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rattlesnake recipes

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vicky_b Sep 22, 2012 08:39 PM

We have lots of snakes here in the desert, and I always end up with a few beauties once the cold starts coming in the fall... so wanted to see if anyone else has some scrumptious snake recipes for the fall season?

So far this is my favorite, so I'll share this one, but looking for a new twist... this is from Maggie Rosaine's bdoutdoors blog (these guys have great fish recipes, too bad I'm landlocked!)

RATTLESNAKE CAKES
1 Pound of rattlesnake meat (rattlesnake meat is available online if hunting them isn't your thing. I use Southeastern Diamond Backs.)
½ Tsp Cajun seasoning
¼ Cup finely chopped Vidalia onion
1 Tbsp Dijon mustard
½ Cup toasted sesame seeds
1 Hass avocado pit removed
½ Roasted sweet red pepper
½ Cup sweet chili sauce
1 Tsp soy sauce
¼ Tsp wasabe paste
Canola oil for frying
DIRECTIONS
Process or grind the rattlesnake meat until it's the consistency of hamburger.
Add the Cajun seasoning, onion and Dijon mustard and mix well.
Form the mixture into small balls and flatten them to make cakes. Gently roll each cake in the toasted sesame seeds.
Refrigerate the cakes for a least one hour to let them set up.
Heat your canola oil in a medium-sized skillet. Start with your oil on medium heat and switch it to low once the oil is hot to make sure the sesame seeds do not burn. Panfry the cakes in the canola oil until lightly browned, turning once.
Mix the last chili sauce, soy sauce and wasabi paste together to form a dippin' sauce to serve with the snake cakes. Adjust the wasabe to meet your heat tolerance.
Serve the cakes warm with a cube of roasted red pepper and avocado on top. Drizzle a little of the sauce beside the cakes for dipping.
These cakes are a great cocktail food or serve them as a starter. Trust me, they will make a great conversation piece — especially if you hunted the snake on your own!

thankssssss in advance!

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  1. todao RE: vicky_b Sep 22, 2012 10:15 PM

    Remove the head; skin it; clean it; wash it; wind it around a stick; sprinkle with salt and pepper; hold over an open fire until done. Pairs well with a cold beer.

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