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Foods you grew up eating but don't fix for yourself or your family

'Round about November my grandmother & family members would butcher a hog & all manner of taste treats would result, but as time went on no one killed a hog anymore & now those recipes are gone forever. I do remember eating a dish that was a cross between head cheese & scrapple - bits of pork meat cooked & chopped real fine & grits were added to the meat broth along with some minced garlic. It was placed in a shallow baking dish & left in the smoke house until jelled & then we just sliced it & put it on crackers with maybe some Koch Kase (cooked cheese). If anyone has a recipe similar to the pork dish, please post here. Peach jam made from canned peaches come to mind also.

Also, when meat was too expensive, we had a lot of vegetables, one recipe in particular was okra gumbo. Also pan fried apples in a little bacon grease to round out the meatless meal. A lot of jello recipes popped up with veggies in them.

What were the delicious foods of your youth you remember eating, but are not seen on the table anymore? Perhaps we should make a couple of these dishes just to bring back memories. Share with us the simple meals of yesterday. Yes, they are probably loaded with bad things like lard & butter, but once in a while won't hurt anybody.

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  1. If only it was that cool.

    The only things that don't repopulate my table now was because they are gross to my adult pallet. Such as: Beanie-Weenies, corn dogs, garbage soup, chicken tonight sauces, or Lipton/Rice-a-roni noodle mixes. Bleck!

    Then again, I did not like sauerkraut, 'good mustard', dark chocolate, or many other things as a kid that I love now.

    23 Replies
    1. re: Crockett67

      >>>
      ...garbage soup...
      <<<
      I gots to know! What's in it?

      Corn dogs wouldn't be too bad if they were made with good hot dogs, not those cheap mushy ones.

      1. re: al b. darned

        A.k.a Left over soup. All left over vegetables and meat (usually hamburger) from the week cooked in canned stewed tomatoes (not strained) to make a 'soup'. Turns my stomach just thinking about it. If there as not enough left over vegetables, mom would bulk it up with canned corn &/or canned green beans.

        To this day I will not stock stewed tomatoes, canned corn, or canned green beans.

        1. re: Crockett67

          Oh my. My mom made a version of that I eventually named international heartburn. Did not matter what it was it went in a pot on Friday and was added to water. I can feel your pain Crockett67. Shudder and an extra eeww. At least your mom used tomatoes. Lucky you

          1. re: suzigirl

            My grandparents made a version of this too, with hamburger and canned peas boiled in canned tomatoes to make a stew. Yuck, yuck, yuck. Also, Tuna Helper, my mom's favorite weeknight time saver. For good foods I miss, my grandparents also liked to make egg and potato frittatas, which were delicious.

            1. re: suzigirl

              Ack...this is what my Dad used to call his "goulash". Whatever was left in the fridge at the end of the week, he dumped into a pot on the stove. Leftover spaghetti. Leftover canned veggies. Hamburger patties. Chinese take-out. Chili. Pizza (cut up the leftover slices and in the pot they went). Leftover pancakes. Fried chicken cut off the bone. Anything was game. He'd throw it all in a pot, add a can of tomato sauce and declare it "goulash". None of us kids would eat it for fear of getting sick - which he would as the only one to ingest it, yet he never seemed to make the connection.

              1. re: Mutch2Do

                This is a whole new level of nasty! Going to bed hungry never looked so good eh?

                1. re: Mutch2Do

                  You know what I'm talking about exactly!!! My mom als didn't use Saran wrap. It was a nightmare. Oh the scars... :-)

                2. re: suzigirl

                  Yeah suzigirl, I know I was luckier than most, but still not a joy to eat. I would equate it to the level of disgust some would have for their mother's meatloaf. Yeah it's meatloaf but if given the chance, you would pass on it.

                  1. re: Crockett67

                    So your moms meatloaf sucked too? Where are you from? You sure my family isn't related to yours?

                    1. re: suzigirl

                      OH, gee, my Mom's meatloaf is/was TERRIBLE. Dry, flavorless, falling apart. Shudder. I'm sure she probably still thinks her recipe is great! It's hard to avoid dinner invites from her.

                      1. re: sandylc

                        Sounds like my moms. And way to much french onion soup mix. Yuk

                      2. re: suzigirl

                        lol! No it was 'that' bad. But she didn't make it that often either. It's just a common complaint I hear from coworkers and friend about how they hate their mother's meatloaf and refuse to eat any meatloaf because of it.

                        Maybe it's just a Midwest thing.

                        1. re: Crockett67

                          That's exactly why I don't eat or ever make meatloaf

                          1. re: suzigirl

                            This is funny, my mom's meatloaf was the only savory recipe I called her to get! My Dad was the cook, my Mom did the baking. Her meatloaf though.... amazing!!

                            1. re: kubasd

                              Would you share the amazing meatloaf recipe? I would love to add another recipe into the mix. And being an affordable meat will make it a plus

                              1. re: kubasd

                                Can I have the amazing meatloaf recipe? I would like to add another budget friendly dinner to my list.

                                1. re: suzigirl

                                  Some recipes recommend cooking the onions first claiming they will never cook enough in the meatloaf, but my mom never did and I've never noticed them being raw...

                                  My Mom's Meatloaf

                                  1 lb ground beef
                                  1/2 lb pork
                                  (alternatively 1/2 lb each of beef, pork, and veal)
                                  1 cup seasoned breadcrumbs
                                  1 cup milk
                                  1 egg (beaten)
                                  1/2 cup diced onion
                                  1/4 tsp each of pepper, celery salt, garlic powder, dried mustard, and ground sage
                                  1 tbsp Worchestershire sauce.

                                  Mix it all up (taking care not to overwork it) Hands work best.
                                  Dived mixture into two ungreased 9 x 5 x 3 loaf pans and back at 350 degrees for 90 minutes. There will be some grease in the pan around the loaves, but I just pour it off.

                                  I was skeptical with the dried spices, but the combo of them works :)

                                  1. re: kubasd

                                    I think it also depends on how fine you chop the onions. I actually puree raw onions before adding them to my meatball mixture. My daughter hates the texture of onions, but onions give such enormous flavor, so the puree does the trick. I think if you also finely dice, that helps as well. I made larger diced onions in my turkey burgers, and she could taste them, and she didn't like them.

                                    1. re: Tudor_rose

                                      haha I have an onion hater in my house, too, but I had to make him a separate meatloaf with no onion or else he wouldn't touch it! I minced onions so finely one time in a thanksgiving stuffing. He took one bite and freaked out that I'd lied about onions and wouldn't eat it.... ah well, his loss!

                                    2. re: kubasd

                                      Thank you so much. Very nice of you. Next time you make it put stale bread under the meatloaf in the pan and it soaks up the fat.I use regular white bread slices. Will post back when I try it. :-)

                                      1. re: suzigirl

                                        Ya know, I was going to suggest that in my post as I'd heard about it, but haven't made meatloaf since I read the tip. :P

                                          1. re: melpy

                                            You can use fresh or leave some sit on the counter while your prepping all the ingredienrs.

                  2. The original comment has been removed
                    1. Meat loaf
                      Baked ham
                      Lasagne

                      Not seen on my table for a long time.

                      1 Reply
                      1. re: AdamD

                        My mother usually had christmas dinner and for several years she made lasagna and it was ALWAYS burned. MIL's lasagna wasn't but she got the Costco size stouffer's lasagna, so I've clearly been traumatized by homemade lasagna and have never tried to make it. Which is a shame because I love lasagna done right.

                      2. The original comment has been removed
                        1. Frozen French fries or compressed potato scrap food product. (Think "Tater Tots") Mom used to do the in the oven. I don't eat them often enough for them to earn a space in my freezer. If I crave French fries I go down to the local fish joint and get an order of his.

                          2 Replies
                          1. re: al b. darned

                            Ah, now I have a small place in my heart for Tater Tots. I haven't had them in a very long time but I remember liking them as a kid.

                            1. re: Crockett67

                              We had some last weekend - they are really good, in the way that so many foods with no redeeming nutritional qualities are. I'll take them over french fries any day.