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Sunpentown induction, anyone?

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GH1618 Sep 25, 2012 03:27 PM

I'm considering asking Santa for a single-hob portable induction cooktop this year. I've resisted these for awhile now, because I haven't found one that seems right to me. A common limitation is that most seem to have only nine or ten power (or heat) levels, when it seems that giving finer control would cost next to nothing for a device of this type.

However I have recently noticed that the Sunpentown SR-1891B has twenty levels. This seems enough to me. Does anyone have this model? I would like to know how the quality is and whether there are any drawbacks in the way it operates.

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    unprofessional_chef RE: GH1618 Sep 25, 2012 04:35 PM

    " A common limitation is that most seem to have only nine or ten power (or heat) levels, when it seems that giving finer control would cost next to nothing for a device of this type. However I have recently noticed that the Sunpentown SR-1891B has twenty levels."

    If you deep fry, finer temperature control might help. With 20 power levels I doubt you'll notice a huge difference between each power level. If they had 40 power levels... do you realize how many times you'd have to tap the controls to go from high to low and vice versa? LOL Even with the aid of the 3 quick lunch buttons. Of course, that's an extreme where there are so many levels it's more of a handicap.

    I think this is the Sunpentown SR-964TB unit:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8zXdP...

    Sunpentown makes commercial units so they've got that going for them. But I prefer a unit were the glass covers entire cooktop. For easy cleaning purposes.

    1 Reply
    1. re: unprofessional_chef
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      GH1618 RE: unprofessional_chef Sep 25, 2012 04:59 PM

      Exactly. There should be enough steps so that it is difficult to tell the difference between them. The ten step model I was looking at previously has a minimum temperature of 150 °F and 30° steps. This seems too coarse to me. As for 40 levels, I wrote that 20 seemed enough. I'll add that the 120 °F minimum of the Sunpentown 20-step model seems more useful.

    2. paulj RE: GH1618 Sep 25, 2012 05:44 PM

      Amazon says 20 power levels, 3 temperature.

      Have you found an online users manual? The MaxBurton manual lists the 'temperatures' and power settings. The 10 levels on MB are enough, they just aren't fine enough at the low power settings. I don't need 5 levels of fast boil, but could use 5 levels of simmer.

      Off hand I don't see anything that make me prefer it to the MB that I already have.

      My experience with the MB is that temperature settings are of limited value. The sensor is under the glass, so there is an inevitable difference between its reading and the temperature of the contents of the pan.

      2 Replies
      1. re: paulj
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        GH1618 RE: paulj Sep 25, 2012 05:48 PM

        It is three temperature settings for the "keep warm" function. There are some sources which have a manual, but unfortunately they are all for the older model!

        1. re: paulj
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          GH1618 RE: paulj Sep 25, 2012 05:53 PM

          The minimum temperature on the MB 6000 is 140 °F, then it goes up to about 170 °F. The Sunpentown seems to be 120, 135' 150, ... (approximately). It could be unequal steps, but I doubt it.

        2. kaleokahu RE: GH1618 Sep 25, 2012 06:32 PM

          Hi, GH1618:

          Finally! 20 power levels within a 1300W spectrum. That is finer control than "20" would indicate for a 1500W or 1800W unit. A simple rheostat/knob would be better, but this comes pretty close...

          I look forward to your review if the sleigh drops one off at Chateau GH.

          Aloha,
          Kaleo

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            GH1618 RE: GH1618 Sep 27, 2012 04:29 PM

            I finally found a manual for the SR-1891B. The differences from the SR-964TB (or TS) are interesting. The 964 has a lower bottom end (100w compared to 300w) but inly seven power levels, increasing by 200w per step. But in temperature mode it has 13 levels, six of them above boiling. The temperature levels start at 100°F and go up in 20° steps. On the 1891, there are only three temperature settings, 140, 167, and 194°F. It's not obvious to me which pattern is better. I suppose it depends on what use is made of it.

            1 Reply
            1. re: GH1618
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              unprofessional_chef RE: GH1618 Sep 27, 2012 05:41 PM

              More lower power levels gives you more options for simmering as paulj mentioned. Or for delicate recipes that contain eggs or cream. More high power levels might be useful for deep frying.

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