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quiche using evaporated milk

s
sylvan Nov 2, 2012 09:59 PM

How would evaporated milk taste used in the custard for quiche?
Is fresh spinach better tasting than frozen spinach in quiche?

  1. j
    jaykayen Nov 2, 2012 10:26 PM

    Both will make a delicious quiche!

    1. Caroline1 Nov 2, 2012 10:54 PM

      Evaporated milk will work, but if it was all that great, I sus[ect the web would be crawling with recipes. Some people like the taste of evaporated milk, some don't. I detest the stuff. But I would never deny anyone who likes it from indulging.

      The thing you have to be careful about when it comes to spinach is whether it will be watery. Frozen spinach has to be fully thawed, then well squeezed to get the moisture out. Fresh spinach... Well, if I was going to make a quiche with fresh spinach, first off it would have to be baby spinach. Then I would wash it well, dry it thoroughly (like 2 hours in a salad spinner<g>), then remove the stem completely and tear the large leaves in half, and just add it raw and let it cook inside the custard as the quiche bakes.

      1. d
        dianne1600 Nov 3, 2012 09:45 AM

        I have used evaporated milk in the past for quiche and it turned out just fine. Last week I made a quiche using cream and whole milk instead, and the texture was much more custardy that using evaporated milk. As far as spinach, you could use either fresh or frozen. With frozen, part of the work is already done for you (removing as much liquid is key). Let it thaw and drain it in a colander, pressing down with the back of a spoon to get out as muck moisture as possible. When it's as dry as you can get it, chop it up and continue on with the recipe. Good luck!

        1 Reply
        1. re: dianne1600
          greygarious Nov 3, 2012 09:58 AM

          After all the draining and squeezing, spread it out on several layers of paper toweling, because there will STILL be water seeping out.

          I don't care for the cooked taste of evaporated milk right from the can, but it's fine in coffee and in cooked recipes. Evap does not taste like fresh, but neither does fresh once it has been heated.
          Evap is equivalent, more or less, to using half and half. Evap is made by cooking regular milk until it is reduced in volume by half.

        2. s
          sylvan Nov 3, 2012 03:40 PM

          Thank you for all your great tips!
          I can/will use them.

          1. s
            sylvan Nov 3, 2012 03:55 PM

            I just tasted evaporated milk for the first time and it tastes like cheddar cheese to me,
            not all bad tasting and very distinctive.

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