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WHAT DID YOU EAT AFTER THE FAST?

Okay, I'll start it off.

Me: iced decaf and plum cake (I'll probably have some butternut squash soup in a little while).

My daughter: a banana, ice water, pasta with meat sauce

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  1. I know that I am atypical.

    First, a belt of whiskey (before leaving shul). Then at home I break on fleischiges. I had chopped liver. Turkey rice soup and meat knishes. A little honey cake and black coffee. Assorted family members had pareves: Tuna salad, whitefish salad, egg salad, etc. Then the younger ones were off to a party at my SIL's where it was milchiges. I'm enjoying the quiet time.

    6 Replies
      1. re: bagelman01

        I have a dear friend in Baltimore who always breaks with a martini.

        The fleishik stuff is interesting, never heard of that for break fast.

        1. re: Bob W

          I believe it is the chasidic custom (at least, that's what my husband, who is of chasidic origins told me when he thought it might lead to brisket after the fast --ugh). The point is that it is supposed to be a festive meal, in which we celebrate that our sins have been forgiven and theoretically a festive meal is supposed to include meat. There are people who would consider it sacrilege not to have a fleishig bris meal, for the same reason.

          1. re: JackieR

            I'm from a long line of Litvak Misnagdim, just really don't like milchiges.
            My mother always served us 2 meat meals everyday (and her side is German High Reform).

            1. re: JackieR

              Interesting, thanks. No chasids in my family tree!

            2. re: Bob W

              My family had been chassidic, from Munkacz, before the war.
              After the fast we always sat down to the equivalent of a Shabbos meal. soup, chicken etc. It was a revelation when I started dating my very American husband, whose family always had a big smoked fish and bagels meal, with all the accoutrements. My parents happily picked up on this custom, and now many years later, I can't imagine anything but milichigs.

          2. Deviled eggs, creamed herring, bagel lox and cream cheese, tomato and onion on the 1/2 bagel too, coffee, water, and just a teensy sip of wine for kiddish.

            1. At shul: a little orange juice and a couple of mini-Entenmann's things.

              At home: a small bowl of Cinnamon Oat Squares with skim milk, then a bowl of garlicky butternut squash soup in which I poached an egg.

              1 Reply
              1. re: GilaB

                And my husband ate seuda leftovers - soggy broccoli/cauliflower tempura with sesame-soy dipping sauce, and schnitzels. He does this ever year. It leaves me shaking my head.

              2. Very traditional - bagels, cream cheese, belly lox, whitefish, tomato, crackers and cheese, fruit, and the Spouse's birthday cake. One of the young women at shul was hosting a pizza party tonite. I think you have to be young to do that. Just the idea of pizza makes me feel ill, even though that's how we always broke when I was in college.

                1. chocolate babka and a glass of water. after that, leftovers from yesterday - some chicken soup, some meat and potatoes -