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Would a copper griddle be a bad idea?

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jljohn Nov 7, 2012 06:37 AM

I use my griddle for pancakes. Ok, once I broiled fish on it, but otherwise it's only for pancakes, and we make them a lot! In the past, I've used a non-stick aluminum griddle and a cast iron griddle. I didn't like the non-stick finish and, even with oven pre-heating, the cast iron is still too uneven. I know there are companies like Storm Copper where one can buy a pre-cut piece of copper sheet stock. I could get stock up to 1/4" thick if I wanted. And I suppose I could always have a piece of sheet stock tinned on one side. Since I don't need a griddle with a lip around the edge, would making a copper griddle this way present any problems or issues? Thanks!

Jeremy

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    John Francis RE: jljohn Nov 7, 2012 07:46 AM

    I don't know about copper, though it seems pretty unlikely. Since you make a lot of pancakes, you might do better with an electric griddle, whose heating element should heat the cooking surface more evenly than any metal griddle spread across two burners, and whose temperature can be precisely controlled..

    1 Reply
    1. re: John Francis
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      jljohn RE: John Francis Nov 7, 2012 08:08 AM

      I may have to look into that. I've not exactly shopped for one, but space is at a premium here, and I was alway under the impression that they were all non-stick. If I could find a trim, not non-stick, then I might be in business!

    2. kaleokahu RE: jljohn Nov 7, 2012 08:00 AM

      Hi, Jeremy:

      It would work very well, I think. As even as it gets, and still quite a lot of heat capacity.

      I would bend a very short rim on it, though. Unless you went with the 0.250 stock (yikes!) it would be somewhat prone to bending. And think of the other, baking uses that might benefit from a rim.

      The only issue I see is cost.

      I've seen a Gaillard baking pan like you're envisioning, so you are not necessarily on the wrong track here.

      Aloha,
      Kaleo

      2 Replies
      1. re: kaleokahu
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        jljohn RE: kaleokahu Nov 7, 2012 08:07 AM

        <I would bend a very short rim on it, though. Unless you went with the 0.250 stock (yikes!) it would be somewhat prone to bending. And think of the other, baking uses that might benefit from a rim.>

        I hadn't considered the warping/bending issues without a rim or lip. Do you know anyone who could do such a thing and tin it? I can always ask Peter or Jim, but I thought you might know of someone.

        <I've seen a Gaillard baking pan like you're envisioning, so you are not necessarily on the wrong track here.>

        Would that be the 16x20x1 Genoise at 4and 20? What a pan--if only it weren't so much!

        1. re: jljohn
          kaleokahu RE: jljohn Nov 7, 2012 09:12 AM

          Hi, Jeremy:

          I'm sure French Copper Studio could do it. Actually, I think pretty much any metal fab shop can bend you the rim, and then any tinner could do the lining. I'd keep the rim really short and simple--no folds or joinery.

          If you haven't tried LJ Gonzalez in New Orleans for tinning, you might give him a shot--great guy. You contact him through Lucullus Antiques.

          If you try this, let me know what you pay for the sheetstock and everything.

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

          PS Yeah, the Genoise pan is really cool.

      2. wekick RE: jljohn Nov 7, 2012 09:13 AM

        This is an uncoated aluminum griddle.
        http://www.bridgekitchenware.com/brow...

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