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A surfeit of quince

t
tardigrade Sep 8, 2012 12:47 AM

My quince tree is going crazy this year, and I'm in need of suggestions as to how to use the fruit. I pare, slice and freeze a lot of them for cobblers and pies in winter, but there's only so much quince paste I can take. Any suggestions? I have one recipe for a quince/lamb stew: other savory suggestions are welcome.

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  1. chefj RE: tardigrade Sep 8, 2012 11:34 AM

    Paula Wolfert Has a great Tangine that uses Quince.
    Quince Jam And Jelly are a great way to preserve it.
    Kidoni Gliko Greek Quince preserves
    A search on Iranian recipes, They are big on quince in Iran.
    https://www.google.com/search?num=30&...

    1. steinpilz RE: tardigrade Sep 8, 2012 05:30 PM

      I was thinking of quince recently after seeing these recipes:

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddri...

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddri...

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddri...

      1. ipsedixit RE: tardigrade Oct 30, 2012 07:50 AM

        Made curd.

        3 Replies
        1. re: ipsedixit
          babette feasts RE: ipsedixit Nov 5, 2012 10:16 AM

          How? Juice them?

          1. re: babette feasts
            ipsedixit RE: babette feasts Nov 5, 2012 10:41 AM

            Like this: http://www.abc.net.au/tasmania/storie...

            1. re: ipsedixit
              babette feasts RE: ipsedixit Nov 5, 2012 11:09 AM

              looks yummy

        2. greygarious RE: tardigrade Oct 30, 2012 09:42 AM

          Could you slice and dry it, then grind some of it into powder? That's a space-saving route to long-term storage. Dried slices and powders are easy additions to sauces, compotes, and the like.

          1 Reply
          1. re: greygarious
            Lauriero RE: greygarious Oct 30, 2012 10:58 AM

            I could probably do that--could be really interesting. Drying fruit in my area (Near Seattle) is tricky since things are so...moist around here.

            I Ike the curd idea for some of it. But seriously, most recipes call for 1-3 pounds of fruit, and I have so much more than that.

            I started a batch of quince caramels and jelly this morning. I am going to add chutney and at least one batch of curd to the list. Will make some of the Persian lime syrup for drinks as well--and someone else linked me to This http://www.foodinjars.com/2011/12/qui... which looks yummy too.

          2. s
            sr44 RE: tardigrade Oct 30, 2012 11:14 AM

            Paula Wolfert has a recipe for baked quince that would take care of a lot.

            Alas, no quince for me this year. Crop failure from a late spring freeze.

            1. a
              andrewtree RE: tardigrade Oct 30, 2012 05:42 PM

              Dulce de membrillo/quince 'cheese'. Cook them slowly with water and sugar, it will set into a firm jelly that will last a very long time and can be added to all sorts of sweet and savoury dishes

              1. geekmom RE: tardigrade Nov 5, 2012 10:12 AM

                For a savory recipe, there's a salad in Ottolenghi's "Plenty" that has quince and gorgonzola. It looks gorgeous, and I'm not really a big fan of gorgonzola; I'll be giving it a try.

                I finally got some quince fruit on Saturday from my CSA farmer who grows it; his crop came in pretty late this year. I plan to make a lot of jam but I wanted to try some other ideas too. Thanks for the tip about Persian cooking, chefj; I didn't even think of looking in my Persian cookbook but I see now that there are six quince recipes in there.

                Last night for dessert I made baked quince, where you peel and halve the quince and lay them out in a baking dish, pour over a mixture of honey and red wine, add some spices (cloves, star anise and a vanilla bean) then bake (first covered in foil, then with the foil removed to reduce the liquid). The recipe came from "Gregg's Favourite Puddings" by Gregg Wallace which I bought from Amazon UK. It works well as a dessert course after a Sunday roast dinner, because you've got the oven on anyway and can just leave the quinces in there for an hour or so while your meat, veg etc are cooking, and occasionally baste them when you think of it. The red wine/honey mixture not only infuses the fruit, but also reduces into an absolutely gorgeous spiced syrup which we drizzled over homemade vanilla ice cream that I served with the baked quince. A truly fantastic and very easy dessert.

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