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Kuala Lumpur - Pig's Blood Pudding at Hutong Lot 10

I was walking past this "yong tau fu" stall at Hutong Lot 10 this evening when I saw cubes of pig's blood pudding as one of the available ingredients for the assemble-it-yourself "yong tau fu". For a moment, I thought "Hey, *when* did Singapore lift the ban of consumption of pig's blood" (banned since 1999) - then, silly me, I forgot that I'm actually in Kuala Lumpur at the moment: where one *can* still get pig's blood pudding for our "yong tau fu".

So I selected for myself a few choice cubes of pig's blood pudding, plus a selection of other tofu & vegetable items. Oh Gawd, bliss!

P.S. - Also had a plate of "chee cheong fun" from the same stall.

 
 
 
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  1. The photos posted on the stall showed the stallowner-chef with some local celebrity customers: Malaysian TV food critic Jason Yeoh aka Axian, Malaysia's internationally-renowned shoe designer Jimmy Choo, HK-based food critic Chua Lam and the billionaire-owner of Hutong Lot 10 Francis Yeoh.

    4 Replies
    1. re: klyeoh

      The owner (presumably the figure common to all four pictures) is on the diminutive side, it looks like. :-)

      1. re: huiray

        LOL! There goes the "Never trust a skinny cook" advice.

        1. re: klyeoh

          Is there a "mother ship" for this stall, and is the skinny owner at this stall in Lot 10 regularly? (i.e. QC is then maintained)

          1. re: huiray

            I'd not noticed this stall much before, perhas because it's kocated at one of the auieter ends of Hutong Lot 10 - not one of the more "legendary" stalls. Have to go back one day & find out more.

    2. So there's at least one stall in Hutong Lot 10 that isn't bad?

      Hmm, I haven't had pig blood ["jyu1 hung4"; 豬紅] in a while. Partly because it's really only freshly curdled stuff that is delectable, "aged" stuff / packaged stuff is a little icky and rubbery...

      7 Replies
      1. re: huiray

        Oh, there are 2 other stalls I liked there: Ho Weng Kee's wanton noodles and the Penang fried koay teow.

        Other than that, I'd rather go to nearby Jalan Alor or Jalan Imbi for the more authentic tastes to be found there.

        1. re: klyeoh

          Oh yes, I'd forgotten about that Penang "char koay teow" stall, the one where penang_rojak (I think - or was it you?) commented about how the skinny :-) guy there even had a "Penang" look, whatever that was. :-)

          1. re: huiray

            The guy I saw most frequently frying koay teow there actually looked Myanmarese. Come to think of it - he's probably Myanmarese!!

            1. re: klyeoh

              Heh. I went looking...http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8509... so I guess you don't see that skinny chap there much, then - but, rather, that Genghiz-Khan-ish chap you mention? :-D

              1. re: huiray

                This guy i see most often these days is a shorter guy - he's different from the other 2 guys and is probably trained to do their job. Local chefs now get Myanmarese understudy/assistants to do all the cookihg for them!

          2. re: klyeoh

            Agreed, Ho Weng Kee's wanton mee is awesome. I love the charred, fatty char siew.

            I used to frequent Koon Kee at Jalan Hang Lekir for wanton mee in the 80s, but I haven't been back for ages. I loved the crunchy texture of their noodles. Wonder how it's holding up today.

            1. re: Julian Teoh

              Koon Kee is still doing very good business when I walked past 2 weeks ago - totally packed to the brim at lunch-time on Saturday :-)