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Malmo, Sweden

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I will be in Malmo for 2 days in Aug. (a grandmother's ancestral town). Has anyone been thru there in the last year or so? If not, where should I look for restaurant recommendations? Lonely Planet?
Thanks

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  1. Grand Öl & Mat is full of hipsters but enjoyable nonetheless. Modern bistro-style fare, and the dining room turns into a crowded bar as the night progresses. www.grandolomat.se

    Restaurang Bastard is also trendy but very good, with a focus on meat dishes. The menu changes daily afaik. www.bastardrestaurant.se

    Restaurang Asien, situated close to Möllevångstorget, is a wonderful vietnamese-style eatery. It's simple food in simple surroundings, but done to a very high standard. www.restaurangasien.se

    Also, make sure to have a falafel! Malmö is famous throughout sweden for huge, cheap and delicious falafel rolls. Perfect after a night out or as a snack. You can find them throughout town, but I'd recommend Falafel no. 1 either at Triangeln or on Bergsgatan 37.

    Enjoy your trip!

    1. I've checked out some places in Malmo, Sweden. For those who don't know, Malmo is a neighboring town to Copenhagen, Denmark. My advice in general is to head for the bigger city, the options in Malmo are quite limited. On the bright side however, it is a little cheaper. You can check the Swedish restaurant guide at www.whiteguide.se/province/malmo . It's obviously in Swedish but very easy to understand for a foreigner since it's mostly a rating and a map location for each restaurant. Have Google translate it if really needed. I believe these ratings are set for an entire year unfortunately so they may sometimes be a little out of date. Same system as Michelin basically. I can recommend Bastard and Belle Epoque for Bistro like experiences and Vollmers for set menus (degustation). Vollmers is quiet and a little austere though so if you want a more lively feel, go for the others.

      1. Just wanted to say that I used Lonely Planet's Copenhagen Encounter guidebook while visiting Copenhagen. It has a small Malmo section that was essentially useless for casual meals. It offered 6 recommendations and they were all high end ($$$ ratings).

        My husband and I spend 10 days in Denmark in May. We popped over to Malmo for a half day and just ended up having a lunch in a cafe in a square. It advertised itself and the "Home of Cheesecake!) but we didn't have any dessert :( they looked great though. Just checked my trip notes... it was called Pronto.

        In the same square, there were some interesting looking restaurants there with traditional foods but they were closed until dinner time.

        1. Wow! super info.! Thanks to all

          1. Spent two days there last year and wasn't really taken by anything. The buffet breakfast at our hotel: Mayfair Tunneln was very good, but our dinner at the Radhuskalleren was just middling. Although pretty, I found Malmo really sterile and conservative compared with Copenhagen. Even the street hotdogs in CPH had more flair.

            1 Reply
            1. re: currycue

              Hi curry - Thanks. I'm only going to Malmo because my maternal grandmother came from there. She thot it was boring! And split for the States. Will now spend only one day there and may go see the Viking stuff or go up to Lund to see the church and univ. Everyone sez: go to Copenhagen! Well, I don't have enuf time for that great city.
              Thanks again
              L.

            2. A bit late, but for future reference do not go to Johan P for seafood. My sister's bisque came at room temperature (I believe it cost around $40 US or more). the waiter explained it would take awhile for the new batch to be made from fresh, so imagine our surprise when we found the half eaten crouton my sister had bit into earlier sitting in the bowl. My fried fish was very greasy and inedible. And despite all the references online regarding the indoor food market, it no longer exists!

              A couple things I would suggest: the cafe on the grounds of the castle. Picturesque location, fresh, clean, seasonal food (had a great beet risotto). And trying spettkaka - literally "spit (like a rotating spit, not saliva) cake". It's a specialty of the province of skane and has protected status there. It's a potato flour based cake that looks like a giant funnel cake and tastes like those little Japanese melt in your mouth potato flour cookies that come in the cute aluminum packets (I know, random and somewhat esoteric reference, but it really taste exactly like them)