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Garlic Rolls

j
JudyDenver Nov 5, 2012 10:26 AM

For the past 20 years, we have been enjoying the garlic rolls at one of our favorite Italian restaurants in Denver (Carmine's on Penn). The recipe is a guarded secret so there is no chance they will share the recipe. Last night I was told the ingredient list does not contain milk or butter. I knew I was pushing my luck so I didn't ask about whether eggs are included. How could they possibly produce such a soft, tender garlic roll? I am positive they slather the top with garlic olive oil while the rolls are still warm.

My pizza dough recipe does not contain milk or butter (but a little olive oil) and the texture is not even close to these additive, wonderful rolls.

Can anyone help me come up with a recipe to try? These rolls are definitely in the " to die for" category!

  1. biondanonima Nov 5, 2012 10:29 AM

    Does no milk mean no dairy, period? If not, I would assume they've got cream or half and half in there as a tenderizing agent. Potato-based breads are also often very soft.

    1 Reply
    1. re: biondanonima
      s
      shallots Nov 5, 2012 06:31 PM

      Or even dry milk?

    2. todao Nov 5, 2012 11:19 AM

      Challah is a very soft light bread and it uses no dairy. You might try working with a Challah formula and adjusting as appropriate, then forming the dough into rolls instead of a loaf. Some Challah recipes use veg. oil, others use shortening - I'd go with the shortening.

      1 Reply
      1. re: todao
        todao Nov 5, 2012 11:57 AM

        Or try this:
        Use a whisk to blend 23 ounces of AP flour, 1 tablespoon of salt, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 4 1/2 teaspoons of active dry yeast.
        Combine with 1 1/2 cups of warm (105 degrees) water, 1 1/2 ounces olive oil, 1 clove pulverized garlic, 1 beaten egg.
        Coat hands with olive oil and mix well (about 3 minutes) or use stand mixer with paddle to mix until dough begins to pull away from the sides of the bowl.
        Knead with oiled hands 5 - 8 minutes or use dough hook of stand mixer to knead 4 - 6 minutes or until the dough pulls away form the sides of the bowl and begins to climb the dough hook.
        Form into ball and place in covered oiled pan until nearly, but not completely, doubled in mass.
        That should make a very sticky dough.
        Coat hands with olive oil and knead briefly, folding as you knead. You may need to use a pastry scraper to reduce sticking to counter or board.
        Use pastry scraper of knife to cut into 3 - 4 ounce pieces. Use palm of your hand to roll on floured surface. Place on parchment paper covered baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap. Set aside in warm place until nearly doubled in size (but don't let them double entirely).
        Place in preheated 450 degree oven and bake until golden brown or internal temprerature reaches 200 degrees.
        Remove from oven, cover with towel and allow to cool until they are just warm, the brush with garlic butter and allow to cool completely on cooling rack.

      2. Becca Porter Nov 5, 2012 11:40 AM

        Cook's Country put out an awesome garlic knots recipe. I think you steep garlic in butter, sieve out the garlic and add it to the dough, use some of the butter in the dough, and then brush the rest on top after baking.

        1. j
          JudyDenver Nov 5, 2012 11:54 AM

          I am not opposed to dairy so if I could find a recipe with butter, milk and/or eggs which turned out the same I would be delighted. I tried to copy a photo but not successful. I am certain there weren't any eggs unless they just used the whites. Never thought about potato. Maybe potato and shortening?

          1. s
            sandylc Nov 5, 2012 12:27 PM

            Cream? Olive oil (lots)? Margarine? Shortening? Eggs?

            1. l
              LUV_TO_EAT Nov 5, 2012 01:07 PM

              Maybe they use Yogurt...I put yogurt into my Naan it it helps tenderize dough.

              1 Reply
              1. re: LUV_TO_EAT
                s
                sandylc Nov 5, 2012 01:46 PM

                Hm-mm....or sour cream or buttermilk....

              2. todao Nov 5, 2012 03:08 PM

                Dear JudyDenver, there is one thing for certain. The likelihood of your hitting the bullseye on this one the first time out is extremely low. The basics of bread (flour, yeast, salt and water) are a given. But the countless things that can be added to any bread making formula, including the type of flour and the way in which the dough is handled, make your challenge a formidable task . I suspect the best you can do is start at some point that seems to make sense, maintain a very well documented note book outlining every adjustment you make (and never make more than one adjustment at a time) until you achieve your goal.
                Your comment that the rolls are definitely in the "to die for" category suggests that you won't be happy with something close to what they serve so grab some flour and go for it.

                1. s
                  sandylc Nov 6, 2012 02:01 PM

                  Here is a pic:

                  http://www.carminescolorado.com/photos/

                  2 Replies
                  1. re: sandylc
                    j
                    JudyDenver Nov 6, 2012 03:12 PM

                    You got the right one! Now if only someone can get me started in the right direction. I really don't know where to start experimenting.

                    1. re: JudyDenver
                      s
                      sandylc Nov 6, 2012 03:28 PM

                      You know, in the pic it almost looks like an egg bread. It could be an egg bread dough made with oil, like a challah. I'm also guessing that it is a bit sweet, so sugar is likely involved.

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