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how to keep broccoli warm without it being mushy?

I plan to serve ever-so fresh steamed broccoli with butter and garlic at an open house/dinner type event at which people will come and eat at various different times. So, I will need to keep the broccoli warm. Is there a way to do this without it turning mushy?

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  1. I have kept broccoli over cooling-off steaming water without a lid for short periods, but probably not long enough for your purposes.

    Maybe you should roast it and serve it at room temperature?

    1 Reply
    1. re: sandylc

      Yea, I thought about that and that I might have to sacrifice since I don't really enjoy room temperature or cold broccoli.

    2. Could you just cook it for a bit less time to keep it from getting too soft? Then again I like the stuff even raw so maybe that won't work. : )
      JeremyEG
      HomeCookLocavore.com

      1 Reply
      1. re: JeremyEG

        Yea, I could definitely do that as well as it will probably sit for at least a bit before the 1st round of people show up. While I don't like cold broccoli, I do like my broccoli to have a bit of crunch as well.

      2. If you use olive oil instead of butter, that dish is something you would see for hours at an Italian restaurant antipasto buffet.

        2 Replies
        1. re: escondido123

          Warm I assume? Just keep warm over simmering water?

          1. re: fldhkybnva

            Not warm, room temp. I don't remember ever seeing it kept warm on an Italian buffet.

        2. What's wrong with room temp steamed broccoli?

          I think I actually prefer it that way, now that I think about it.

          3 Replies
            1. re: ipsedixit

              There is nothing wrong with it, I just don't like it

            2. Cook the broccoli to desired doneness, then chill rapidly in ice water, set aside. When ready to start plating throw back into a large pot of boiling water to bring it back up to temp.

              1. Blanch the lot in salted water, then shock. Keep a pot of water simmering and do batches as you need them. Should only need a quick dip. Any other attempt to keep them warm will result in a mushy mess.

                1. I think I would try bringing (salted) water to a boil, putting in the broccoli, and then turning off the heat. You might want to do a dry run, though, in case you actually need to boil it for a minute or two before turning it off.