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Need bread bucket

m
Mollybud Nov 8, 2012 06:02 PM

I am looking for a 5-6 quart bread bucket with lid to store dough in fridge for Artisan Bread. I know I can order on line but would prefer to see what I am buying. Anyone else into this and have any thoughts where I might find one? I have tried Wal Mart, Target and food markets.

  1. t
    Tam38 Nov 12, 2012 10:35 AM

    Sam's Club has large square containers with lids that work perfectly. They come in packs of 2 and are very reasonable. They're back with the kitchen supplies next to the freezer section.

    1 Reply
    1. re: Tam38
      m
      Mollybud Nov 13, 2012 05:23 AM

      Thanks, Tam. Will check that out.

    2. k
      Kelli2006 Nov 10, 2012 06:09 PM

      I use a one gallon plus (15 Cup) Rubbermaid bulk storage containers for proofing and storing bread dough.

      http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/Pa...

      1. j
        janniecooks Nov 9, 2012 12:51 AM

        Your nearest restaurant supply store is almost certain to carry what you're looking for.

        4 Replies
        1. re: janniecooks
          m
          Mollybud Nov 9, 2012 05:51 AM

          Thanks, will try the restaurant supply store. We do not have cash and carry stores. Have either of you tried this bread making system? It is new to me. Any do's and don'ts you can give?

          1. re: Mollybud
            j
            janniecooks Nov 9, 2012 06:54 AM

            I'm not sure what "bread making system" you refer to. For regular yeast doughs as well as no-knead doughs, the only thing I use is a large-ish crockery bowl covered with a towel or plastic wrap; no need for me to get another product since what I have is serviceable. The cambro buckets Cam14 refers to are just plastic or polycarbonate lidded containers designed for commercial use but usually available to consumers at restaurant suppliers. They stand up to abuse, have measurement markings on the side and are good for proofing and rising dough since it's easy to check when volume is doubled.

            There's no magic to the container used to proof/rise yeast dough. If you're looking for do's and don'ts on the specifics of making bread, or no-knead bread, there are numerous threads on the home cooking board.

            1. re: janniecooks
              m
              Mollybud Nov 9, 2012 02:24 PM

              Thanks Janniecooks for all you info. I previously knew all that. You probably did not see my first post referring to Artisan Bread. I just wanted thoughts from people on this board that had made Artisan Bread. Maybe I did not make my post clear. I know there is no magic in the container to hold the dough, I was just trying to find the correct size.

              1. re: Mollybud
                j
                janniecooks Nov 10, 2012 01:53 AM

                Sorry Mollybud, I meant no offense. I did read your original post, and it just wasn't clear to me what you were asking, perhaps I am obtuse. You hadn't previously asked about WHAT size, you specified a size. The correct size cambro is the size that works for the quantity of dough you wish to make. Perhaps you are looking for some kind of formula, e.g. a dough comprising four cups flour needs to rise in a four-quart container. For that check your baking resources; there are several great books and websites for home bakers, Peter Reinhart and Nancy Silverton are two that come to mind.

                For a six-quart cambro, here's a link to one website; any restaurant supply store will carry these in multiple sizes. The Cambro brand is very common, most restaurants use them:

                http://www.webstaurantstore.com/cambr...

        2. c
          Cam14 Nov 8, 2012 08:10 PM

          Our town has Cash and Carry stores that have restaurant foods and supplies and they carry the nice big food safe Cambro 6 qt. buckets with lid.

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