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Paris - Meats for sandwiches - DELI's?

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Are there any ( in USA ) we call DELI's that will slice meat for sandwiches per pound/kilo to take home. ( eg "corn beef" or "roast beef" or turkey )

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  1. I suppose you are looking for meat slices, and not sandwiches or a real deli, right?
    All charcuteries slice cold cuts. Roast beef can be found in most charcuteries and traiteurs. Turkey is not something the French eat every day. The only charcuerie that cuts turkey slices - and makes sandwiches out of them - is Finkelstajn on rue des Rosiers.
    Corn beef does not exist in Paris.

    16 Replies
    1. re: Parigi

      a related question, and allow me to first thank all of the generous, insightful, patient with travelers and visitors, and informative contributors to this board. Will the neighborhood marches like Richard Lenoir or Aligre have charcuteries that sell jamon iberico de bellota, or must one go to the grand epicerie/Lafayette gallery, or to the specialized establishments like Bellota Bellota or DaRosa ? as you probably know, re. that jamon, the u.s. govt. only allows imports from one specific producer's curing facility to come into the u.s. Is there a similar French jambon ? interested as well in trying to find saucisson sec made from duck -- there's a bistro in Pigalle that has it, but is this something relatively easy to find in other places, or not ? again, merci beaucoup to all who share knowledge with us ignorant visitors.

      [note to t.cruz] you might know this already, but the Brits do consume corned beef and many come to France, so there could be shops that cater to that clientele. but they don't call it corned beef. if it's sold to Brits in France, it might be called the French translation for the English word for it, 'salt' beef, or something like that.

      1. re: moto

        Who is "t.cruz]"?

        " Will the neighborhood marches like Richard Lenoir or Aligre have charcuteries that sell jamon iberico de bellota,"

        Maybe, but it's not a standard thing that you can count on finding.

        " or must one go to the grand epicerie/Lafayette gallery, or to the specialized establishments like Bellota Bellota or DaRosa ?"

        You are sure to find there. Or at Oteiza 18 bld St Michel and 13 rue Vignon.

        DH loves corned beef and can never find any in Paris. I would not count on British visitors' taste being catered to. A country with a population of 1 billion and some odds loves to eat dog meat, and one can't expect the French to cater to them and serve toutoune chez Toutoune now, can one?

        1. re: Parigi

          thanks for the advice re. Pierre Oteiza ! they even have the duck sausage, according to the website. it looks like his jambon is from French pigs (their own farm in the Basque region) and won't be quite like the jamon iberico de bellota (which isn't from the Iberian part of the Basque region) but we will definitely try it.

          true enough about the visitors you have now from the Middle Kingdom, but in terms of a serious volume of tourists, that's a fairly recent thing, isn't it, compared to the Brits who have in the past taken possession of parts of your fair country. there are other cultures that eat dog meat ; one of the most popular breeds of 'lap dogs' here in amerika, the Chihuahua, was developed from small canines kept around as a protein source in pre-colombian mesoamerica. granted, the ancestors of most of the pre-euroinvasion new world indigenes came from Asia, home for many of the present day dog eating cultures.

          1. re: moto

            Oteiza sells jambon de porc basque and jambon des Aldudes, but no ibérico de bellota.
            For that sort of jamon, go to specialized stores like Bellota Bellota, Da Rosa, Grande Epicerie, and there's also a shop entirely dedicated to it rue du Cardinal-Lemoine, facing the Tour d'Argent.

            Corned beef can be found in every supermarket. The brand is Dolo. Not like the real thing but if you want US-style corned beef, you should make it at home.

            1. re: Ptipois

              merci, Ptipois. i.i.r.c., that shop is called Terra de Bellota.

              thank to you as well, Parassien for the tips on saucisson de canard. food bloggers elsewhere also refer to the Marche Bastille by that incorrect name, but of course the marche probably goes back to times when those streets had different names altogether. it's great you can still enjoy your grandfather's company and wisdom, and that he still can enjoy the benefits of his own testosterone and not rely on supplements.

              1. re: moto

                " it's great you can still enjoy your grandfather's company and wisdom, and that he still can enjoy the benefits of his own testosterone and not rely on supplements."

                LOL

                1. re: Parigi

                  at 86 and despite a copious consumption of oysters, the benefits of his own testosterone are pretty infrequent... at least according to my grandmother :)

                2. re: moto

                  The Mairie de Paris unaccountably re-named it "Marché Richard-Lenoir" for a few years about a decade ago. But for us parisiens, it was, is, and always will be the Marché Bastille. Fortunately the fonctionnaires at city hall have bowed to reality and it is once again officially Bastille.

          2. re: moto

            re saucisson de canard, pretty easy to find... i'd try the charcuteries (at least 4 different ones, i think) in the covered section of the Marché d'Aligre ... i've also seen it on charcuterie stalls at the Marché Bastille (pet peeve alert: Chowhounders persistently mis-name it as the Marché Richard-Lenoir) and the Marché Popincourt (also on the boulevard Richard-Lenoir between rue Oberkampf and rue J-P Timbaud) ... but as Parigi points out you can never count on finding a specific product at a street market... inventory changes from week to week and from season to season... incidentally, my grandfather refuses to eat saucisson de canard because it reportedly contains virility-dampening saltpeter ... just thought i'd share :)

            1. re: Parnassien

              I think all saucissons contain saltpeter, there is a dose of it in every sel de charcutier - if that may be useful information for your grandfather.

              1. re: Ptipois

                I know and he knows ... but he remembers some small scandale in the '60s when the high levels of saltpeter in, specifically, saucisson de canard was blamed by some loony quack for the falling birthrate...

                1. re: Parnassien

                  Isn't it ironical that it took a quack to blame saucisson de canard.

            2. re: moto

              lots and lots and lots of dry-cured hams in France -- Bayonne, in particular, produces a famous one. They won't taste like Bellota, but they're awfully good.

              Some butcher shops sell sliced meat - look for "boucherie", "charcuterie" (specializes in cured meats), or "traiteur" (like a deli; salads and other prepared goodies as well). You can also buy packaged sliced meats at groceries and superettes (not as tasty, but it's an option).

              Parigi, I make my own corned beef with this recipe: http://www.chow.com/recipes/18629-cor...

              I used jumeau, on the advice of the butcher -- it came out *great*.

              1. re: sunshine842

                I must hide this thread from DH. He'd want to run off with you.

                1. re: Parigi

                  Heh....my DH would fend him off with a fork!

                  The hardest park of the recipe is remembering to go buy the beef a week ahead of time....

            3. re: Parigi

              In the army it was called "singe" for some (good?) reason...