HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >

Discussion

Baking bread at 450...What can withstand the temp?

Hey Hounds,

I have tried to research this but with the exception of Le Creuset, I'm coming up blank. I have recently started playing around with no knead bread recipes. The long and the short is you stick it in a dutch oven to bake in the oven at 450.

I used my Circulon dutch oven. It survived but judging from the popping noises, I won't do it again. I have an old Visions cookware dutch oven but I can't find the max temp it can take and looking at the thread on exploding Pyrex, I'm thinking not a good idea.

The only brand that advertises the temp is the one mentioned above which is rather pricey for me.

Any thoughts on another brand?

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
  1. <I used my Circulon dutch oven. It survived but judging from the popping noises, I won't do it again. >

    Do you happen to know the Circulon Dutch Oven you used? Is it this one?

    http://www.amazon.com/Circulon-Contem...

    If so, its handles may have trouble handling the temperature, and the nonstick surface is not best for it neither. It is only rated for 400oF.

    <I have an old Visions cookware dutch oven but I can't find the max temp it can take >

    It isn't so much the maximum temperature or maximum heat the glass can handle. it is about thermal shock. Glass actually can handle high heat. Its challenge is to handle sudden temperature change, such as heating it to a high temperature and then cool it very quickly by tossing a bread dough in it -- which the no knead bread recipes do.

    http://bcove.me/a4a9xtye

    For no knead bread, you can use Le Cresuset, but you can use cheaper version of enameled Dutch Ovens as well. In fact, many people use the regular bare Dutch Ovens such as Lodge Dutch Ovens.

    http://www.simplebites.net/wp-content...

    and many people use clay setup, dedicated clay pot or just flower pot with a pizza stone:

    http://www.cookography.com/wp-content...

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Cun9R2l69c8...

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/chocolad...

    There are many alternatives.

    1. I have been making no-knead sourdough lately. Started off using my LeCreuset but wasn't happy doing it. I had the feeling that, even though it's a vintage piece, it wouldn't hold up to the temperatures for very long before discolouring, etc. So I found a great cast aluminum roasting pan - sort of oval in shape with a domed lid - that worked well. THEN I found a non-enamelled cast iron Dutch oven (garage sale: $2) that also worked well. And finally I found one of those unglazed clay baker things - Romertopf or whatever it's called - and it's my favourite of all. You have to be careful with those, though - many of them have a sort of raised ridge on the bottom which doesn't work well for bread. But the one I found has a flat bottom and I absolutely love it. If it dies, so be it. But so far it's doing the trick. They show up at second hand shops and garage sales all the time - usually no more than $2 or $3. No one knows what to do with them.

        1. re: rasputina

          Agreed. Plain or cast aluminum would also withstand the heat (basically, any bare metal dutch oven would), though I'd prefer cast iron for bread making. Lodge's CI dutch ovens are affordable and work well for bread.

        2. I make no knead bread in a French white Corningware casserole. Works fine.

          1. I bought a plain Lodge dutch oven for this very reason.

            Sadly, my bread results were poor, hope you have better luck.

            1. The Lodge brand cast iron "combo cooker" is one of the cheapest options at ~$30, plus you get two functional pans for the price. Load your loaf into the flat skillet lid and cover with the deep pot half. http://www.amazon.com/Lodge-LCC3-Logi...

              1 Reply
              1. re: splatgirl

                For our Italian style bread, we preheat the pan and lid (we use a Le Crueset) along with the oven to 450--takes about half an hour. Then the bread is set into the hot pot, the top cut to allow steam out and the lid put back on. 20 minutes later, take lid off and bake for another 30 minutes. Perfect every time with a brown crunchy/chew crust and lovely interior.

              2. I like to use bare cast iron for breads. I have two bare CI loaf pans that work great.

                1. The bare cast iron 5 qt Lodge with loop handles is pretty cheap, works great for bread and can also kick out a very good roast or fry up a chicken. It can also be used easily on your outdoor grill if necessary. It's a great value. I became upset with it when I cooked a roast with half a bottle of wine and the seasoning came off in the sauce. Don't use it for any tomato or wine based foods until you build up a great seasoning layer. Learn from my mistake!

                  1. Hi, rHairing:

                    Well, other than possibly the knob, melting, you *could* use just about anything except tinned copper. It, too, would be OK, as long as you were careful not to preheat the empty pan all the way to 450 (preheat to 400-425, flop the dough, and then goose it up to 450). It is also *possible* that you could crack your preheated Visions DO by flopping in cold dough.

                    If you're the least bit concerned about the knob melting on something, I say just switch in a metal knob from the hardware store. Cheapest possible CI, cheap metal knob, and you're golden.

                    Aloha,
                    Kaleo

                    1 Reply
                    1. re: kaleokahu

                      "If you're the least bit concerned about the knob melting on something, I say just switch in a metal knob from the hardware store. Cheapest possible CI, cheap metal knob, and you're golden."
                      That's exactly what I did to make my Lodge Color CI dutch oven no-knead-bread-friendly. (Tramontina from Walmart works with the same fix - or you may luck out and find an inexpensive CI dutch oven which already has a metal lid knob.)
                      Alternatively, a pizza stone (or even a metal pizza pan) could be used. If you invert a disposable foil roasting pan over the top, it'll trap the steam like a dutch oven would, without having to spritz water near electric oven coils or a hot glass oven window. A cheap dollar-store pizza pan might be OK to experiment with, but a cast-iron one would be best for that method.

                    2. I have an old enameled CI pot that I replaced the top handle with stainless steel. It handles the heat just fine. Due to thermal shock issues I would be leery of using glass