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Maple sugar

Rilke Aug 11, 2012 12:57 PM

Has anyone tried subbing out table sugar (sucrose) with maple sugar in any recipes? Trader Joe's Fearless Flyer says it is twice as sweet as sugar. Does that mean I should use half as much (for, say, Chow's intense brownie recipe)? I enjoy cooking but I am an amateur baker.

TIA.

  1. chefj Aug 11, 2012 01:38 PM

    Remember that sugar is consider a liquid when baking so just leaving half of the volume out would probably not have a good result.

    here is a search done on this site with lots of results
    http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/840755

    remember the search tool

    2 Replies
    1. re: chefj
      Rilke Aug 11, 2012 01:47 PM

      I actually tried the search tool first. Apparently I am unskilled at that as well :-) Thanks for your help.

      1. re: Rilke
        chefj Aug 12, 2012 12:15 PM

        You have to expand the search time. All the options appear in the menu at the top of the page when you get your search results. I think the default is 1 year.
        We all learn stuff on Chowhound ( - ;

    2. biondanonima Aug 12, 2012 02:54 PM

      I would hesitate to use maple sugar in place of regular sugar for several reasons. First, although I LOVE maple, it doesn't belong in everything - the flavor of maple sugar is quite intense. Second, it's INCREDIBLY expensive in comparison to white sugar. I wouldn't worry about the sweetness level so much, since you can always taste and adjust, but unless I were making a specifically maple recipe I would not use maple sugar.

      1. Father Kitchen Aug 12, 2012 05:57 PM

        I think the information you got from Trader Joe's needs some tweaking. Maple sugar is 90% sucrose, with the remaining ten percent mainly as fructose. Fructose tastes somewhat sweeter, but I would question whether maple sugar would taste twice as sweet as straight fructose. I would suggest you taste equal amounts of each and then decide.

        1. t
          tastesgoodwhatisit Aug 12, 2012 06:48 PM

          I would sub them equally, but I would do it by *weight* rather than volume. Different sugars can pack very differently, depending on fluffiness and/or grain size.

          1. p
            pitterpatter Aug 13, 2012 08:12 AM

            I use palm sugar for all of my baking. To my palate, it tastes pretty close to maple sugar, but is a fraction of the cost ($2/lb) and is very low on the glycemic index.

            1 Reply
            1. re: pitterpatter
              biondanonima Aug 13, 2012 08:24 AM

              I don't know know that I've ever tasted palm sugar straight - I'll have to give it a try. I adore maple flavor but maple sugar is just painfully expensive.

            2. p
              pâté chinois Aug 14, 2012 07:33 AM

              reposting because apparently my original post didnt meet Chowhound's rules:

              I'm not sure I would use maple sugar in recipes like cakes where sugar plays a great role in texture. I do use it a lot, since we have a family sugar shack, but do not think it fares well in cakes. It IS great in crumbles, in pancakes, in some muffins where it doesn't really matter if the end product is more dense), in bread, really, practically everywhere else than in muffins.

              I use the same rule for coconut sugar, and I can say that coconut sugar really doesn't work in macarons: http://www.flickr.com/photos/39835867@N00/5522300335/in/photostream/

              The lavender macarons I made the same day, with sugar: http://www.flickr.com/photos/39835867...

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