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De buyer mineral pans and warping

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Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 04:01 PM

I have two of these. A smaller one(can't remember the size) and an with 30 or 32cm one. Both of them I like very much and rarely if ever use non stick anymore. I figured good heavy pans like these wouldn't warp like cast iron doesn't but my big pan is decidedly warped. It wobbles slightly on my ceramic stovetop and I notice the oil does seem to navigate to the outsides of the pan. Because of the wobble it no longer sits flat on the stove so I now have spots hotter than others. Surprisingly the inside gets hotter yet if oil goes out that seems odd. Long story short have others had this problem with these pans? I've never put water in when very hot and I don't believe I've overheated it. It should be good for quite high heat though. My small one still sits perfectly flat but I don't use it as much

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  1. Chemicalkinetics RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 04:37 PM

    DeBuyer mineral pans are fairly thick pan, so I too am surprised regarding your experience. Based on your description, I cannot tell which way it is warped. If the center is raised, then the pan won't wobble, but if the side is raised then the oil should moved toward the center. Regardless, you probably will have to hammer it flat. Get a towel (or any soft material), cover the surface, and get a hammer or a mallet and tap it flat.

    <oil does seem to navigate to the outsides of the pan>

    Oil moving outside of a pan is very normal. It would do that even if the pan is dead flat.

    <I've never put water in when very hot and I don't believe I've overheated it>

    It is possible that your stove has a very uneven heat output, so the pan has been experiencing a large temperature gradient across its surface, leading it to warping.

    12 Replies
    1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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      Vicv07 RE: Chemicalkinetics Nov 9, 2012 04:56 PM

      I never thought of flattening it by hand. Ya that doesn't make sense I know about the wobble. Well I'm house shopping(currently renting) and when I find one I'll be getting a gas stove. Should solve the problem as flame isn't exactly flat. I didn't think these should warp easily. I do very often get it quite hot but that's kind of what it's meant for

      1. re: Vicv07
        Chemicalkinetics RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 04:59 PM

        <Should solve the problem as flame isn't exactly flat>

        Right. Gas stoves won't require absolutely flat surface, either do the traditional electric coil stoves.

        1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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          Vicv07 RE: Chemicalkinetics Nov 9, 2012 05:32 PM

          Even the old stove could are still pretty flat across. I still plan on getting gas. Here I just don't have the line in the kitchen and I'm not putting one in in someone else's house. I miss having a gas stove. OT though. I'll try the hammering thing. Thanks

          1. re: Vicv07
            Chemicalkinetics RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 05:47 PM

            :) Make sure you hammer in the correct direction.

            1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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              Vicv07 RE: Chemicalkinetics Nov 9, 2012 06:18 PM

              As in? I'm no blacksmith? Maybe I shouldn't! Lol

              1. re: Vicv07
                Chemicalkinetics RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 06:27 PM

                :) I mean make sure you know which side you want to hammer. So far, I still couldn't tell if the pan center is elevated or sunken.

                1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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                  Vicv07 RE: Chemicalkinetics Nov 9, 2012 06:40 PM

                  Neither can I :(. I just know it doesn't sit flat anymore. Still cooks beautifully though

                  1. re: Vicv07
                    Chemicalkinetics RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 07:01 PM

                    Likely, the center is depressed. So you will have to flip the pan upside down, and hit from the bottom.

                    1. re: Vicv07
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                      jljohn RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 07:04 PM

                      Sounds to me like you have a rotational warp (not a technical term), like you might get on a cookie sheet or jelly roll pan. It's as if you grasped the pan on opposite edges with your hands and twisted it. You'd get a pan that rocks on a flat surface and has a high spot in the middle so that oil runs to the edge. People too often think about pan warping as if the bottom could only be bowed in or out, but very strange things can happen from time-to-time.

                      I assume it's never been dropped or anything? And are you absolutely sure it didn't come from the factory this way?

                      1. re: jljohn
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                        Vicv07 RE: jljohn Nov 9, 2012 07:11 PM

                        Ya I'm sure. Sit perfectly when I got it. What you're saying about the twist does kind of make sense. Odd to happen though. I used to have an ancient aluminum sauté pan that must have been 1/2" higher in the middle. It's not like that. The warp is very small. Just a slight wobble. Maybe a mm or 2

                        1. re: Vicv07
                          Chemicalkinetics RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 07:29 PM

                          If you want to know for sure, then get a ruler and lay the ruler against the back of the pan. My guess is that the cooking surface has bowed out. Twisting is unusual for a circular pan.

                          As mentioned, oil moving toward the edge of a heated pan is actually very normal even for a flat pan. In fact, what you probably noticed is that the oil is fairly evenly spread on the cold pan, but the same oil will move away from the center to the edge as the pan is heated up. It does not indicate the side is lower or not.

                          Just use a rule and that will tell you what you really have.

                          1. re: Chemicalkinetics
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                            Vicv07 RE: Chemicalkinetics Nov 9, 2012 07:39 PM

                            You're right about the oil. I always put cold oil in a hot pan and now I think of it it does migrate as it comes up to temp. Another reason I eventually want a wok! Doesn't help with searing meat though when the oil movie away from it

      2. kaleokahu RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 07:16 PM

        Hi, Vic:

        Unfortunately, these pans can and do warp> I once made the mistake of suggesting to a fellow Hound that they use a Mineral crepe pan as a converter disc on an induction hob. It apparently warped.

        I think your chances of successfully hammering this back to flat are slim to nil. Take it back and complain until they give you a new one.

        Aloha,
        Kaleo

        6 Replies
        1. re: kaleokahu
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          Vicv07 RE: kaleokahu Nov 9, 2012 07:26 PM

          Thanks. I'm not like that though. It wasn't like that when I bought it so obviously it was something it did. Maybe I did overheat it. I've been drying it before after wash and forget about it. I'm not sure what the temp is it can take. Maybe I've went past it

          1. re: kaleokahu
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            Vicv07 RE: kaleokahu Nov 9, 2012 07:26 PM

            Converter disc?

            1. re: Vicv07
              kaleokahu RE: Vicv07 Nov 9, 2012 09:00 PM

              Hi, Vic:

              Yes, one of my friends here wanted to try using non-ferrous cookware on an induction hob, and so I recommended sitting the crepe pan on the hob, and the non-ferrous pan on top of the crepe.

              Apparently including stress relief from the production wasn't a big priority for deBuyer. But I still felt bad about recommending what I did.

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              1. re: kaleokahu
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                Vicv07 RE: kaleokahu Nov 10, 2012 04:25 AM

                Interesting way to use a induction hob. I guess if that's all he had. Conventional hearing works fine for me

                1. re: Vicv07
                  kaleokahu RE: Vicv07 Nov 10, 2012 08:54 AM

                  Hi, Vic:

                  Conventional hobs work fine for me, too.

                  But in the press for modernity, folks are attracted by the promise of induction. And after they jump, what do they do with all their cookware that no longer "works"? There are several converter disks available out there intended to allow the non-ferrous cookware to function (yes, albeit at a lower efficiency). Our friend's crepe pan was at least as thick and stout as these disks, yet it warped. I still feel chagrined that I recommended it, so I'm belaboring the point here so the costly mistake won't be repeated.

                  Aloha,
                  Kaleo

                  1. re: kaleokahu
                    SanityRemoved RE: kaleokahu Nov 10, 2012 03:11 PM

                    It's all good Kaleo, I still use the pan. If someday I win the lotto I could invest in a big hydraulic press and be the one guy that flattens pan bottoms for cheap.

                    Hand hammering pans to remove a warp becomes far more difficult when using a glass/ceramic stove top. Lots of new pans like to spin if you tap the side of the handle of the pan. Ahh the joys of a gas hob are sorely missed.

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