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Hot, dry summer

gaffk Sep 7, 2012 06:23 PM

Has anyone else noticed a difference in their gardens from this hot, dry summer? Tomatoes are small and inedible. But my parsley, oregano and basil are growing like weeds (I swear the basil has grown larger than my hydrangea). My usually mild halapenos are hotter and bigger than ever. My weed-like mint has withered.

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    Chefpaulo RE: gaffk Sep 7, 2012 06:31 PM

    Outside of Philadelphia, we have gigantic juicy tomatoes and an abundance of all else. Sorry to hear of your plight. Where are you?
    CP

    1 Reply
    1. re: Chefpaulo
      gaffk RE: Chefpaulo Sep 7, 2012 06:50 PM

      I too am outside of Philly. Strangely my garden was best when inside Philly (easier to water and no deer in sight). But all plants with scents are good.

    2. deet13 RE: gaffk Sep 7, 2012 06:34 PM

      Heh, that all depends on where your garden is located. Down here in Florida it's been anything but a dry summer. As for hot, meh, it's the same oppressive heat and humidity as always.

      My okra plants have been growing like weeds, and so are my pole beans, squash, and tomato vines. I'd like to say my herb garden did well this year, but my wife's goats got into my herb garden and tore through it like a school of short-horned, bleating, furry little piranhas...

      5 Replies
      1. re: deet13
        Veggo RE: deet13 Sep 7, 2012 07:27 PM

        That could make for a tasty goat. I'm in Bradenton, and my mint always fails.

        1. re: Veggo
          deet13 RE: Veggo Sep 7, 2012 08:05 PM

          Spearmint grows pretty well in the shaded spots in my backyard, provided the season has been fairly wet (we're north of Tampa, up by the Croom WMA).

          My wife's little pygmy goats graze on the mint like there's no tomorrow. You can always tell when the does have been nibbling on it, because their milk ends up tasting a bit, "minty".

          As for eating my wife's goats, she'd whoop the tar out of me with the first thing she could lay her hands on. :)

          1. re: deet13
            Tripeler RE: deet13 Sep 7, 2012 08:31 PM

            Does she make goat cheese from their milk? A slightly minty flavor may be welcome in soft goat cheese.

            1. re: Tripeler
              deet13 RE: Tripeler Sep 7, 2012 09:17 PM

              Right now, the pygmies are only giving a few pounds of milk per day (a quart or so, when the girls are having a good day). So until a couple of the younger kids grow older, the milk yield will be fairly low.

              My son ends up drinking most of the milk we get from the does. Any leftovers are churned into butter, used for cooking, or turned into White Russians.

              So I haven't gotten around to saving enough milk for farmers cheese yet; but that is on my list of items to do once the kids start producing milk, and after we get the aquaponics system set up and running properly...

              1. re: deet13
                Tripeler RE: deet13 Sep 8, 2012 01:22 AM

                A friend of mine in California runs a goat farm and makes several kinds of cheese. Before he was licensed he sold it as "pet food" at the local farmer's market, but he is licensed as a dairy now. He makes a cheese like Parmesan from goat milk that is truly superb. Good luck with your goats!

      2. d
        dfrostnh RE: gaffk Sep 10, 2012 04:16 AM

        It was a hot, dry summer here in NH, too. I watered the veggie garden sparingly as we are on a well. Weekends only, too, since I work. The tomatoes are fine. It's a fantasik year for peppers. Zucchini pooped out early. Everything else seems to be ok. As long as things got enough water when they were germinating, they didn't seem to need much water later on. Herb plants by the kitchen porch never got any water. After cutting back lemon balm, sorrel and lovage, all have grown back and look very healthy. I don't think the Amish paste tomatoes got as big as in past years.

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