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Is this all there is to Currywurst?

I love all kinds of curry. Thai red, green, Japanese, Chinese, Tikka Masala, Trini Goat, Butter Chicken. Love them all!

So when I learn there was this crazy German sauce that is beloved in Berlin and Hamburg. I figure, why not.

Made it with fine diced onions sweated in a nob of butter, 1/4 cup water, 1/2 cup Heinz ketchup, and 1 Tbs curry powder, few dashes of garlic powder. I let it simmer until it was thick. Slathered it on some mettwurst.

I couldn't help but feel I ruin some good mettwurst. It just taste like ketchup on brats! Yuck!

Am I missing something or is this all there is to currywurst?

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    1. You can buy curry ketchup that is made in Germany . I have some Feisner brand wich I enjoy. Same as when I visited the country. Where did you find that recipie ?

      6 Replies
      1. re: emglow101

        Online, but it's very similar to the one in Barbecue Planet as well.

        1. re: Crockett67

          If you can find some curry ketchup in your area give it a try. Seems like there is alot of curry in the recipie. In the ketchup they make you can barely taste it.

          1. re: emglow101

            lol! That's not a savings grace for me. I'm a mustard on onions on brats person. Anything that taste remotely like Ketchup even on a hotdog is vile to me.

            I was hoping some how adding onions and curry powder would change it enough to make it edible.

            1. re: Crockett67

              If anything that tastes remotely like ketchup is vile to you, then you will not enjoy any typical version of currywurst. It has nothing to do with any of the curry dishes you mention in your OP. Whether industrial or home-made, good or bad, the sauce for currywurst is essentially a spicy ketchup.

              1. re: DeppityDawg

                True. I cannot imagine anybody who despises ketchup even attempting this dish.

        2. <<<<<<< Made it with fine diced onions sweated in a nob of butter, 1/4 cup water, 1/2 cup Heinz ketchup, and 1 Tbs curry powder, few dashes of garlic powder. I let it simmer until it was thick. Slathered it on some mettwurst.>>>>>>>>>>>>

          ---------------------------

          In theory, that is all there is to it,

          In reality, I make my own using tomato sauce or puree, cider vinegar, sauteed onions, garlic powder, Madras curry, worsteshire sauce, brown sugar and a few other spices and components. I then simmer it on low for quite some time adding water as necessary .

          I find using prepared ketchup as the main base can be problematic in that it usually overwhelms the subtly of the curry and it can be too thick after heating /cooking. Thus why I basically make my own "ketchup."

          I'm in an area of the US with a strong German heritage so finding a recipe locally (and there are many ) has not been a problem. Like Italian red sauce, there are many variations, but all of our local German based social organizations make thier own currywurst sauce from scratch that's more than just curry powder and prepared ketchup. And you can definately tell.

          I guess I see and taste the final products locally as a curry flavored plumb/tomato jam that's thinned and a bit sweeter than ketchup but is only related mainly by the vinegar bite. Too much tomato or if the ketchup is too recognizeable, than it does ruin the effect.

          Again, it seems so simple in theory but indeed, it is quite complex.

          3 Replies
          1. re: jjjrfoodie

            Er... I guess I will just have to wait until I can have it made right.

            1. re: Crockett67

              I can try and dig up my recipe.

              Since we have so many spring summer and fall German festivals, I usually only make my own in the winter since I have access to it the other 9 months.

              As for Gio below, that is why I use tomato sauce/puree , cider vinegar, worstershire sauce and brown sugar instead of actual ketchup. it allows you to tweak to suit. Not all ketchup's taste the same and they are pretty powerful to start.

              If reduced enough, it does go on and apply like ketchup or any condiment. If left a bit thinner, I often cut the bratwursts into medallions after cooking and then mix into teh sauce and then serve on a crusty roll. Local restaurants do it both ways.

              Because of the added spices, added sweetness and curry powder, it steers away from ketchup in my mind if done correctly Crockett67.

              I'm not a fan of ketchup on any sausage <insert naughty joke here, LOL>, but the vinegar, sugar and curry flavors should ring a bit more sweet style chutney than ketchup but the smooth consistancy blurs the line. And I'll eat mango chutney on anything. Yum.

              1. re: jjjrfoodie

                I like my currywurst sauce to be a bit thinner than ketchup.

          2. A couple of us made the Planet Barbeque ! Currywurst Sauce recently. The book is this month's COTM. The ingredients are:

            chopped onion
            ground Coleman's mustard or mustard seeds
            peanut oil
            hot Madras curry powder
            minced fennel fronds, or anise seeds
            ketchup
            black pepper
            nutmeg
            After the onion is cooked in hot oil a few minutes add the other ingredients and simmer 5 minutes or till thickened

            Although a cup of ketchup is used I thought it didn't overpower the finished sauce at all. Instead, the sauce was considerably spicy but tempered by the nutmeg and anise/fennel.

            Here are reports of the recipe...
            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8612...
            http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/8612...

            1. My recipe calls for 3/4 cup ketchup, 3/4 T. curry powder, 3/4 T. hot paprika, 1/2 T. onion powder, 1/2 t. garlic powder, 1 T. rice wine vinegar and 1 T. riesling. I think it's marvelous and it tastes nothing like plain old ketchup.