.

                                                                  2. s
                                                                    sueatmo Nov 14, 2012 09:48 AM

                                                                    I had forgotten this. My mother had an old wartime cookbook done by the Culinary Institute. It was falling apart, but I got and read it. I learned a lot, about several things. I do remember that the fat which separates from the stock overnight in a cool room actually protects the stock (for a while) from spoilage. Also, for good hot cocoa, you have to cook the cocoa because it is a starch. I don't make hot cocoa from scratch anymore, but I do allow time out of the pot for the broth and fat to separate before chilling in the fridge.

                                                                    I think I got a really good pancake recipe out of that old book as well. This would have been in the 'seventies when I was newly married.

                                                                    1. jpr54_1 Nov 14, 2012 01:12 PM

                                                                      I have n old cookbook written in yiddish for American Jewish Women from the turn of the century

                                                                      1. t
                                                                        Tara57 Nov 14, 2012 05:20 PM

                                                                        A treasure of historic cookbooks are here:
                                                                        http://digital.lib.msu.edu/projects/cookbooks/

                                                                        and here:
                                                                        http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Cookery...

                                                                        1. q
                                                                          Querencia Nov 14, 2012 07:08 PM

                                                                          1) I use three different editions of The Joy of Cooking because they aren't the same and my favorite recipes are distributed among them all. 2) I collect at yard sales and thrift shops the cookbooks put together by church members and bound on a spiral, sold as fund-raisers, and these are usually 20-40 years "out of date" but are especially good for baking recipes as women then mostly stayed at home and had more time to bake. If the church has an ethnic bent the books are treasures of ethnic recipes. 3) One of my favorite vegetable recipes came from an 1858 book---to cooked carrots add butter, brown sugar, and curry powder.

                                                                          I can't imagine NOT consulting out-of-fashion cookbooks.

                                                                          2 Replies
                                                                          1. re: Querencia
                                                                            hill food Nov 14, 2012 07:41 PM

                                                                            I do like to compare the various editions of 'Joy' just to see how the editors have perceived our tastes to have evolved.

                                                                            once I had a cookbook from 1918 instructing how to cook healthy under wartime rations. it was actually one of the healthier of the old-school books I've seen.

                                                                            1. re: Querencia
                                                                              s
                                                                              sueatmo Nov 14, 2012 08:16 PM

                                                                              I also have and use three editions of JOC.

                                                                            2. d
                                                                              donnabenson Nov 14, 2012 07:52 PM

                                                                              I have the original 1896 Fannie Farmer Boston Cooking School Cook Book . It was republished in 1997 by Dover Publications in Mineola, NY. It is a real hoot ! It has unusual recipes Like Apple Water and Brown bread ice cream. It has recepies to be prepared for the ssick and even how you should handle that person! It makes for some very entertaining reading..

                                                                              1 Reply
                                                                              1. re: donnabenson
                                                                                Antilope Nov 14, 2012 08:41 PM

                                                                                Here are links to online e-copies of various editions of Fannie Farmer's Boston Cooking-School Cook Book that you can either read online or download in various formats (for free) at Archive.org:

                                                                                The Boston Cooking-school Cook Book (1896).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/bostoncookingsc00collgoog

                                                                                The Boston cooking-school cook book (1905).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/bostoncookingsc01farmgoog

                                                                                The Boston cooking-school cook book (1910).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/bostoncookingsc00farmgoog

                                                                                The Boston Cooking-school Cook Book (1911).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/bostoncookingsc00farmgoog

                                                                                The Boston cooking-school cook book (1911, c1906).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/bostoncookingsch00farmrich

                                                                                The Boston cooking-school cook book (1913).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/cu31924087257873

                                                                                The Boston cooking-school cook book ([c1918]).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/cookingscholbost00farmrich

                                                                                The White House cook book; a comprehensive cyclopedia of information for the home .. (1913 [c1887]).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/whitehousecookbo00gillrich

                                                                                Sunset all-western cook book (1933).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/sunsetallwestern00callrich

                                                                                Meals on wheels; a cook book for trailers and kitchenettes ([c1937]).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/mealsonwheelscoo00willrich

                                                                                Good housekeeping's book of recipes and household discoveries (1920).
                                                                                http://archive.org/details/goodhousekeep2000good

                                                                                American Cookery - online e-cookbooks at Archive.org
                                                                                http://archive.org/search.php?query=s...

                                                                              2. mamachef Nov 14, 2012 08:15 PM

                                                                                I have them, I collect them, I love them, I learn a great deal from them, and......
                                                                                occasionally i even cook from them,

                                                                                1. Antilope Nov 14, 2012 08:49 PM

                                                                                  The cook's Decameron : a study in taste, containing over two hundred recipes for Italian dishes (1920).
                                                                                  Here's a link to online e-copies you can either read online or download in various formats (for free) at Archive.org.

                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cu31924000...

                                                                                  2 Replies
                                                                                  1. re: Antilope
                                                                                    m
                                                                                    miriamjo Nov 14, 2012 09:35 PM

                                                                                    13 years ago when we turned our summer cottage into a year-round home, I requested an entire wall in the kitchen be bookshelves for my cookbook collection. The builder thought I was crazy until he came by after we moved in. I'm only sorry that I gave my original Betty Crocker to a daughter, tho I guess I could get a new one. Still have my Fanny 'Farmer and James Beard from the 1950's. I think it is a fairly harmless addiction!

                                                                                    1. re: miriamjo
                                                                                      Will Owen Apr 23, 2013 06:06 PM

                                                                                      Once you're over 500 it's no longer harmless, especially if there's no place left to put bookshelves!

                                                                                  2. Ruthie789 Nov 15, 2012 02:10 AM

                                                                                    Although not an old cookbook The Ministry of Food gives history on food consumption and cookery during World War 2 in England. You have food history and recipes link below:
                                                                                    http://transitionculture.org/2010/05/...

                                                                                    2 Replies
                                                                                    1. re: Ruthie789
                                                                                      h
                                                                                      Harters Nov 15, 2012 06:07 AM

                                                                                      Going back to the previous conflict, I've just bought a circa 1916 booklet "Simple Cookery for the People". Food rationing had not yet started then but times were difficult with the men being away in the army and unable to bring in an income - the book focuses on economical dishes.

                                                                                      1. re: Harters
                                                                                        Ruthie789 Nov 15, 2012 07:45 AM

                                                                                        What is inspiring about these books is how relevant they are to today. The Ministry of Food reminds me of the eat local movement.

                                                                                    2. f
                                                                                      FrankJBN Nov 15, 2012 08:11 AM

                                                                                      All of my cookbooks are dated (except for the cooking with diabetes, heart disease etc. which are recent gifts from well meaning friends).

                                                                                      Was just in my crumbling copy of "... French Cooking" by Julia Child and was amused as she extolled the health virtues of organ meats. Paraphrasing 'gives you good red blood.'

                                                                                      1. Antilope Nov 15, 2012 08:40 AM

                                                                                        Here's a link to online e-copies you can either read online or download in various formats (for free) at Archive.org.

                                                                                        The story of Crisco (1914).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/storyofcrisco00neil

                                                                                        The story of Crisco (1920).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/cu31924089587624

                                                                                        The story of Crisco (1921).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/storyofcrisco00neilrich

                                                                                        Mazola_Perfect_For_Deep_Frying (1925).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/Mazola_Perfect_For_Deep_Frying

                                                                                        Aunt Jenny's Favorite Recipes (Spry shortening) about 1940.
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/auntjennysfavori00camb

                                                                                        Snowdrift secrets the perfect shortening for all cooking (c1913).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/snowdriftsecrets00rorerich

                                                                                        The Calumet cook book (1916).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/calumetcookbook00calu

                                                                                        My favorite receipt, Royal Baking Powder Company (1909).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/myfavoritereceip00roya

                                                                                        The Royal Baker and Pastry Cook (1895).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/royalbakerpastry00roya

                                                                                        The_Fleischmann_Treasurey_Of_Yeast_Baking_ (1962).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/The_Fleischmann_Treasurey_Of_Yeast_Baking_

                                                                                        Ryzon baking book, baking powder (1917).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/cu31924089597227

                                                                                        60_Prize_Winning_Formulas_Pillsbury_US_Bake_Off_BK850_ (1950).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/60_Prize_Winning_Formulas_Pillbury_US_Bake_Off_BK850_

                                                                                        Betty Crocker's Cookbook for boys & girls (1975).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/bettycrockerscoo00croc

                                                                                        GOLD MEDAL FLOUR COOK BOOK (1910).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/goldmedalflour00washrich

                                                                                        Velveeta Recipe Booklet
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/VelveetaRecipeBooklet8

                                                                                        Pet Milk Recipe book
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/PetMilkRecipeBook

                                                                                        Armour and company Recipe leaflet
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/recipeleafletsco00armo

                                                                                        The World's fair recipe book (1893).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/worldsfairrecipe00land

                                                                                        All-Canadian recipe book. (2012).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/allcanadianrecip11698cana

                                                                                        Good Housekeeping's Book of Recipes (1920).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/goodhousekeep2000good

                                                                                        Prego Spaghetti sauce recipes
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/PregoSpaghettiSauceRecipes

                                                                                        Vermont_Maid_Syrup_Recipes (1932
                                                                                        )http://archive.org/details/Vermont_Maid_Syrup

                                                                                        Cooking With Dr Pepper
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/CookingWithDrPepper

                                                                                        Recipes_For_Eatmor_Fresh_Cranberries_ (1953
                                                                                        )http://archive.org/details/Recipes_For_Eatmor_Fresh_Cranberries_

                                                                                        Sunset all-western cook book (1933).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/sunsetallwestern00callrich

                                                                                        Meals on wheels; a cook book for trailers and kitchenettes (c1937).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/mealsonwheelscoo00willrich

                                                                                        Hershey's Catalog of chocolate and cocoa products (early 1900's?).
                                                                                        http://archive.org/details/catalogofc...

                                                                                        2 Replies
                                                                                        1. re: Antilope
                                                                                          p
                                                                                          pattycats Jun 7, 2013 10:18 PM

                                                                                          Thanks for posting this list. I enjoyed browsing!

                                                                                          1. re: Antilope
                                                                                            kimeats Jun 11, 2013 12:26 PM

                                                                                            great list thanks

                                                                                          2. hannaone Apr 21, 2013 04:02 PM

                                                                                            For those interested in early cookbooks I found some interesting ones on the Gutenburg site.

                                                                                            The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887)
                                                                                            http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/13923

                                                                                            Miss Parloa's New Cookbook (18??
                                                                                            )http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/6745

                                                                                            1. LMAshton Apr 24, 2013 03:34 AM

                                                                                              My two favourite Sri Lankan cookbooks (the husband is Sri Lankan, so this is important, you know?) were both published in the late 1960s. Which also means they're completely authentic and not at all westernized, which is important.

                                                                                              It's kinda fun learning how much is a bottle of this or a dessert spoon of that, or what billings is or one of the other odd-to-me ingredients I've come across. Oh, and sweet cumin, which, if I recall correctly, is another name for fennel. And when they say saffron, they're actually referring to turmeric...

                                                                                              I had to have help to figure things out, of course. :)

                                                                                              1. l
                                                                                                LeJazzHot May 24, 2013 09:55 AM

                                                                                                My mother's American Woman's Cookbook from the forties still is used by me. Bread is not just recipes, but techniques and science, and a huge host of recipes for vegetables which can be grown locally, although I now shorten many of the cooking times. It was pretty much the only cookbook in my house (a house without a ton of books for a voracious child reader), and where I began my baking @ 10 years old. Still follow to the letter some of the candy recipes.

                                                                                                1. Ruthie789 May 29, 2013 10:48 AM

                                                                                                  I recently purchased The Best of McCall's magazine cookbook. Pictures are dated but it is full of recipes.

                                                                                                  1. q
                                                                                                    Querencia May 29, 2013 12:34 PM

                                                                                                    I am an old cookbook junkie. I have Mrs Beeton (1859) and Marion Harland (1906)---mostly they read as a curiosity (we no longer eat tripe, eels, or frog legs for breakfast). But my favorite recipe for carrots came from "Inquire Within" (1858)---heat up cooked carrots with brown sugar, butter, and curry powder.

                                                                                                    Someone in this thread commented on the past popularity of aspics. In a history of convenience foods I read that aspics and jello salads/desserts were a status thing in the 1920s and 1930s because you had to have an electric "Frigidaire" in order to set them and as these new appliances were expensive, not everyone could afford them. So you showed off for your bridge club etc with a jelled dish.

                                                                                                    1 Reply
                                                                                                    1. re: Querencia
                                                                                                      Ruthie789 May 29, 2013 05:43 PM

                                                                                                      That is very interesting about aspics never thought of them as a status dish.

                                                                                                    2. Ruthie789 Jun 5, 2013 04:26 AM

                                                                                                      Apparently old cookbooks are making a comeback here is a link for review:
                                                                                                      http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/f...

                                                                                                      2 Replies
                                                                                                      1. re: Ruthie789
                                                                                                        pinehurst Jun 5, 2013 05:28 AM

                                                                                                        Cool link, Ruthie. Thank you!

                                                                                                        I have all of my mom and grandmother's old cookbooks, along with some precious handwritten recipes and cooking notes. I love them. Most folks (outside the 'Hound Pack) would think a spider in cooking was an unwanted tiny visitor, but some books have whole sections that say "get your spider..."

                                                                                                        1. re: pinehurst
                                                                                                          Ruthie789 Jun 5, 2013 03:47 PM

                                                                                                          I love old books, especially handwritten recipes, fascinating.

                                                                                                      2. MGZ Jun 5, 2013 06:13 AM

                                                                                                        Many years ago, I did the hard labor of helping move my Grandmother's stuff out of her house so she could move to a place closer to my Dad (I'm the guy in the family with the truck). During the process I salvaged a few things that she didn't want. Most were my Grandfather's scrapbooks and flight logs, but one was a 1930 cookbook. I perused the latter a few times and chuckled about the squirrel recipes - especially the fried one.

                                                                                                        Now, Dad lost his wife just about a year ago. In October, that whore Sandy nearly wrecked the house he lives in and that I grew up in. So, we have been hostin' him for dinner around once a month or so.

                                                                                                        For some reason, the topic of old cookbooks came up when we were treatin' him to some oak grilled prime rib last week.

                                                                                                        "You know what, Pop, I have one of Gam's old books. It's really funny 'cause you can see the notes she made and the pages she dog eared."

                                                                                                        My wife went and got it for him. He sat. Had a sip of wine. And, was lost - completely lost.

                                                                                                        We were respectfully patient, but when a coupla tears came to his eyes, my beautiful wife gave him a big hug. It was sad, but it was also really solid.

                                                                                                        Mrs. Z gave him a thing of post it notes to attach to any page he wanted and assured him that "Matt will make any recipe you want for our dinners, OK? I think that could be fun."

                                                                                                        We drank more wine. Shared stories about his Mom's cooking and how she taught me. After he left, I laughed my ass off that he put one of the post it notes on the fried squirrel page.

                                                                                                        3 Replies
                                                                                                        1. re: MGZ
                                                                                                          pinehurst Jun 5, 2013 06:23 AM

                                                                                                          You're a good son, MGZ. And this a great story that you shared.
                                                                                                          PS. I have a buddy in NH who still eats fried squirrel, btw. I haven't tried it yet.

                                                                                                          1. re: pinehurst
                                                                                                            MGZ Jun 5, 2013 08:25 AM

                                                                                                            They have estimated that eighty to a hundred old trees in my little town at the Shore were wrecked by Sandy.* We have three forty-something year old Maples in our backyard that survived the Storm. Two of 'em now have squirrels nests in 'em, 'cause they have so many fewer choices right now. They make a lot of noise around five am.

                                                                                                            I have a turkey fryer . . . .

                                                                                                            1. re: MGZ
                                                                                                              pinehurst Jun 5, 2013 08:48 AM

                                                                                                              :-)

                                                                                                        2. Steve Green Jun 5, 2013 07:57 AM

                                                                                                          For a humorous take on (mostly) 40s--50s cookbooks, there's The Gallery of Regrettable Food:
                                                                                                          http://www.lileks.com/institute/galle...

                                                                                                          1 Reply
                                                                                                          1. re: Steve Green
                                                                                                            pinehurst Jun 5, 2013 09:03 AM

                                                                                                            Steve, I almost fell under my desk while glancing through these. These are hilarious. Thank you!

                                                                                                          2. Googs Jun 5, 2013 08:18 AM

                                                                                                            I use them constantly at home. I never find dated cookbooks to be so. I'm constantly amused by finding recipes for the latest trends. Sure, the food styling can be pretty darn funny, but the ingredients and techniques remain solid.

                                                                                                            1. weezieduzzit Jun 5, 2013 08:28 AM

                                                                                                              As a dealer of vintage goods I can say for fact that vintage cookbooks are always in demand- they are one of the few constants in this business. Some are nostalgic, some are funny, some are just awesome reference material but they are always sought after.

                                                                                                              Personally, I only own a couple of modern cookbooks but several vintage ones dating back to the 20s. One of my favorites is a 30s cookbook in a very deco metal cover that completely covers and protects the pages. They're the cookbooks I reach for when I need to check the time and temp for a large piece of meat, for a classic dessert recipe, for any "comfort food" and of course, the 50s and 60s books for crazy summer appetizer ideas. :)

                                                                                                              1. s
                                                                                                                shaja Jun 5, 2013 06:38 PM

                                                                                                                I started collecting cookbooks when I was 10 and got my first "dated" (I call them "antique" or "classic") cookbook when I was 20. It was the Ryzon Baking Book circa 1916 by Marion Harris Neil. Its purpose in its day was propaganda to get the home cook to accept using that new-fangled baking powder, but I was absolutely hooked by the fascinating look back in time and the beautiful illustrations that appeared to be hand-colored.

                                                                                                                By the time I was 40, I had more than 700 cookbooks and a third of them were antiques (1960 or older). I finally got sick of hauling so many boxes around and pared my collection down around 10 years ago. I knew I had a problem when I'd walk into an antique store, look at the shelf of cookbooks and say "got it" to every book. Shoppers at Goodwill had a field day with my stuff, I'm sure!!

                                                                                                                I have around 125 today, still a third of which are antiques. I still have that fascinating little Ryzon book; my very own first cookbook (all mine, not my mother's, which is a big deal to an 8 year old) Betty Crocker Boys and Girls circa 1972; and my all-time go-to favorite, Betty Crocker circa 1978 with the best chocolate cake recipe.

                                                                                                                One of my favorite antiques is my oldest, which is The Practical Cook Book by Mrs. Bliss, circa 1853. Found that one at the bottom of a pile of books at a flea market, and I have treasured it for 25 years.

                                                                                                                And, for the fun-est narrative in a cookbook ever, "A Thousand Ways to Please a Husband with Bettina's Best Recipes" circa 1917. This book is a hoot! It tells the story of newlyweds Bob and Bettina first year of wedded life, and each chapter is some domestic situation that Bettina sails through like the perfect little homemaker she is. Sample chapter titles: "Bettina's First Guest", "Bettina's Father Tries Her Cooking" "Bettina Gives a Porch Party" and "Buying a Refrigerator" (a tip: it must hold at least 100 pounds of ice to be more economical in the long run). The chapter ends with a sample menu and recipes.

                                                                                                                1 Reply
                                                                                                                1. re: shaja
                                                                                                                  Googs Jun 6, 2013 09:32 AM

                                                                                                                  You never think Betty Crocker would be anything more than fluff until you open the book. I have a few, probably a half dozen, and I love and use them all.

                                                                                                                2. j
                                                                                                                  JulesNoctambule Jun 6, 2013 01:30 PM

                                                                                                                  I've been collecting old cookbooks for more than twenty years now; my oldest is a handwritten one dating circa 1850, and I have around 5k cookbooks, give or take - and yes, I do cook from them! One of my go-to cake recipes comes from a turn-of-the-century cookbook, and my favourite biscuit recipe dates to the late 1950s. My husband says he considers himself lucky, since some women collect designer purses instead. ;)

                                                                                                                  3 Replies
                                                                                                                  1. re: JulesNoctambule
                                                                                                                    MGZ Jun 6, 2013 01:39 PM

                                                                                                                    Assure your husband that at least this old 'hound thinks he's awful lucky.

                                                                                                                    1. re: MGZ
                                                                                                                      hill food Jun 6, 2013 08:10 PM

                                                                                                                      heck yes, "a handwritten one dating circa 1850"

                                                                                                                      I do hope you've scanned (or had that scanned) for posterity

                                                                                                                      1. re: hill food
                                                                                                                        j
                                                                                                                        JulesNoctambule Jun 24, 2013 10:31 AM

                                                                                                                        It's in surprisingly good condition! Clean, readable, tight binding. We do hope to digitize as much of the collection as we can, though. Scored a good one this weekend; Georgia, 1870s. An antique dealer friend of mine found it and brought it to me along with an extra bag of clipped and written recipes that were with it. It's so fragile I think I'm going to have to invest in a handheld scanner.

                                                                                                                  2. natewrites Jun 7, 2013 11:18 AM

                                                                                                                    Heck yes.

                                                                                                                    I have a huge collection of what I will call "old timey church farm women" cookbooks.

                                                                                                                    The best are the ones from the 1960's-1970's who had contributors who at the time were octogenarians, submitting recipes that they have used their whole lives, particularly ethnic, old school recipes like homemade sauerkraut, lime pickles, piccalilie, apple butter, etc.

                                                                                                                    I'm NOT talking about the nasty jello or cream of mushroom recipes, but women who were submitting their and their mothers' recipes from the 1900's-1940's before processed foods were developed.

                                                                                                                    3 Replies
                                                                                                                    1. re: natewrites
                                                                                                                      Ruthie789 Jun 7, 2013 02:39 PM

                                                                                                                      I just love church lady recipes, often family recipes that have been handed down generation to generation.

                                                                                                                      1. re: natewrites
                                                                                                                        hill food Jun 8, 2013 02:31 AM

                                                                                                                        yes these are to be preserved.

                                                                                                                        1. re: natewrites
                                                                                                                          kimeats Jun 11, 2013 12:27 PM

                                                                                                                          I collect these as well!

                                                                                                                        2. Ruthie789 Jun 15, 2013 06:23 PM

                                                                                                                          Today I discovered a second hand book store located near a senior citizen`s home, think it might serve as a drop off centre for old books. I bought two old books, Madame Benoit The New and Complete Encyclopedia of Cooking, Deluxe Edition and a French book called La Cuisine de Monique Chevrier, Sa Technique, Ses Recettes. My friend beat me to the punch and bought a cookbook from 1957 which was an official Canadian Military manual for recipes. It looked interesting but portions were mega.

                                                                                                                          1 Reply
                                                                                                                          1. re: Ruthie789
                                                                                                                            hill food Jun 17, 2013 09:22 AM

                                                                                                                            get out that calculator!

                                                                                                                          2. Antilope Jun 18, 2013 06:00 PM

                                                                                                                            How about an online dated cookbook?

                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies Recipes 1941 - 2008

                                                                                                                            A favorite cookie and recipe for each year from 1941 through 2008 from Gourmet Magazine on their old website that has been archived.

                                                                                                                            The Gourmet website pages were taken down after the magazine closed, but you can access the pages and recipes at Archive.org. After clicking on the links below, click on the individual cookie pictures for the recipes. The pages also allow you to copy and paste or print them out.

                                                                                                                            Give these links a minute to load the page after clicking on it.
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 1940s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/20090414185732/http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1940s
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 1950s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/20090415210419/http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1950s
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 1960s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/20090421105503/http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1960s
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 1970s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/20090415015215/http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1970s
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 1980s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/20090415195523/http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1980s
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 1990s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/20090415014350/http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/cookies/1990s
                                                                                                                            .
                                                                                                                            Gourmet Magazine Favorite Cookies 2000s

                                                                                                                            http://web.archive.org/web/2009041600...

                                                                                                                            1. skamama Jul 7, 2013 03:02 PM

                                                                                                                              I recently came across a forgotten family heirloom, the "Pure Food Cook Book," published in 1923 by the Women's Progressive Farmers' Association of the State of Missouri. It originally belonged to my Great-Aunt Lora, then was passed down to my grandmother, my mother, and now me. There are a number of handwritten recipes interspersed among the pages, including recipes for Sliced Peach Pie and Bread and Butter Pickles, in Great-Aunt Lora's handwriting. My favorite was inserted between pages, a recipe in my grandmother's handwriting for "Pigs in Blanket," not the frankfurter version, but a stuffed cabbage recipe. The best part: the recipe is on the back of a deposit slip for the World War I Auxiliary #157 account at Peoples Bank. In addition to recipes for Loganberry Lemonade, Virginia Chow Chow and Peach Pickles, this book has a recipe in Great-Aunt Lora's handwriting for Green Tomato Preserves. The last page is "How to Cook Husbands," which includes this gem: "Tie him in the kettle by a strong silken cord, called comfort; duty is apt to be weak. Husbands are apt to fly out of the kettle and be burned and crusty on the edge, since, like crabs and lobsters, you have to cook them while alive. Make a clear, steady fire out of love, neatness and cheerfulness. Set your husband as near this as seems to agree with him. If he sputters and fizzes, do not be anxious. Some husbands do this until they are quite done. Add a little sugar in the form of what confectioners call kisses, but no vinegar or pepper on any account..." Another on my shelf is the "Can't Fail Cook Book," by Isabelle Clark Swezy, published by Vitucci Virgin Olive Oil. The year is nowhere in evidence, but it's definitely close to 100 years old. In addition to recipes for Canellon of Beef and Rice and Salmon Turbot, it gives directions for a furniture and floor polish made with turpentine, vinegar, and you guessed it ---- 1 cup of Vitucci Virgin Olive Oil. The most helpful book on the shelf is the "Farm Journal Cookbook," a mainstay when I was growing up. Get one of the earlier editions if you can, as it has farmstead essential information as well as tried and true recipes. "Stocking Up" is another good one in that vein. If your family is like mine, there are some gems stashed away among the recipe cards. My sister asked us to entrust her with our favorites, including those in our grandmothers' handwriting, and scanned them in. The result was a CD that was her holiday gift to everyone, quite treasured.

                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                              2 Replies
                                                                                                                              1. re: skamama
                                                                                                                                MGZ Jul 7, 2013 03:30 PM

                                                                                                                                OK. That is so f*ckin' awesome! Just the best. When Jim and Bill started this place, I think, that's what they had in mind. Moreover, the way you convey it, is what some of us have grown up to do since then. Fantastic. An ace. At this moment, it's gettin' the Oscar for the best screenplay of the year

                                                                                                                                Cherish what you have like a first born child.

                                                                                                                                1. re: skamama
                                                                                                                                  hill food Jul 7, 2013 07:03 PM

                                                                                                                                  ha! my grandma hand-copied that "How to Cook a Husband" one into her notebook, must have made quite the rounds in its day.

                                                                                                                                2. Antilope Jul 9, 2013 08:54 AM

                                                                                                                                  Old Church and Community Cookbooks - Free Online E-Copies

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **The Chapel chef - Eastern Shore Chapel, Virginia Beach, VA - 1964**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/chapelchef00east#page/n0/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/chapelchef00east

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Grandview Congregational Church, Grandview, OH - 1916**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/recipesgrandview00granrich#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/recipesgrandview00granrich

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Good recipes, Winnetka Congregational Church, Winnetka, IL - 1906**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/goodrecipes00winn#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/goodrecipes00winn

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Favorite recipes, Tuesday Clubhouse Ass'n, Sacramento, CA - 1903**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/favoriterecipes00cumbiala#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/favoriterecipes00cumbiala

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Favorite recipes - Cumberland Presbyterian Church, Hanford, CA - 1903**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/faverecipescpc00cumbiala#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/faverecipescpc00cumbiala

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Fries Memorial Moravian Church, Collierville, TN - 1988**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/friesmemorialmor00frie#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/friesmemorialmor00frie

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Trinity Church, Reno, NV - 1894**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/riversiderecipes00trinrich#page/n5/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/riversiderecipes00trinrich

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **First Baptist Church, Rochester, NY - 1887**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/motherhubbardscu00firs

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/motherhubbardscu00firs#page/n3/mode/2up

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                                                                                                                                  **Brewster Congregational church, Detroit, MI - 1921**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/bookofrecipes00detr#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/bookofrecipes00detr

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                                                                                                                                  **Favorite recipes, Rumple Memorial Presbyterian Church, Blowing Rock, NC - 1970**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/favoriterecipesb00rump#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/favoriterecipesb00rump

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                                                                                                                                  **Butter 'n Love Recipes, Crossnore Presbyterian Church, Crossnore, NC - 1982**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/butternloverecip00cros#page/n0/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/butternloverecip00cros

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                                                                                                                                  **Recipes We Love To Cook, Benton Heights Presbyterian Church, Monroe, NC - 1979**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/recipeswelovetoc00bent#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/recipeswelovetoc00bent

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                                                                                                                                  **Baptist Church, Fayette, MO - 1887**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/missouricookbook00faye#page/n9/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/missouricookbook00faye

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                                                                                                                                  **Holy Trinity Lutheran Church, Raleigh, NC - 1984**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/saintsinkitchenf00holy#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/saintsinkitchenf00holy

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                                                                                                                                  **Myers Park Presbyterian Church, Charlotte, NC - 2001**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/countourblessing00myer#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/countourblessing00myer

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                                                                                                                                  ** St. John's Lutheran Church & Grange, Cabarrus County, NC - 1975**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/grangerangecookb00nort#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/grangerangecookb00nort

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                                                                                                                                  **Pilgrim Evangelical Lutheran Church, Chicago, IL, - 1921**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/pilgrimcookbookc00pilg#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/pilgrimcookbookc00pilg

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                                                                                                                                  **White Oak Baptist Church, Archer Lodge, N.C - 2004**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/heavenlyhelpings00whit#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/heavenlyhelpings00whit

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                                                                                                                                  **The Second Church of West Newton, MA, - 1921**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/recipestestedbyf00west#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/recipestestedbyf00west

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                                                                                                                                  **First Congregational Church, Battle Creek, MI - 1922**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/battlecreekcookb00batt#page/n7/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/battlecreekcookb00batt

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                                                                                                                                  **New Hope Presbyterian Church, Gastonia, NC - 1993**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/bicentennialbite00newh#page/n5/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/bicentennialbite00newh

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                                                                                                                                  **Macedonia United Methodist Church, Raleigh, NC - 1978**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/friendlyrecipesc00brow#page/n9/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/friendlyrecipesc00brow

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                                                                                                                                  **How We Cook In Los Angeles , Simpson M.E. Church, Los Angeles, CA - 1894**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/howwecookinlosan00losa#page/n5/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/howwecookinlosan00losa

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                                                                                                                                  **The International Jewish Cook Book; a Modern "Kosher" Cook Book - 1918**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/cu31924003580952#page/n5/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cu31924003580952

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                                                                                                                                  **Council Cook Book, Council of Jewish Women, San Francisco, CA - 1908**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/cu31924085804767#page/n9/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cu31924085804767

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                                                                                                                                  **The Universal Cook Book, Council of Jewish Women, Boston, MA - 1909**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/universalcookboo00phil#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/universalcookboo00phil

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                                                                                                                                  ** Central Congregational Church, Topeka, KS - 1913**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/centralcongregat00cent#page/n5/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/centralcongregat00cent

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                                                                                                                                  **Methodist Church, Garland, NC - 1950**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/cookbook00meth#page/n0/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cookbook00meth

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                                                                                                                                  **Hawaiian Cook Book, Central Union Church, Honolulu, HI - 1920**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/hawaiiancookbook00hono#page/n7/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/hawaiiancookbook00hono

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                                                                                                                                  **Presbyterian Church, York, NE - 1911**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/yorkcookbook00york#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/yorkcookbook00york

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                                                                                                                                  **Parker Memorial M. E. Church, New Orleans ,LA - 1898**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/neworleanscookbo00newo#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/neworleanscookbo00newo

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                                                                                                                                  **Union Church of Manila, Philippines - 1919**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/cu31924059639215#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cu31924059639215

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                                                                                                                                  **United Methodist Church Virginia Beach, VA - 1983**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/cookstourofvirgi00virg#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cookstourofvirgi00virg

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                                                                                                                                  ** Biltmore United Methodist Church, Asheville, NC - 1975**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/whatscooknatbilt00bilt#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/whatscooknatbilt00bilt

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                                                                                                                                  ** Benton Heights Presbyterian Church, Monroe, NC - 1979**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/recipeswelovetoc00bent#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/recipeswelovetoc00bent

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **: Friedland Moravian Church, Forsyth County, NC - 1972**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/friedlandcookboo00frie#page/n3/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/friedlandcookboo00frie

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Central Methodist Church, Spencer, NC - 1948**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/gertrudebobbittc00cent#page/n1/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/gertrudebobbittc00cent

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                                                                                                                                  ** Pritchard Memorial Baptist Church, Charlotte, NC - 1984**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/cookingpritchard00prit#page/n0/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/cookingpritchard00prit

                                                                                                                                  -----

                                                                                                                                  **Galilee Episcopal Church, Virginia Beach, Va - 1964**

                                                                                                                                  Read Online:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/stream/loavesfishes00gali#page/n0/mode/2up

                                                                                                                                  Free Downloadable e-files:
                                                                                                                                  http://archive.org/details/loavesfish...

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