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Restaurants in the 19th in Paris?

Looking for recommendations in the 19th...from budget to high end, if you've got a favorite i'd love to hear about. Any kind of food...thanks..

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  1. there is a short thread lower down regarding eating near parc de la villette, which has some good suggestions.

    tb

    1. In addition to 104, mentioned on the other thread, a wonderful place on a nice day is the newest resto in the Buttes Chaumont - Le Pavillon du Lac.

      1 Reply
      1. re: John Talbott

        Yes - we didn't eat there, but the menu and the plates we saw as we walked past looked really nice.

      2. on the Buttes Chaumont side, the rue Rébeval is developing into something of a foodie street. The small and difficult-to-book cave à manger Chapeau Melon at #92 is probably the the most gastronomique experience if you can handle 3-hour long meals (eating time 20 minutes) and tolerate 9 € corkage fees... but the 30 to 35 € menu represents such a good price/quality ratio that I tend to overlook all the other deficits. For a traditional bistro du quartier, the very affordable Queue de Boeuf at #70 is a textbook example... but it just changed owners this summer so not sure about the current quality and vibe. Mon Oncle le Vigneron, around the corner on the rue Pradier, is an épicerie with a table d'hôte ... mostly Basque... usually I'm not a big fan of elbow-to-elbow obliged camaraderie with strangers at a table d'hôte but the conviviality here is actually quite enjoyable. Also on rue Pradier, Le Brick is perfectly fine for a tasty no-frills sample of North African cuisine. For cheap and healthy (maybe too earnestly so), Zoé Bouillon at #66 rue Rébeval is almost perfect for a light lunch of occasionally weird soups and salads shared with occasionally weird but very slim bobos. And speaking of weird, Valentin at #64 is an auvergnat bistro that has strayed, with very mixed results, into South American and world cuisine while still maintaining its original classic core... somehow I enjoy the confusion... especially when it is so affordable (around 12 € for lunch and 30 € for dinner)... but very inconsistent and I would therefore put it on your if-everyplace-else-is-full list.

        the rue du Plateau + nearby streets also has a small cluster of decent restaurants... Quedubon, an épicerie/ cave à manger at 22 rue du Plateau is probably the most highly regarded ... food is indeed good (usually) but the choice is limited and there are so many regulars that outsiders sometimes feel neglected... like the nearby Baratin, lots of other restauranteurs drop by on their days off... food is very affordable but it is a cave à manger and the wines can easily double your tab. Le Bar Fleuri at #1 is a postcard-perfect vision of a Parisien corner café... the cafe grub is however surprisingly good and cheap... the clientele ranges from skint students to old geezers who look like they haven't moved from their place at the bar since 1962. To add to the incongruity, there's a very popular Israeli restaurant at #3... never tried it but it looks fun... like most Jewish restaurants in Paris, the cuisine is more Middle East than Middle Europe. The Atelier de Jacques on the rue Tunnel (parallel to rue du Plateau and linked by side streets or, more fun, a narrow passageway from the even number side of the rue du Plateau) just opened a few months ago ... French-Italian cuisine... i had a very decent lunch for 16 € on the upstairs terrace but friends who have gone since were quite disappointed.

        the adjoining fringes of the 10th and 20th have two of my favourite restos... le Galopin on the cutesy place Sainte Marthe (just on the other side of the boulevard Villette from the 19th) is always a joy. But, best of all, the just-opened Roseval at the rue d'Eupatoria/ rue Julien Lacroix ... gloriously and, for restaurant named after a potato, surprisingly epicurean and contemporary... probably my best meal of the summer and I was limited to the 35 € menu... can't wait to go back for the wine-pairing menu at 65 €

        7 Replies
        1. re: Parnassien

          WOW! this is just what I need for my next trip to Paris. Quedubon has been a favorite for the last few years. Now I have a few more to try. Thanks.

          1. re: Parnassien

            When were you at La Galopin last ?
            Was there with Mangeur and her OH in June and found it to be
            terribly noisy,
            terribly hot,
            and regretfully terribly terrible.
            lt was my first visit but Mangeur was a big fan and said since 1/2 the bar was removed and another 6 top put in, too noisy.
            Mainly the food was not interesting, not good, or fairly priced.

            1. re: Delucacheesemonger

              just a few weeks ago and ... mid-week and not during a heat wave ... not at all as you describe ...and certainly an excellent price-quality ratio

              but i should have added a caveat and omitted "always a joy"... like so many restaurants in Paris, it is badly ventilated and not fun when the temps soar... and certainly not a good cooking environment either.

              maybe the topic for another thread about cool-weather vs hot-weather choices and options

              1. re: Parnassien

                Shades of Gigi, "Ah, yes, I remember it well": one of Paris' unbearably humid days in the high 30Cs. We arrived at Le Galopin, all three of us dripping. The kind of evening when your best option was to cancel and stay home where it's cool.

                The room was terribly hot and terribly noisy. However, I did like the food, as much as I would have liked any restaurant food that night. It is my style of cooking and portion size, in the same vein as Rino and even Saturne: small dishes of (I think) interestingly prepared food, no choice so always a crap-shoot in terms of what you'll be served. I find it a decent value in that the portion sizes allow me to consume the entire meal rather than pay for a lot that I don't eat. (I have finally convinced my DH that he is not my garbage disposal.)

                Le Galopin is not for those who prefer to control their choices, enjoy large portions of classic dishes or big cuts of protein. I will return and hope for a less boisterous six-some at the new table. Will report back.

                As DCM wrote, it was a train-wreck, a brow-mopping, dripping wet, noisy train-wreck. The only time in my life I felt so off-base was when I invited a friend to join me at the ballet to see Romeo and Juliet. A ballet buff, she was ecstatic until the overture started, at which point she swiveled in her seat and stared at me in abject horror. The ballet was by Prokofiev and she was expecting Tchaikovsky.

                1. re: mangeur

                  "It is my style of cooking and portion size, in the same vein as Rino and even Saturne: small dishes of (I think) interestingly prepared food, no choice so always a crap-shoot in terms of what you'll be served. I find it a decent value in that the portion sizes allow me to consume the entire meal rather than pay for a lot that I don't eat. (I have finally convinced my DH that he is not my garbage disposal.)"

                  Rino and Saturne l like very much, but on that evening, l did not like the food at Le Galopin and at 55 euros for the prix fixe, found not good value.

                  1. re: mangeur

                    Oh...kind of like this weekend.

                    Hope nobody's melted...it's supposed to be more comfortable this weekend.

                    1. re: sunshine842

                      We go out only in the early morning or after sundown, like vampires. Kinda nice.