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Hi-Temp roasting of cherry Tomatoes?

Hi! after spending an hour blanching cherry tomatoes on the stove, I wonder...
Could I just cut 'em in half, put 'em on a broiling rack, and broil them for about 10 minutes?

Would the skins come off easily after that?

Are there any oven methods that make the skins come off?

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  1. Do you want to make the skins easy to remove or fall off during the roasting process? Removing tomato skins is quite simple with blanching and they can be roasted once they're peeled. Or they can be roasted with skins on until the skins blister (similar to roasting peppers) and the skins removed after the fact. Frankly, I prefer to blanch and peel prior to oven roasting.

    1 Reply
    1. re: todao

      am I blanching them wrong? you put them in boiling water until they spit, yes?

    2. Before I answer, what is your goal? What are you wanting to make with these?

      2 Replies
        1. re: Chowrin

          I think I'd use globe or plum tomatoes for salsa or just leave the skin on instead of going through all the work of peeling all those small tomatoes.

          For tomato soup, just place them in the pot at whatever stage you normally do, crush them with a potato masher, then run everything through a food mill. You'll have a perfectly smooth tomato soup in no time.

      1. Freezing them and then thawing will also make the skins come off, but you may not want a frozen and thawed texture for your final product. However, I can say that in my experience, oven roasting is probably not a good way to go with cherry tomatoes. Because they are so small, the insides will cook right along with the skins and you'll end up without much actual meat to peel the skin away from.

        1 Reply
        1. re: biondanonima

          how different is that from roasting, in terms of texture? particularly if I only freeze them for a bit...

        2. I make a pasta sauce that calls for roasting cherry tomatoes for 15 minutes, and I guarantee you that is not a good way to peel them as they turn to pretty much mush (which is great on pasta).

          I never, ever, peel cherry tomatoes as the skin is pretty tender and doesn't bother me in cooked dishes. Also, the pulp is pretty tender compared to full-size tomaotoes.

          1. If you're looking for other options to using cherry tomatoes, how about cutting the cherry tomatoes in half, tossing with a little olive oil, garlic and basil.
            Roast until caramelized (450F for about 20 minutes).

            Afterwards, you can use as is or blend into a puree.

            1. i never bother peeling tomatoes. just too much work. that being said, they'll be nearly impossible to peel if your broil them.

              1. I dont ever peel cherry tomatoes. I blanch then peel regular tomatoes, but it seems like an extra step thats not needed when dealing with the little guys. The skin is so thin and tender there will be no discernible difference in quality between a peeled and unpeeled cherry tomato.
                As far as roasting them goes, a really low temperature is best. Half them, toss them in a little oil and salt and put them on a sheet pan in a 175 degree oven for a couple of hours. YUM!

                1. Yes. I do this all the time. 425 for 8-12 min. usually does the trick, but it depends on the size sometimes. I leave them whole...they "pop" and the skins split.

                  1 Reply
                  1. re: murphlaw152

                    Drizzle with a bit of olive oil first

                  2. I've never bothered removing the skins on cherry tomatoes. Cook them down and enjoy. They're so naturally sweet that I don't think you need to bother with it. The skins will actually kind of start to come off on their own after you broil them a bit, but honestly I eat the whole thing.