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Brisket Spring Rolls

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Okay, I know it sounds weird, but just listen...

I have a pretty fair amount of leftover brisket (Jewish-style) from the holidays. I need to bring a non-dairy dish to a pre-fast meal next week and The Spouse suggested brisket spring rolls. The problem is, neither of us knows where to take this. Easy enought to shred the brisket, and I'm thinking I'll add sauteed mushrooms. I was even thinking of adding cooked fine egg noodles in a riff on using glass noodles in Thai spring rolls, but I'm thinking that's overkill. I'd like to bake, rather than fry, since we'll have to transport and reheat.

Any ideas what vegetables to add to this spring roll? Also, do you think this calls for a dipping sauce and, if so, what? As long as it's non-dairy.

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  1. You could take it in a BBQ direction and add sauteed coleslaw mix and a little BBQ sauce, or maybe in a "reuben" direction with some sauerkraut and a little mustard?

    1. I would go with a BBQ direction. Mostly brisket, cabbage, carrots. Add in something spicy for contrast. Maybe a homemade BBQ sauce, a little spicy, for dipping.

      1. I probably add that this is the brisket recipe that I used:
        http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

        Do you still think that BBQ would work? I like the cabbage and carrot suggestions.

        And thanks, everyone, for not doing any "TurBriskEfil" jokes. I know I'm dying to. :-)

        2 Replies
        1. re: rockycat

          Absolutely - there are no strong competing flavors in that recipe at all. You could go any direction you want with it!

          1. re: rockycat

            The brisket recipe seems perfect for what you're getting it. Are you including the onions in the filling?

            Husband loves brisket egg rolls, and I've tasted my share of them. Most seem to have very finely shredded meat so that you're not biting into a chunk of something.

            Just noticed you plan to reheat... Maybe mix some sauce in with the meat so it's not dry

          2. Instead of a spring roll, how about incorporating the brisket into a summer roll? You can make it earlier in the day and not worry about transporting. I sometimes grill a steak and then slice it real thin and put about two or three slices it in my summer rolls.

            http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/foo...

            1. I would worry about the spring rolls getting soggy after reheating. Instead, what about trying a cold spring roll? Along the lines of the Vietnamese rolls in rice paper?

              I'm thinking brisket with a vinegar coleslaw with bbq sauce for dipping? Or maybe Asian-inspired with strips of cucumber, carrot, maybe glass noodles and a mixture of mint and cilatro dipped in peanut sauce?

              Also, I've baked spring rolls a few times but am always disappointed. They're good but it's the wonderful greasiness of frying them makes them so good sometimes!

              Good luck!

              1. Rather than spring rolls, I would go with dumplings. There was a recipe in the NYT that called for using braise short ribs but I don't see why you couldn't use brisket. Really very good. Pan fry them, pack them up and reheat in a microwave. Won't be a crisp as when fresh, but should still be good.

                Here is the link http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/24/din...

                1. Following up on the results: Bottom line, the springrolls were a big hit. I used the previously mentioned leftover brisket and my favorite vinegar cole slaw
                  http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes...
                  using half the onion and substituting 2 carrots for the green pepper, as I usually do. We served the traditional Jewish way, with duck sauce and Chinese mustard. We ended up shallow frying and reheating in the oven.

                  The rolls never re-crisped in the oven but the taste was still terrific. The rolls earned kudos all around and will definitely get made again. I might not shred the cabbage quite so finely again, though. Also, I would make my own hot mustard as the jarred Chinese mustard was nowhere near as hot as I remember it being.