HOME > Chowhound > Cookware >

Discussion

saute pan question

  • 31
  • Share

I am trying to decide between two 11" copper saute pans and could really use some advice, since it is a big investment for me. Mauviel Cuprinox is 2mm thick. I am getting the pan with 2 helper handles instead of the long one because of back problems. e-dehillerin has the same pan at 2.5 mm thick. Cost is a little less for the E-deh if ordered from France. Could they both be made by the same company? I have read posts saying that the difference in the copper thickness is negligible. Both come with lids and are stainless lined. Mauviel has ss handles and the E-Deh. is iron or brass. Any glaring problems or differences? I have an electric (not induction) range. Please advise.

  1. Click to Upload a photo (10 MB limit)
Delete
Posting Guidelines | FAQs | Feedback
Cancel
  1. Hi Ikristin,

    I'm sure other more knowledgeable folks will chime in in this, but let me offer my thoughts. Thicker will be better. I've not used 2mm copper, but I see marked difference between my 3.5mm and 3mm pans, and the 3mm pans show an even more marked difference over 2.5mm, so I would assume that 2.5mm would be even more noticeably better than 2mm, especially for sauteing, and especially at 11". 11" requires a lot of conductivity for most standard home burners. In short, absolutely get the 2.5mm.

    Regarding the same company, Mauviel makes copper pots and pans in several thicknesses. You will sometimes see the same exact pan in 1.5mm, 2mm, and 2.5mm.

    Are you set on stainless-lined copper? I ask, because you can often find 3-3.5mm thick tin-lined copper saute's for the same (or less) than 2.5mm stainless-lined. And many who use tin prefer it to stainless. For me, this would be especially so in a saute. Stainless might be preferable in a saucier, windsor, or roaster, but I'd take tin over stainless in a saute any day. (I just realized that a helper handle is crucial, so maybe you don't want a good-old-super-thick pan, because they never had helper handles.)

    I prefer iron handles to stainless or brass. Stainless usually only appears on thinner copper, and I think it has a funky look. Brass gets hot fast, even during a quick saute session. On a stock pot it doesn't matter, because anything will get blazing hot over a few hours, but an iron handle resists heating well enough that you can often avoid a hot pad after a quick cooking session. (You will need a hot pad for the helper though pretty much no matter what.) As a general guideline, you will find iron handles on the thickest pans.

    One final thing to consider. E. Dehillerin has tremendous resale value (as does Falk). So, if everything else is equal, I would select Dehillerin or Falk over Mauviel, simply because, if you decide that it's not the right pan and you want to sell it, you will get more of your dollars back with those two brands.

    I hope this helps!

    Jeremy

    4 Replies
    1. re: jljohn

      Thank you! This helps the decision. I'll pick the E. Dehillerin.

      1. re: lkristin

        Are you ordering direct from France? What is the process like? How expensive is it to ship and get through US Customs?

        1. re: Sid Post

          I emailed them asking for a quote. It is about half what Mauviel wanted for a 2mm pan. Adding 114 for shipping makes it about 50 less for the 2.5 mm E. Deh. over the 2mm Mauviel. I now have to fax or email them my credit card number and info. Hopefully that won't be a mistake, but old posts didn't mention any problems.

          1. re: lkristin

            Don't email unless you have no other option. Email bounces all over the world. Air mail or a fax are fast and more secure.

            If you get the E Deh pan, I will look forward to your review. I'm tempted to get one myself.

    2. I have the thick Mauviel Cuprinox pans myself. If you have back problems, I would seriously reconsider the copper pans. They are really heavy EMPTY. Now add some food weight and ask yourself if you really want to & can SAFELY lift a pan that heavy.

      That being said, I would definitely opt for the heaviest stainless lined coper pan I could afford. If you have a really good heat source, or you haven't tried a lot of good pans I guess the difference might not be a big deal. However, consider why the French use thicker copper.

      In terms of who makes the pans, Falk from Belgium owns the stainless copper lamination process and production equipment so, it's all starting from the same source. Handles and rivets are where the differences are in addition to the brushed or polished finishes.

      Have you considered a different material for your saute pan? Why are you looking for copper specifically versus something else? I'm leaning towards Demeyere Atlantis today to round out my cookware needs/wants. Welded handles with no rivets is nice when you hand wash. Stainless steel is low maintainance and stands up to kitchen knocks and bumps better then copper (do you really want to spend the effort, time, and attention to keep your copper looking pretty?). A high end pan like the Demeyere Atlantis really does cook very well and I look forward to adding a couple of new pieces to my kitchen to further "test drive" the technology Demeyere uses.

      11 Replies
      1. re: Sid Post

        Falk didn't have any helper handles, but I'm glad to hear they start from the same source. This pan has 2 small handles instead of one long, so I'm hoping the back will be ok lifting it up with both hands close to my body. I have a couple Le Creuset that I lift that way and I can usually get away with it if I'm not reaching outwards. Thank you!

        1. re: lkristin

          http://www.copperpans.com/facosapa1.html

          11" has a helper.

          1. re: jljohn

            I offer this just in case you really wanted a Falk. I, personally, would choose E. Dehillerin over Falk.

            1. re: jljohn

              Thank you! my mind is at ease now.

              1. re: jljohn

                Why? What's better about their pan?

                1. re: Sid Post

                  See my post below--basically QC issues. (And I prefer polished to brushed.)

              2. re: jljohn

                The ones I viewed didn't. Was this from the factory? Anyway, I should stop while I'm ahead unless there is a Falk advantage I need to know about.

                1. re: lkristin

                  From the US distributor.

                  The Falk folks would tout their brushed finish as an advantage, as it is "easier to maintain." I, however, don't think that it is actually any easier, and I prefer the look of polished to brushed. Also, I've experienced what I perceived to be QC issues with two of the three Falk items I've ordered (including a wobbly 11" saute pan), so I'd be hesitant to purchase from them.

            2. re: Sid Post

              I almost went with the Atlantis. I liked the conductivity of silver, but I didn't really want magnetized. Just my own hangup.

              1. re: lkristin

                This may come as a shock, but during my research of 11 to 13 inch sauté pans I found that the Atlantis from Demeyere was one of, if not the heaviest, in the class. According to my table, the Atlantis comes in at 10 lbs 8 oz, while the 2mm Mauviel Copper comes in at 9 lbs 7 oz. Both are 11 inch diameter pans. The Demeyere was $170 less expensive than the Mauviel. My point being, you would not save any weight with the Atlantis sauté pan and I don't believe it comes with the two loop handles. I ended up with the Viking V-7 which weighed only 7 lbs for a 13 inch pan and was on sale and less expensive than the Atlantis. The Viking comes with the two loop handles in both the 3 qt. (11") and 6 qt. (13") versions. I jsut thought the Atlantis was too heavy to deal with when full.

                1. re: mikie

                  Thank you!

            3. Hi, lkristin:

              If you haven't already, definitely get the Dehillerin. That 2.5mm is actually 2.3mm copper and 0.2mm SS, and the Mauviel 2mm is more like 1.8mm of copper. You would notice the difference.

              You are smart to get the rondeau version--it is a very versatile shape. Ease of carrying, fits in the oven, presents at table nicely, travels well. Different tossing technique, if that's important to you.

              Out of curiosity, what is the total cost of the ED pan, including delivery?

              Aloha,
              Kaleo

              4 Replies
              1. re: kaleokahu

                My quote was 391.08. I asked for it in dollars, so I hope that is what it is. Thanks for all the advice.

                1. re: lkristin

                  Bad news. Just confirmed the quote was in Euro, so it is 505 today. That makes it $50 more for this over the 2mm Mauviel. I think I'll still get the E. Deh. Thanks for all the advice.

                  1. re: lkristin

                    How did you contact them, and do you speak French? I emailed them a while back about ordering two pans and never heard back.

                    1. re: jljohn

                      No French. I emailed first to info@e-dehillerin.fr They asked for the page I was looking at online and I sent it to them. There was an error on their website about the size of the pan, so I asked them to confirm the size. They have responded and I have been replying to messagerie wanadoo <e-dehillerin@wanadoo.fr

              2. I will heartily second Kaleo. My oldest pan, a heavy sauté pan with iron handle and tin lining, has been in regular use for 37 years without need of re-tinning. The challenges of tin are IMO seriously overstated. As long a there is food in the pan the risk of bubbling is more or less purely theoretical. It sticks less than SS. Just get some of those two buck French wooden spatulas and maybe a silicone whisk. cupretam is way cheaper than cuprinox. It is also quickly getting harder to find. The things I have seen from Dehillerin look like badged Mauviel.

                8 Replies
                1. re: tim irvine

                  Williams Sonoma in store had the same pan I am looking at in tinned Mauviel. Don't remember the price.

                  1. re: lkristin

                    Hi, lkristin:

                    If you want to save some $$$, you might look at this supposedly new, 3mm tinned rondeau for $399 (maybe less if you bid). http://www.ebay.com/itm/-/32099150212...

                    Aloha,
                    Kaleo

                    1. re: kaleokahu

                      Thanks! I'll take a peek

                      1. re: lkristin

                        Let us know what you decided and how it works for you.

                        1. re: kaleokahu

                          I finally decided on the E. Deh. with the stainless lining. I'm sure the Mauviel even tinned would have been fantastic, but I'll not likely do this again, so there it is. I faxed over my info and am really excited to see what shows up. I'll write when it does. (Watch the quote, however. I asked for dollars and it was euros when I asked again).

                          1. re: kaleokahu

                            Okay! The pan arrived today and it is lovely! It is perfect in every way - very flat bottom. It is labeled Mauviel Cuprinox 2.5mm but it has the Dehillerin stamp. I can't wait to try it out. Thanks again for all the great advice.

                            1. re: lkristin

                              Hi, kristin:

                              Congratulations! Many years of happy cooking in it.

                              If you have not already used it, consider "seasoning" your new pan. I put the word in quotes because it is nothing like seasoning a CI pan. If you do this, you should notice food sticking less than normal.

                              Wash it with dilute soapy water and dry it thoroughly with either paper towels or air dry. Then coat the entire interior with vegetable oil or shortening. Heat until hot but short of the oil smoking. Turn off heat and let it stand as-is, overnight. Pour out the oil. Put 1T of fine seasalt in the pan and heat lightly. With a towel, rub the salt into the entire interior surface of the pan. Wipe out all of the salt and STOP--do not wash the pan. It's now seasoned. Treat the pan like a wok--just wipe it out if at all possible. If you need to use soap and water, repeat the seasoning.

                              Aloha,
                              Kaleo

                              1. re: kaleokahu

                                Thank you again! I will copy this and follow your advice.